scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
DOI

The Political Aesthetic of the Medieval Persian Prison Poem, 1100-1200

01 Jan 2013-
About: The article was published on 2013-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 6 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Persian studies & Persian literature.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the Qur'an's inimitability across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric and argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory (c ilm al-balgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Arabic rhetoric.
Abstract: Building on the multivalent meanings of the Arabo- Persian tarjama ('to interpret', 'to translate', 'to narrate in writing'), this essay examines the doctrine of Qur'ānic inimitability (i c jāz) across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric. Treating the relation between Arabic and Persian as a case study for a theory of transla- tion specific to Islamic literary culture, it argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory ( c ilm al-balāgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Islamic rhetoric. While examining the implications of Qur'ānic hermeneutics for translation theory, it considers how the inimitability concept impacts on translatability. c Abd al-Qāhir al-Jurjānī's reflections on nazm (structure) enrich and refine Walter Benjamin's argument for translatability as a condition of literary language. Viewing Islamic literary aesthetics from the perspective of Benjaminian thinking about language can infuse contemporary translation theory with a richer sense of the translatability of literary texts.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the development of prison memoirs in modern Iranian prose is examined and a genealogy of the emergence of prison consciousness in Iranian modernity, across both the Pahlavi and post-revolutionary periods.
Abstract: This essay examines the development of prison memoirs in modern Iranian prose. It constructs from the prison memoirs of the dissident writers ʿAli Dashti, Bozorg ʿAlavi, and Reza Baraheni a genealogy of the emergence of prison consciousness in Iranian modernity, across both the Pahlavi and post-revolutionary periods. The modern Iranian prose of incarceration is situated within an account of the prison as a site where the modern technologies of the state are refined. As I trace resonances between the long history of prison writing across the Islamic world and the prison literature of modern Iran, I consider how we can better understand the relation between prose and literary representation in modern Middle Eastern literatures.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are many reasons why scholars of classical Persian literature have had to wait so long for a comprehensive study of Shirwani, the great twelfth-century poet who revolutionized Persian literature.
Abstract: There are many reasons why scholars of classical Persian literature have had to wait so long for a comprehensive study of Khāqānī Shirwānī, the great twelfth-century poet who revolutionized Persian...

4 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The authors investigates the challenges facing Caucasus philology, by which they mean the institutional capacity to conduct textually and historically grounded research into the literary cultures of Azerbaijan Republic, Georgia, Daghestan, and Chechnya.
Abstract: This essay investigates the challenges facing Caucasus philology, by which I mean the institutional capacity to conduct textually and historically grounded research into the literary cultures of Azerbaijan Republic, Georgia, Daghestan, and Chechnya. I argue that the philological approach to the literary cultures of the Caucasus has been a casualty of the rise of areas studies in the North American academy during the Cold War, and that Cold War legacies continue to shape Caucasus Studies to this day. I conclude by offering three proposals for opening exchanges between the humanities and the social sciences within Caucasus Studies. More broadly, this essay argues for a rapprochement between the social sciences and philological inquiry vis-a-vis the Caucasus.

3 citations


Cites background from "The Political Aesthetic of the Medi..."

  • ...Similarly, only one substantial review of Kemper 2005—the most important history of the 19th century anti-Russian jihad and one of the most important works on Daghestan ever published—appeared in the journals that include the Caucasus within their mandate (see Gammer 2007)....

    [...]

  • ...Kemper, M. (2005), Herrschaft, Recht und Islam in Daghestan, Wiesbaden....

    [...]

  • ...R. Gould / Iran and the Caucasus 17 (2013) 275-293 285 pertise in Russian or the Soviet experience tend to assume that the life worlds and literary cultures of Daghestan and Tajikistan (for example) are closed to them, simply because they are unfamiliar with the Soviet Union....

    [...]

  • ...Having documented the death of Caucasus philology—which is to say the disappearance of the very possibility of rigorously engaging with the literary cultures of Azerbaijan, Armenia, Circassia, Daghestan, and Georgia from within the context of Caucasus Studies—what can I offer in the way of a solution?...

    [...]

  • ...…the relation between area studies and the decline of philology, see Pollock (forthcoming); and Gould 2012a. R. Gould / Iran and the Caucasus 17 (2013) 275-293 284 prior in Lahore and elsewhere in South Asia than with any of their proximate neighbours in Georgia or even Daghestan (Gould 2011, 2012)....

    [...]