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Dissertation

The Political Aspects of Ibn Khaldun's Study of Culture and History

24 Jul 2008-
TL;DR: El-Rayes as discussed by the authors provided a critical analysis of Ibn Khaldun's original introduction to his Kitab al-Ibar and explained the political objectives behind his concern with the study of history.
Abstract: Title of Dissertation: The Political Aspects of Ibn Khaldun’s Study of Culture and History Waseem El-Rayes, Doctor of Philosophy, 2008 Dissertation Directed By: Professor Charles E. Butterworth Department of Government and Politics The fourteenth-century scholar ‘Abd al-Rahmān Ibn Muhammad ibn Khaldun proclaims in his Muqaddima the establishment of a new science called the science of culture (‘ilm al-‘umrān). The primary subject of investigation of this science is aspects of human social organization. The ostensible purpose of this science is to provide historians with new analytical tools to verify historical reports. This dissertation provides a critical analysis of Ibn Khaldun’s original introduction to his Kitāb al-‘Ibar. Though my primary focus will be on the original introduction, my analysis will be informed and supported by the main text of the Muqaddima. The purpose of this analysis is to point out the political aspects of Ibn Khaldun’s science of culture and hence to explain the political objectives behind his concern with the study of history. THE POLITICAL ASPECTS OF IBN KHALDUN’S STUDY OF CULTURE AND HISTORY
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Book
01 Jan 1974
TL;DR: In this article, a concluding volume of the venture of islam, Marshall G. S. Hodgson describes the second flowering of Islam: the Safavi, Tmuri, and Ottoman empires.
Abstract: In this concluding volume of the venture of islam, Marshall G. S. Hodgson describes the second flowering of islam: the Safavi, Tmuri, and Ottoman empires. The final part of the volume analyzes the widespread islamic heritage in today's world.

409 citations

Book
01 Jan 1974
TL;DR: The classical age of Islam and the expansion of islam in the middle periods of Islam are discussed in this article, and the gunpowder empires and modern times are considered in this paper.
Abstract: V. 1. The classical age of Islam -- v. 2. The expansion of islam in the middle periods -- v. 3. The gunpowder empires and modern times.

400 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998

166 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Şerif Mardin1
TL;DR: The term used to refer to these attempts at national stereo-typing in the lingua franca of the Levant was Alia Turca behavior, an expression which has survived into modern Turkish.
Abstract: Few countries have been as frequently described in terms of national character as Turkey. Even the earliest observers of the Ottoman Empire appear anxious to set their findings into some generalized formula of the Turkish ethos. The term used to refer to these attempts at national stereo-typing in the lingua franca of the Levant was Alia Turca behavior, an expression which has survived into modern Turkish.

163 citations

MonographDOI
31 Jan 2021
TL;DR: The authors argues that the Islamic historical tradition arose not out of idle curiosity, or through imitation of antique models, but as a response to a variety of challenges facing the Islamic community during its first several centuries (ca. 7 to 10 centuries CE).
Abstract: How and why did Muslims first come to write their own history? The author argues in this work that the Islamic historical tradition arose not out of idle curiosity", or through imitation of antique models, but as a response to a variety of challenges facing the Islamic community during its first several centuries (ca. seventh to tenth centuries CE). The narratives that resulted focused on certain themes of Islamic origins, selected to legitimise particular aspects of the Islamic community and faith in one or another. These included the need to establish the status of Muhammad (d. 632) as prophet, to affirm that the community to which they belonged was the direct descendant of the original community founded by the Prophet, to explain Muslim hegemony over vast populations of non-Muslims in the rapidly growing Islamic empire, and to articulate different positions in the ongoing debate with the Islamic community itself over political and religious leadership. An examination of these key themes of early Islamic historiography and the issues generating them is placed in the context of other styles of legitimisation in the early Islamic community, including such methods as appeals to piety and genealogy. Narratives of Islamic Origins is a ground-breaking work that represents the first comprehensive tradition -- critical account of the origins and rise of Arab-Islamic historiography, and is essential reading for all historians of medieval Islamic history and civilisation, and for all those interested in the historiography of comparative civilisations.

137 citations