scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

The Police and the Public in Australia and New Zealand and the Democratic Policeman

01 Jan 1970-Australian Quarterly (JSTOR)-Vol. 42, Iss: 3, pp 125
About: This article is published in Australian Quarterly.The article was published on 1970-01-01. It has received 1 citations till now.
Citations
More filters
DissertationDOI
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: The authors argue that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated and that crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability.
Abstract: As a receptacle for British convicts, New South Wales was popularly portrayed as a 'vicious' society. Crime and vice were considered the inevitable concomitants of a transported 'criminal class' and convict 'contamination'. The following study, focussing on the mid-nineteenth century, argues that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated. Official criminal statistics, reportage in the press, as well as other contemporary evidence, all present in some ways a distorted view of crime. Crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability. The community's transformation from a penal colony was marked not only by a decreasing proportion of convicts in the population, but a reorientation in standards of public conduct, new fears concerning public order, and an obsessional interest in repudiating the convict stain.

14 citations

References
More filters
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: In this article, the authors demonstrate the revelatory, narrative capacity of bystander video of police excessive force shared through social media, and its relationship with mainstream and police media representations of police image work.
Abstract: This chapter demonstrates the revelatory, narrative capacity of bystander video of police excessive force shared through social media, and its relationship with mainstream and police media representations of police ‘image work’. This hierarchical sousveillance can challenge hegemonic mainstream and police media agenda-setting and catalyse direct action, testing police credibility through the diverse range of perspectives characteristic of the ‘social media test’. Analysis of social and mainstream media representations of a case of police excessive force at the 2013 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade, combined with police and non-police responses to in-depth interviews, shows the force of individual stories that can be glossed in police aggregate data published in mainstream news media. The chapter considers the power of ‘latent’ sousveillance; technological scrutiny of authority that while lawful may not be widely known. In this context, the lawful capacity for civilians to generally film police operations in public, that in conjunction with the capacity to share content through social media reached a critical mass in 2013. The chapter argues, and notes the challenges in achieving, the consistency required across representations of the police image to sustain public trust and confidence in police and police legitimacy in a multi-media saturated society.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The main accomplishments of the various specialties and overlapping areas with neighbouring disciplines within New Zealand over time are traced and their relationship within and to mainstream "Sociology" sketched as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The main accomplishments of the various specialties and overlapping areas with neighbouring disciplines within NZ over time are traced and their relationship within and to mainstream ‘Sociology’ sketched. Most remain rather latent subject areas where teaching is carried out at separate sites, while a few have developed active networks of scholarship and research.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, police-ethnic relations in Australia have been investigated in the context of ethnic and migration studies, and the authors present a survey of the results of their work. pp. 220-226
Abstract: (1974). Police‐ethnic relations in Australia. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 220-226.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Age‐specific drink driving offender rates for local government areas in Tasmania show marked variation and a clearcut rural/urban dichotomy in offender rates is not apparent, and explanations are sought in the combination of people, place and policing characteristics of different areas.
Abstract: SUMMARY Age‐specific drink driving offender rates for local government areas in Tasmania show marked variation. Generally high rates typify larger urban centres, some more densely settled rural areas and the west coast mining municipalities. However, a clearcut rural/urban dichotomy in offender rates is not apparent and explanations are sought in the combination of people, place and policing characteristics of different areas.

1 citations