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The political Supreme Court

01 Jan 2012-
TL;DR: There are two parties in the United States, most decidedly opposed to each other as to the rights, powers and province of the judiciary as mentioned in this paper... One party almost claims infallibility for the judges, and would hedge them round about in such a manner that they cannot be reached by popular opinion at all.
Abstract: There are two parties in the United States, most decidedly opposed to each other as to the rights, powers and province of the judiciary. . . . One party almost claims infallibility for the judges, and would hedge them round about in such a manner that they cannot be reached by popular opinion at all, and . . . the other would subject them to the vacillations of popular prejudice and seemingly require it of them to define and administer the law, and interpret the Constitution, according to the real or apparent expediency of things. —NILES’ WEEKLY REGISTER (1822)
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the extent to which informal networks shape the decisions of the Supreme Court of the Philippines has been studied empirically, and it has been shown that informal networks can influence the decision making process of the court.
Abstract: To what extent do informal networks shape the decisions of the Supreme Court of the Philippines? Though often raised in the Philippines, this question has never been studied empirically. To answer ...

10 citations


Cites background from "The political Supreme Court"

  • ...Qualitative studies, by contrast, have offered rich contextual narratives of the dynamics underpinning how the Supreme Court of the Philippines functions from political–institutional (Agabin, 2012), historical–legal (Cruz, 2000), and investigative (Vitug, 2010, 2012) perspectives....

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  • ...…charges for betrayal of public trust and violation of the constitution6 – charges closely linked to corrupt behaviour and President Macapagal Arroyo’s appointments to the bench (2001–2010).7 Justices clearly have been closely tied to Philippine elites (Agabin, 2011, 2012; Pangalangan, 2014)....

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  • ...The Supreme Court of the Philippines has been central to the country’s political system since it was established in 1901 (see Agabin, 2012)....

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  • ...…(CJ), Renato Corono, for abuse of power, as well as the 2018 removal of CJ Sereno via a quo warranto instigated with support of factions on the bench, suggest that the court is still vulnerable to traditional personalized and patronage-based politics (Agabin, 2012: 1–30; Bonoan and Dressel, 2018)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the extent to which informal networks shape the decisions of the Supreme Court of the Philippines has been studied empirically, and it has been shown that informal networks can influence the decision making process of the court.
Abstract: To what extent do informal networks shape the decisions of the Supreme Court of the Philippines? Though often raised in the Philippines, this question has never been studied empirically. To answer ...

10 citations

Trending Questions (1)
Can the Supreme Court be considered a political organ?

Yes, the Supreme Court can be considered a political organ as there are two parties in the United States with opposing views on the role and powers of the judiciary.