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The Indian Man: A Biography of James Mooney

Steven M. Kane, +2 more
- 23 Jan 1985 - 
- Vol. 32, Iss: 4, pp 399
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TLDR
The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time as discussed by the authors.
Abstract
The Indian Man examines the life of James Mooney (1861-1921), the son of poor Irish immigrants who became a champion of Native peoples and one of the most influential anthropology fieldworkers of all time. As a staff member of the Smithsonian Institution for over three decades, Mooney conducted fieldwork and gathered invaluable information on rapidly changing Native American cultures across the continent. His fieldwork among the Eastern Cherokees, Cheyennes, and Kiowas provides priceless snapshots of their traditional ways of life, and his sophisticated and sympathetic analysis of the 1890 Ghost Dance and the consequent tragedy at Wounded Knee has not been surpassed a century later. L. G. Moses is a professor of history at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians, 1833-1933.

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"The Indian Man" and the Irishman: James Mooney and Irish Folklore

TL;DR: Douglas Hyde and his wife Lucy visited Washington, D. C. in May 1906, where, for the second occasion during his American mission, he met President Theodore Roosevelt as discussed by the authors, who was interested in Irish matters and knowledgeable about the Irish storytelling tradition.
Journal ArticleDOI

The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

TL;DR: The Name of War as discussed by the authors is a history of King Philip's War (1675-1678) and of war in general, chronicling, explaining, justifying, memorializing, and even fictionalizing.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI

Collaborative Ethnography and Public Anthropology

TL;DR: Collaborative ethnography as discussed by the authors is a powerful way to engage the public with anthropology, and it can be seen as a way to serve humankind more directly and more immediately.
BookDOI

A Companion to American Indian History

TL;DR: In this paper, Deloria et al. presented a survey of the history of American Indians in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, focusing on the first contact, kinship, family kindreds, and community.
Journal ArticleDOI

Ethnography as theory

TL;DR: In more than a hundred years of Anglo-American ethnography, observation has been combined with a wide variety of theoretical outlooks from structured-functionalist to critical writings.
MonographDOI

Indigenous Intellectuals: Sovereignty, Citizenship, and the American Imagination, 1880–1930

TL;DR: Vigil as discussed by the authors examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged long-held conceptions of Indian identity at the turn of the twentieth century and traces how the narrative discourses created by these figures spurred wider discussions about citizenship, race, and modernity in the United States.

The making of the Metis in the Pacific Northwest : fur trade children : race, class, and gender

TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the emergence of the Metis Indians in the Pacific Northwest by tracing the growing up experiences of fur trade youngsters from infancy to old age, focusing on the children at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company headguarters for the region.