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Journal ArticleDOI

The Politics of Territorialization: Regionalism, Localism and other isms … The Case of Montreal

01 May 2003-Journal of Urban Affairs (Blackwell Science Ltd)-Vol. 25, Iss: 2, pp 179-199
TL;DR: In a general context of state reforms, there is an emerging consensus on the strategic role of city-regions in the global economy as mentioned in this paper, and as such, state-led regional reform should be considered.
Abstract: In a general context of state reforms, there is an emerging consensus on the strategic role of city-regions in the global economy. As it is the case in other city-regions, state-led regional reform...
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106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Etherington et al. as mentioned in this paper argue that city-regions reinforce, and have the potential to increase, rather than resolve, uneven development and socio-spatial inequalities.
Abstract: Etherington D. and Jones M. City-regions: new geographies of uneven development and inequality, Regional Studies. Recent years have witnessed a burgeoning literature on the ‘new regionalism’. Protagonists have made persuasive arguments about regions as successful models of economic and social development. This paper argues that the championing of ‘city-regions’ provides an opportunity for taking these debates further. It draws on research taking place on the Sheffield City-Region, UK, and particularly discusses the interrelationships between competitiveness, work–welfare regimes – those policies and strategies dealing with labour market governance and welfare state restructuring – labour market inequalities and low pay. The paper suggests that city-regions reinforce, and have the potential to increase, rather than resolve, uneven development and socio-spatial inequalities. Etherington D. et Jones M. Les Cites-Regions: de nouvelles geographies du desequilibre et de l'inegalite, Regional Studies. Pendant le...

99 citations


Cites background from "The Politics of Territorialization:..."

  • ...Recent years have certainly witnessed a burgeoning literature on the ‘new regionalism’ in the social and political sciences (BOUDREAU, 2003; BRENNER et al., 2003; KEATING, 1998, 2001; KEATING et al., 2003; ROSSI, 2004; SÖDERBAUM, 2004; STORPER, 1997; VÄYRYNEN, 2003)....

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  • ...Recent years have certainly witnessed a burgeoning literature on the ‘new regionalism’ in the social and political sciences (B oudreau , 2003 ; B renner et al....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore space as the object of mobilization, rather than focusing on space as resource or constraint, or on the spatial configuration of actors within the organizational structure of a movement, and argue that new political spaces result not only from social movement activities, but also in a dynamic interaction between state and civil society actors.
Abstract: This paper explores space as the object of mobilization (rather than focusing on space as resource or constraint, or on the spatial configuration of actors within the organizational structure of a movement). In the context of state-restructuring processes, it is argued that new political spaces result not only from social movement activities (as in the drive for ‘free spaces’), but also in a dynamic interaction between state and civil society actors. The author asks what it takes to create a new, effective, and significant political space. Three elements are explored empirically and theoretically: the production of allegiance and legitimacy through spatial imaginaries, the instrumentalization of spatial practices and of the political culture, and the strategic use of spatial tools. In light of the case of Toronto, where a new regional political space eased the normalization of neoliberalism, it is concluded that new political spaces create the conditions for political exchange, but do not guarantee emanci...

92 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the degree to which divergence in voting behavior and political attitudes between inner cities and suburbs in Canadian metropolitan areas can be explained by place of residence and found that residents of inner cities in Canada became more likely to vote for parties of the left and to hold attitudes that would be considered on the left of the political spectrum, while suburban residents were increasingly likely to Vote Conservative or NDP.
Abstract: This article examines the degree to which divergence in voting behavior and political attitudes between inner cities and suburbs in Canadian metropolitan areas can be explained by place of residence. of of yet, there has been very little research done on this topic in Canada. Logistic regression models derived from the 1965, 1984 and 2000 Canadian national election surveys confirm that Canadian inner cities and (particularly, outer) suburbs are diverging, and place of residence has become increasingly important in explaining this divergence. Over the study period, residents of inner cities in Canada became more likely to vote for parties of the left and to hold attitudes that would be considered on the left of the political spectrum, while suburban residents were increasingly likely to vote for parties of the right and to hold attitudes on the right of the political spectrum. The research suggests that in Canada, as in the US, the place and context of suburbia is a factor in the shift to the right. This has implications for the future direction of welfare state policy.

