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The Korean Frontier In America: Immigration To Hawaii, 1896-1910

01 Jan 1988-
About: The article was published on 1988-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 16 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Frontier & Immigration.
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The article focuses on four major social functions of Korean immigrant churches: providing fellowship for Korean immigrants; maintaining the Korean cultural tradition; providing social services for church members and the Korean community as a whole; and 4) providing social status and positions for Korean adult immigrants.
Abstract: social functions for Korean church members and the Korean commu? nity as a whole. This article has two major objectives. First, it provides descriptive information on the structure of Korean immigrant churches in the United States. More importantly, it systematically analyzes social functions of Korean immigrant churches. The article focuses on four major social functions: 1) providing fellowship for Korean immigrants; 2) maintaining the Korean cultural tradition; 3) providing social services for church members and the Korean commu? nity as a whole; and 4) providing social status and positions for Korean adult immigrants. Interviews with 131 Korean head pastors in New York City are the major data source for this study. Although Korea has never been a major Protestant country, Christians have constituted a large proportion of Korean immigrants to the United States. Historical studies (Choy, 1979; Patterson, 1988) suggest that approximately 40 percent of the pioneer immigrants to Hawaii at the turn of the century were Christians prior to immigration, and that the majority of them at? tended ethnic churches in the United States. The same studies emphasize that ethnic churches became the most important ethnic organizations for Korean immigrants, which helped them to maintain social interactions and cultural traditions. In addition, Korean ethnic churches became centers of the Korean independence movement against Japan (Lyu, 1977). A larger proportion of post-1965 Korean immigrants are affiliated with ethnic churches than are earlier Korean immigrants. Case studies in Los

285 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The Story of the Korean People Thought and Religion Arts and Literature Performing Arts Daily Life and Folkways Life in a Korean Village Life in Urban Korea Gender, Marriage, and the Lives of Korean Women Greater Korea: Looking Ahead Glossary Suggestions for Further Reading Index as mentioned in this paper
Abstract: Series Foreword The Story of the Korean People Thought and Religion Arts and Literature Performing Arts Daily Life and Folkways Life in a Korean Village Life in Urban Korea Gender, Marriage, and the Lives of Korean Women Greater Korea: Looking Ahead Glossary Suggestions for Further Reading Index

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
In-Jin Yoon1
TL;DR: The international migration and settlement of Koreans began in 1860 and there are now about 6.8 million overseas Koreans in 170 countries as mentioned in this paper. But the motivations and characteristics of Korean immigrants in each period were different.
Abstract: The international migration and settlement of Koreans began in 1860 and there are now about 6.8 million overseas Koreans in 170 countries. Each wave of Korean migration was driven by different historical factors in the homeland and the host countries, and hence the motivations and characteristics of Korean immigrants in each period were different. The diverse conditions in and government policies of the host countries also affected the mode of entry and incorporation of Koreans. A contrast is drawn between the ‘old’ and the ‘new’ Korean migrations. The former consists of those who migrated to Russia, China, America and Japan from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century. They were from the lower classes, pushed out by poverty, war and oppression in the homeland. Few returned to the homeland but preserved their collective identities and ethnic cultures in their host societies. The new migrants to America, Europe and Latin America since the 1960s, however, come from middle-class backgrounds, are pu...

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history of Asian Americans can be divided into four periods: the first, characterized by partisanship, lasted from the 1870s to the early 1920s; the second, from 1920s to 1960s, was dominated by social scientists; the third, during which revisionist works appeared, extended from the 1960s to early 1980s; and the fourth period, which began in the early 80s, have professional historians played a leading role in creating historical knowledge about Asian Americans as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: teenth century. The Asian American historiographical tradition is thus one and a half centuries old. It may be divided into four periods. The first, characterized by partisanship, lasted from the 1870s to the early 1920s. The second, from the 1920s to the 1960s, was dominated by social scientists. The third, during which revisionist works appeared, extended from the 1960s to the early 1980s. Only in the fourth period, which began in the early 1980s, have professional historians played a leading role in creating historical knowledge about Asian Americans. Though virtually none of the studies published during the first three periods were written by historians, they nevertheless are of historical interest because they reflect the temper of the times in which they were produced. Authored by missionaries, diplomats, politicians, labor leaders,journalists, propagandists, and scholars trained in sociology, economics, social psychology, and political science, this literature is quite voluminous. I shall identify its salient features before turning my attention to books published in the last fifteen years.1

36 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Park et al. as discussed by the authors examined how Koreans received and consumed the Olympic Games under Japanese colonial rule (1910−1945) by exploring Olympic fever in colonial Korea, showing how multifaceted aspects of Korean society became a part of the global sports world.
Abstract: This dissertation examines how Koreans received and consumed the Olympic Games under Japanese colonial rule (1910–1945). Although a growing body of research on colonial Korea addresses a range of topics beyond politics and economy, sports is still a relatively neglected topic in this field. By exploring Olympic fever in colonial Korea, this study shows how multifaceted aspects of Korean society became a part of the global sports world. Korean athletes participated in the 1932 Summer, 1936 Winter, and 1936 Summer Games as part of the Japanese delegation, attracting much attention from members of all walks of life in colonial Korea. Public figures as varied as political leaders, intellectuals, sport journalists, and athletes recognized and promoted the Games through the burgeoning mass media. As the Olympic Games were a powerful tool for promoting Korean nationalism, Korean athletes’ performance was in the spotlight of Korean vernacular media, which also pursued commercial interests in featuring scandals of athletes. Nevertheless, many advocates of public gymnastics criticized what they perceived as the bourgeois-oriented, if not elitist, nature of the Games. Ahead of the 1940 Tokyo Olympic Games, Koreans were not passive spectators, but active participants and consumers eager to promote their nation to the world. The occasion also allowed the Japanese colonial regime and Korean collaborators to praise Korean athletes in the context of Japan’s official policy of “harmony between Japanese and Koreans” (naisen yūwa) and “assimilation” (dōka). Indeed, sports played a powerful role in propagating Japanese assimilation policies in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Overall, the Olympic Games during the Japanese occupation of Korea were a contested space in which a variety of discourses clashed, reflecting the variegated nature of colonial Korea as it interacted with global commodities and cultural influences. Embracing the international mega-sporting event fueled debates about nationalism, racism, commercialism, class conflict, and collaboration, among others. Degree Type Dissertation Degree Name Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Graduate Group East Asian Languages & Civilizations First Advisor Eugene Y. Park

20 citations