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The Nuremberg war crimes trial, 1945-46 : a documentary history

01 Jan 1997-
TL;DR: The Court of International Criminal Tribunal for International Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (COPIN) as mentioned in this paper proposed a framework for the consideration of war crimes and war crimes against humanity.
Abstract: Background - Preparations - The Court - Crimes against Peace - War Crimes - Crimes Against Humanity - Last Words - Assessment - Appendices: - Charges, Verdicts, Sentences - Chronology - Questions for Consideration - Selected Bibliography - Index
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Jon Elster1
06 Sep 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the history of transitional justice in Greece and the French restorations in 1814 and 1815 and the larger universe of cases in the world.
Abstract: Part I. The Universe of Transitional Justice: 1. Athens in 411 and 403 BC. 2. The French restorations in 1814 and 1815 3. The larger universe of cases Part II. Analytics of Transitional Justice: 4. The structure of transitional justice 5. Wrongdoers 6. Victims 7. Constraints 8. Emotions 9. Politics.

519 citations

Book
11 Dec 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the spirit and its expression in the ancient world, from Sun King to Revolution, and World War II to the present day, are discussed, and a survey of the results is presented.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Fear, interest and honor 3. The spirit and its expression 4. The ancient world 5. Medieval Europe 6. From Sun King to Revolution 7. Imperialism and World War I 8. World War II 9. Hitler to Bush and beyond 10. General findings and conclusions.

403 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Seyla Benhabib1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine recent debates concerning the emergence of cosmopolitan norms such as those pertaining to universal human rights, crimes against humanity as well as refugee, immigrant and asylum status.
Abstract: This essay examines recent debates concerning the emergence of cosmopolitan norms such as those pertaining to universal human rights, crimes against humanity as well as refugee, immigrant and asylum status. What some see as the spread of a new human rights regime and a new world order others denounce as the “spread of empire” or characterize as “law without a state”. In contrast, by focusing on the relationship of global capitalism to deterritorialized law this essay distinguishes between the spread of human rights norms and deterritorialized legal regimes. Although both cosmopolitan norms and deterritorialized law challenge the nation-state and threaten to escape control by democratic legislatures, it argues that cosmopolitan norms enhance popular sovereignty while many other forms of global law undermine it. It concludes by pleading for a vision of “republican federalism” and “democratic iterations”, which would enhance popular sovereignty by establishing interconnections across the local, the national ...

188 citations


Cites background from "The Nuremberg war crimes trial, 194..."

  • ...1996); for the Nueremberg trials, compare Marrus (1997); and for Ralph Lemkin and his efforts to pass the Genocide Convention, compare Power (2003). See also Burnkhorst’s (2002) impassioned defense...

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  • ...1996); for the Nueremberg trials, compare Marrus (1997); and for Ralph Lemkin and his efforts to pass the Genocide Convention, compare Power (2003)....

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  • ...…the accounts of trials against members of the “Union and Progress Party” in the Ottoman Empire, who were responsible for the Armenian genocide (Akcam, 1996); for the Nueremberg trials, compare Marrus (1997); and for Ralph Lemkin and his efforts to pass the Genocide Convention, compare Power (2003)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The historical origins and early evolution of the obedience experiments are traced, including the previous experiences that led to Milgram's conception of his rudimentary research idea and the role of his intuition in its refinement.
Abstract: Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority experiments remain one of the most inspired contributions in the field of social psychology. Although Milgram undertook more than 20 experimental variations, his most (in)famous result was the first official trial run - the remote condition and its 65% completion rate. Drawing on many unpublished documents from Milgram's personal archive at Yale University, this article traces the historical origins and early evolution of the obedience experiments. Part 1 presents the previous experiences that led to Milgram's conception of his rudimentary research idea and then details the role of his intuition in its refinement. Part 2 traces the conversion of Milgram's evolving idea into a reality, paying particular attention to his application of the exploratory method of discovery during several pilot studies. Both parts illuminate Milgram's ad hoc introduction of various manipulative techniques and subtle tension-resolving refinements. The procedural adjustments continued until Milgram was confident that the first official experiment would produce a high completion rate, a result contrary to expectations of people's behaviour. Showing how Milgram conceived of, then arrived at, this first official result is important because the insights gained may help others to determine theoretically why so many participants completed this experiment.

96 citations


Cites background from "The Nuremberg war crimes trial, 194..."

  • ...It is noteworthy that relatives who survived the Nazi concentration camps stayed in the Milgram household during 1946 (Fermaglich, 2006, p. 100) and that the speech preceded by only 2 weeks the 1 October 1946 verdict of the widely publicized 10-month-long Nazi war-crimes trial in Nuremberg, Germany (Marrus, 1997, p. 257)....

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  • ...…who survived the Nazi concentration camps stayed in the Milgram household during 1946 (Fermaglich, 2006, p. 100) and that the speech preceded by only 2 weeks the 1 October 1946 verdict of the widely publicized 10-month-long Nazi war-crimes trial in Nuremberg, Germany (Marrus, 1997, p. 257)....

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  • ...…of the Holocaust with blind OTA: ‘I came across many statements which implied that Germans tended to obey orders more conscientious[ly] than Americans’ (as cited in Fermaglich, 2006, p. 88).9 This stereotype stems from the Nuremberg war crimes trials of the surviving Nazi elite (Marrus, 1997)....

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Book
01 Jan 2004

94 citations