86 citations


Cites background from "The Politics of Territorialization:..."

  • ...…right, this has been an underresearched area in Canadian urban studies and politics, historically only receiving attention in the literature on municipal politics and regional government (see Boudreau, 2000, 2003; Brownstone & Plunkett, 1983; Frisken, 1994, 2001; Graham, Phillips, & Maslove, 1998)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors show that the Musgrave-Samuelson analysis, which is valid for federal expenditures, need not apply to local expenditures, and restate the assumptions made by Musgrave and Samuelson and the central problems with which they deal.
Abstract: NE of the most important recent developments in the area of "applied economic theory" has been the work of Musgrave and Samuelson in public finance theory.2 The two writers agree on what is probably the major point under investigation, namely, that no "market type" solution exists to determine the level of expenditures on public goods. Seemingly, we are faced with the problem of having a rather large portion of our national income allocated in a "non-optimal" way when compared with the private sector. This discussion will show that the Musgrave-Samuelson analysis, which is valid for federal expenditures, need not apply to local expenditures. The plan of the discussion is first to restate the assumptions made by Musgrave and Samuelson and the central problems with which they deal. After looking at a key difference between the federal versus local cases, I shall present a simple model. This model yields a solution for the level of expenditures for local public goods which reflects the preferences of the population more adequately than they can be reflected at the national level. The assumptions of the model will then be relaxed to see what implications are involved. Finally, policy considerations will be discussed.

12,105 citations


"The Politics of Territorialization:..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Local cities compete with one another to attract residents, who vote with their feet if the balance between taxes and services does not satisfy them (Tiebout, 1956)....

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Book
Sidney Tarrow1
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The history of contention in social movements can be traced to the birth of the modern social movement as discussed by the authors, and the dynamics of social movements have been studied in the context of contention.
Abstract: Introduction 1 Contentious politics and social movements: Part I The Birth of the Modern Social Movement: 2 Modular collective action 3 Print and association 4 Statebuilding and social movements Part II From Contention to Social Movements: 5 Political opportunities and constraints 6 The repertoire of contention 7 Framing contention 8 Mobilising structures and contentious politics Part III The Dynamics of Movement: 9 Cycles of contention 10 Struggling to reform 11 Transnational contention/conclusion: the future of social movements

3,676 citations


"The Politics of Territorialization:..." refers background in this paper

  • ...I do not mean specific types of behavior (what Tarrow calls a repertoire of action) such as protest, sit-ins, etc. (Tarrow 1998)....

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Book
31 Oct 1997
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the evolution of regional specificities and the evolution and development of regional economies as relations and conventions, products, technologies, and territories in a region.
Abstract: Part 1. Regions as Relations and Conventions. The Resurgence of Regional Economies, Ten Years Later. Regional Economies as Relational Assets. Part 2. Evolution and Territorial Development. The Evolution of Regional Specificities. Crossing Industrial Divides in a Region. Part 3. Products, Technologies, and Territories. Innovation as Collective Action: Conventions, Products, Technologies, and Territories. Regional Worlds of Production: Conventions of Learning and Innovation in the Technology Districts of France, Italy, and the United States. Part 4. Globalization and Territorial Specificity. Territories, Flows, and Hierarchies in the Clobal Economy. he Limits to Globalization: Technology Districts and International Trade. The World of the City: Local Relations in a Global Economy. Part 5. Regional Institutions, Territorial Orders. Institutions of the Learning Economy. Conclusion: Technology, Firm Strategies, and Territorial Order.

2,332 citations

MonographDOI
01 Jan 1998

2,258 citations

01 Jan 1992

2,182 citations


"The Politics of Territorialization:..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Snow and Benford (1992) point out that a social movement’s success is easier when its discursive frame is in-line with the general discursive framework of other socio-political actors, providing resources to act contentiously (see also Diani, 1996)....

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