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Journal ArticleDOI

The Life and Times of the Ayyūbid Vizier al-Ṣāḥib b. Shukr

04 May 2020-Der Islam (De Gruyter)-Vol. 97, Iss: 1, pp 89-119
TL;DR: The career of al-Ṣāḥib b. Shukr (548-622/1153-1225), the most important vizier of Ayyubid Egypt, is described in this article.
Abstract: Abstract This is a description and assessment of the career of al-Ṣāḥib b. Shukr (548–622/1153–1225), the most important vizier of Ayyūbid Egypt. Born in the Delta, and raised in an influential family, he studied to become a jurist. After serving as a judge (qāḍī), he entered the administration of Saladin and subsequently became the vizier of two Ayyūbid sultans, al-ʿĀdil and his son al-Kāmil. His ruthlessness in raising money for them by transforming the Egyptian vizierate into a fund raising institution was a critical factor in their ability to stay in power, and in saving Egypt from the Fifth Crusade. At the same time he patronized the religious class and built the first Mālikī law school (madrasa) in Cairo. His vizierate represented a nexus of administrative and religious authority in Egypt.
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Book
01 Jan 1972

49 citations


"The Life and Times of the Ayyūbid V..." refers background in this paper

  • ...5 As a result of Ibn Shukr’s unavoidable presence in the sources, he has been mentioned in key monographs related to Ayyūbid Egypt, namely, Gottschalk 1958, Rabie 1972, Dahlmanns 1975, Leiser 1976, and Humphreys 1977....

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  • ...…Ibn Shukr then held forth in the Dār al-Sulṭana (the Sultan’s palace) in the room (ḥujra) of al-Qāḍī l-Fāḍil and became the nāẓir of all the dīwāns.42 He used to say, “I have no regrets except that Ibn al-Baysānī (i. e., al-Qāḍī l-Fāḍil) 38 Rabie 1972, 138; Dahlmanns 1975, 196; Şeşen 1983, 112....

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Book
01 Jan 1977

49 citations


"The Life and Times of the Ayyūbid V..." refers background in this paper

  • ...62 Humphreys 1977, 139–140....

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  • ...5 As a result of Ibn Shukr’s unavoidable presence in the sources, he has been mentioned in key monographs related to Ayyūbid Egypt, namely, Gottschalk 1958, Rabie 1972, Dahlmanns 1975, Leiser 1976, and Humphreys 1977....

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  • ...…one of its professors, al-Fatḥ Ibn Mūsā Najm al-Din al-Jazīrī, who took up his post in 617/1220–1221, in charge of the treasury of the “eastern provinces” (bilād al-sharq), Humphreys 1977, 163; Leiser 1976, 391; al-Ṣafadī, al-Wāfī (1962– 2013), 7, 225–226 on Ibn al-Mashṭūb, and 23, 724 on Ibn Mūsā....

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  • ...59 Humphreys 1977, 148–149; Abū Shāma, al-Dhayl (1974), 147; al-Nuwayrī, Nihāyat (1992), 29, 50, who also states that Ibn Shukr accompanied al- ʿ Ādil to Cairo in Sha ʿ bān 607/January 1211; al-Ṣafadī, al-Wāfī (1962–2013), 17, 328....

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  • ...56 Dahlmanns 1975, 113–184; Humphreys 1977, 87–160. agreements with the Franks....

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Dissertation
03 Aug 2012
TL;DR: The authors explored the emergence of Arabic encyclopaedic literature in the scholarly centers of Egypt and Syria during the Mamluk Empire (1250-1517) and argued that the rise of encyclopaedia in this period was emblematic of a certain intellectual ethos, a systematic approach to the classification of knowledge which emerged in the discursive context of a rapidly centralizing imperial state.
Abstract: This dissertation explores the emergence of a golden age of Arabic encyclopaedic literature in the scholarly centers of Egypt and Syria during the Mamluk Empire (1250-1517). At the heart of the project is a study of Shihāb al-Dīn Aḥmad b. ʿAbd al-Wahhāb al-Nuwayrī’s (d. 1333) Nihāyat al-arab fī funūn al-adab (‘The Ultimate Ambition in the Branches of Erudition’), a 31-volume encyclopaedic work composed at the beginning of the 14 century and divided into five parts: (i) heaven and earth; (ii) the human being; (iii) animals; (iv) plants; and (v) the history of the world. My study examines the formal arrangement, thematic contents, and codicological features of this seminal work, arguing that the rise of encyclopaedism in this period was emblematic of a certain intellectual ethos, a systematic approach to the classification of knowledge which emerged in the discursive context of a rapidly centralizing imperial state. I argue that the Nihāya grew out of an amalgam of several genres (including the adab anthology, the cosmographical compendium, the chancery scribe manual, the dynastic chronicle, and the commonplace book), developing into a new form and serving a different purpose from its literary predecessors. Such texts, long considered tokens of intellectual and cultural decadence, demonstrate the strategies used by Mamluk religious scholars, chancery scribes, and littérateurs to navigate an ever-growing corpus of accumulated knowledge.

41 citations

Book
01 Jan 1972

39 citations


"The Life and Times of the Ayyūbid V..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…ʿ Ādil’s son al-Ashraf, who ruled that part of al-Jazīra, 89 This might be a mistake for kattānan, to which it is phonologically similar, meaning a dealer in linen or flax, which was the major product of the region of Ibn Shukr’s hometown, see Ashtor, “Kattān”, EI2, 4, 774; Sergeant 1972, index....

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