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Journal ArticleDOI

The Process of Meaning Making from Trauma Generated out of Sexual Abuse in Childhood

01 Sep 2016-Indian journal of positive psychology (Indian Association of Health, Research and Welfare)-Vol. 7, Iss: 3, pp 366-370
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the process of constructing meaning from the experience of being sexually abused in childhood and explore the dispositional characteristics to identify what helped them sustain the integrity of their sense of self and existence subsequent to intense sexual abuse that they had faced during their childhood.
Abstract: The study tries to explore the process of constructing meaning from the experience of being sexually abused in childhood. The focus of this study is to explore the dispositional characteristics to identify what helped them sustain the integrity of their sense of 'self' and 'existence' subsequent to intense sexual abuse that they had faced during their childhood. This study is part of a larger study in which the participants were selected through the use of a specially designed 'screening questionnaire' which sought information about the participants' life experiences and demographics in a subtle, non-invasive and non-threatening manner. The purpose of this study was to tap the unique and personal process of coping with a trauma of this stature. Three individuals participated in the present research and they shared their tribulations and unique process of coping with the researcher in an intensive interview that lasted for two hours and thirty minutes. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) approach was used to interpret the data. Significant themes that emerged after analysis were- the ability to focus one's psychic energy on alternative pursuits like career and academics, the capacity to obtain sustenance from relationships, the inner strength to free oneself from the vicious cycle of anger and vengeance and to look beyond; practising forgiveness and the ability to consider each experience as learning. Thus the common point in the process of meaning making is the ability of all these persons to make use of the positive repertoire of personality.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a scoping review was conducted by searching relevant journals and several online databases such as EbscoHost, Scopus, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar.
Abstract: Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a complex and prevalent problem with devastating long-term consequences for survivors. Despite these consequences, some survivors seem to find a source of meaning and fulfillment throughout their recovery process, which may facilitate resilience and posttraumatic growth (PTG). However, little is known from the literature about the specific meaning making mechanisms that CSA survivors experience. A scoping review was conducted by searching relevant journals and several online databases such as EbscoHost, Scopus, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar. Studies published in English and that discussed meaning making as a topic of recovery from CSA in the context of women survivors’ experiences were included, where a total of 57 articles were selected including qualitative (n = 32), quantitative (n = 9), mixed method (n = 9), and review (n = 7) articles. Using thematic analysis, the results of the scoping review found four mechanisms of meaning making and seven sources of meaning describing the meaning making processes of women survivors of CSA. The mechanisms were identified as being benevolent; restoring and empowering the inner self; mobilizing external and social resources; and lastly actively integrating the trauma narrative. This study contributes toward the global knowledge base on meaning making mechanisms of women survivors of CSA by providing the first known summary of studies to date. Future research is recommended to further confirm these findings to inform treatment interventions for women survivors of CSA.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the male survivors of sexual assault have largely been neglected in the literature, being traditionally considered “normalized” and being considered to be “easy to handle.
Abstract: Background:Victims of sexual abuse face unique emotional challenges. Among them, the male survivors of sexual assault have largely been neglected in the literature, being traditionally considered “...

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A qualitative case study was conducted using an autobiographic memoir that provides an in-depth personal narrative of one woman's experience of trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, the posttraumatic helping environment, and healing journey as mentioned in this paper .
Abstract: This paper focuses on social work’s understanding of how posttraumatic counselling may help or hinder recovery from trauma. A qualitative case study was conducted using an autobiographic memoir that provides an in-depth personal narrative of one woman’s experience of trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, the posttraumatic helping environment, and healing journey. Inductive thematic analysis uncovered themes that align with the existing literature. Novel or understudied aspects for consideration also emerged, including the importance of psychoeducation, behavioural activation, and secondary factors related to the posttraumatic environment that impede healing. The analysis highlighted missed opportunities to clinically address issues of identity and meaning in a spiritually sensitive manner. Although the narrator made it clear to helping professionals that she was struggling with religious beliefs and was in spiritual crisis, helping professionals seemed to eschew exploration of these concerns. Implications for clinical social work practice and future research are discussed.
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: In this article, an integrated existential framework for trauma theory is presented, based on the clustering of current trauma theories into physical, relational, and intrapersonal categories, and the relation of these three clusters to Irvine Yalom's ultimate existential concerns of life/death, connection/isolation, and freedom/responsibility.
Abstract: In this paper, an integrated existential framework for trauma theory is presented. The framework is based on the clustering of current trauma theories into physical, relational, and intrapersonal categories, and the relation of these three clusters to Irvine Yalom’s ultimate existential concerns of life/death, connection/isolation, and freedom/responsibility. Recent research has revealed an interplay between the physiological and psychosocial aspects of traumatic experiences, suggesting that a theoretical integration which includes consideration of physiological change, fear conditioning, and relational impacts is required to fully address the impacts of trauma. The fourth existential concern, meaning/meaninglessness, is argued to underlie all of the aspects of trauma, forming a common connection between all theories. This paper undertakes a brief review of current theories in traumatology to illustrate the validity of the three theoretical clusters, explores the current application of existential theory to the conceptualization of trauma, and presents a unifying organizational framework for trauma theory based in existentialism. Critiques of theory integration and existentialism are explored, followed by an analysis of risks for existential theory in the application of this framework. Implications for future research and social work practice based on the existential framework are also presented.