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Journal ArticleDOI

The Police and the Public in Australia and New Zealand and the Democratic Policeman

01 Jan 1970-Australian Quarterly (JSTOR)-Vol. 42, Iss: 3, pp 125
About: This article is published in Australian Quarterly.The article was published on 1970-01-01. It has received 1 citations till now.
Citations
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: The authors argue that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated and that crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability.
Abstract: As a receptacle for British convicts, New South Wales was popularly portrayed as a 'vicious' society. Crime and vice were considered the inevitable concomitants of a transported 'criminal class' and convict 'contamination'. The following study, focussing on the mid-nineteenth century, argues that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated. Official criminal statistics, reportage in the press, as well as other contemporary evidence, all present in some ways a distorted view of crime. Crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability. The community's transformation from a penal colony was marked not only by a decreasing proportion of convicts in the population, but a reorientation in standards of public conduct, new fears concerning public order, and an obsessional interest in repudiating the convict stain.

14 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found that English students were significantly more pro-authority than Australian students, and that the GAIAS measure was uncorrelated with attitudes toward institutional authority (the GAIAS).
Abstract: Summary It is argued that “authoritarianism” and “attitude to authority” should be differentiated, and that measures based upon the latter concept hold greater promise of success in investigating differences between cultures. It was confirmed that Ray's Directiveness Scale, a valid measure of one aspect of authoritarianism, is uncorrelated with a general measure of attitudes toward institutional authority (the GAIAS). Further, unlike the Directiveness Scale, that measure provided evidence of cross-cultural differences between college students in England (N = 100) and Australia (N = 100). English students were significantly more pro-authority.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Finnane1
TL;DR: The 1989 Fitzgerald Report in Queensland, Australia was one of the country's most farreaching investigations of police corruption and maladministration as discussed by the authors, and its recommendations, including measures to reorganize the police force and establish new modes of review of the criminal justice system, are made against a background of police reform in other States, including New South Wales and Victoria.
Abstract: The 1989 Fitzgerald Report in Queensland, Australia was one of the country's most far‐reaching investigations of police corruption and maladministration. Its recommendations, including measures to reorganize the police force and establish new modes of review of the criminal justice system, are made against a background of police reform in other States, including New South Wales and Victoria. The paper reviews the Report's findings in the context of the historical development of policing in Australia, centralized, marked by strong police unionism and with periodic crises of corruption and maladministration over the past century. The prospects for police reform are reviewed.

14 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: The authors argue that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated and that crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability.
Abstract: As a receptacle for British convicts, New South Wales was popularly portrayed as a 'vicious' society. Crime and vice were considered the inevitable concomitants of a transported 'criminal class' and convict 'contamination'. The following study, focussing on the mid-nineteenth century, argues that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated. Official criminal statistics, reportage in the press, as well as other contemporary evidence, all present in some ways a distorted view of crime. Crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability. The community's transformation from a penal colony was marked not only by a decreasing proportion of convicts in the population, but a reorientation in standards of public conduct, new fears concerning public order, and an obsessional interest in repudiating the convict stain.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Finnane1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine some key transitions in the development of security policing over the last 100 years in Australia, highlighting some of the contextual features that have shaped them and suggest that apocalyptic rhetoric is part of the politics of policing, shared by both advocates and opponents of tougher policing, and in tension with the more sober realities of a policing that operates within a framework of enabling as well as limiting conditions.
Abstract: Public debate about post 9/11 policing presumes for the most part that the world changed fundamentally at that point and that policing powers and tactics have altered in response. For some people, largely defenders of the necessity of a strong security stance, the changes have been possibly not enough. For others, opponents of the security state, the changes represent a latest instalment in an always threatening rise of totalitarian policing. Seen in macro-perspective these views represent the politics of security, helping to shape, modulate, contain, expand, limit the powers available to police, and the possible uses of them. These opposing views, very often highly antagonistic in expression, are part of the politics, and do not stand outside them. They have also been heard before. In seeking to understand what policing means for stable societies under threat of political violence, this article examines some key transitions in the development of security policing over the last 100 years in Australia, highlighting some of the contextual features that have shaped them. In doing so it will suggest that apocalyptic rhetoric is part of the politics of policing, shared by both advocates and opponents of tougher policing, and in tension with the more sober realities of a policing that operates within a framework of enabling as well as limiting conditions.

10 citations