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The Psalms: A Commentary

01 Oct 1962-
TL;DR: Weiser's commentary on The Psalms sums up a generation of sympathetic work upon the Psalter as mentioned in this paper and is characterized throughout by a deep and warm sense of the abiding spiritual inheritance which the hymns of Israel's worship have provided both for Jew and Christian throughout the ages.
Abstract: We have left until last what bids fair to become one of the two or three Old Testament books of the year (von Rad's Genesis is probably another). Weiser's commentary on The Psalms sums up a generation of sympathetic work upon the Psalter. In the Preface we have a consideration of the work associated with Gunkel and Mowinckel. Each Psalm is given in a new translation with short notes underneath, and then followed by a full theological exposition. It is the expositions that will be most helpful to the parish priest and the minister of religion. Weiser is able to date many of the Psalms a good deal earlier than has been fashionable of late. but his significant contribution is in his interpretation of the theological ideas of the writers. Those who use the Psalms regularly will be particularly grateful for this valuable commentary' (View Review). 'The commentary is characterized throughout by a deep and warm sense of the abiding spiritual inheritance which the hymns of Israel's worship have provided both for Jew and Christian throughout the ages' (Times Literary Supplement).
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01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The origin of the ESCHATOLOGICAL FEAST as a wedding banquet in the SYNOPTIC GOSPels and its role in the development of language and culture are studied in an qualitative study.
Abstract: The Problem. The problem this dissertation seeks to address is the origins of the wedding banquet imagery in the teaching of Jesus. Frequently, scholars will state that the image of a wedding banquet was a common messianic image in the first century. However, other than Isa 25:6-8, sources for the image of a banquet for the messianic age in the Hebrew Bible are sparse. Yet the image of a banquet clearly appears in the Synoptic Gospels in both the actions of Jesus as well as his teaching. Because the metaphor of a wedding banquet is not found in the literature of the Second Temple Period, scholars frequently assume that this sort of language was created by the Gospel writers and that Jesus himself did not claim to be a bridegroom. Method. In this study I propose an intertextuality method which seeks to give full weight to the rhetorical value of anauthor's use of earlier texts or traditions. First, the reader must first "hear an echo" within the text. By this I mean one recognizes something in the words or deeds of Jesus that sounds like a text or tradition from the Hebrew Bible. Second, having heard the echo of an earlier text or tradition, one must then determine which texts and traditions may have been used by the author. Since allusions to tradition are not direct citations, a wide range of texts must be gathered with linguistic and thematic links to the later text. Third, these observations drawn from the Hebrew Bible and Second Temple Period literature must be applied to the texts in the Synoptic Gospels which contain banquet or wedding imagery. This third step can be used as a test of the authenticity of the sayings of Jesus. I propose a "criterion of tradition congruence": If it is shown that a saying of Jesus stands within well-known traditions from the Hebrew Bible, then that saying is more likely to be authentic. Conclusion. Jesus did indeed claim to be a bridegroom and his ministry was an anticipation of the eschatological banquet. While there is no single text in the Hebrew Bible or the literature of the Second Temple Period which states the "messiah is like a bridegroom," the elements for such a claim are present in several traditions found in this literature. Jesus created this unique image by clustering three traditions drawn from the Hebrew Bible and applying them to his ministry. First, the eschatological age is inaugurated by a banquet eaten in the presence of God (Isa 25:6-8). Second, the end of the exile is often described as a new Exodus and a new journey through the wilderness (Isa 40-55). Third, the relationship of God and his people is often described as a marriage (Hosea, Jer 2-4). Jesus claimed that his ministry was an on-going wedding celebration which signals the end of the Exile and the restoration of Israel to her position as the Lord's beloved wife. Jesus himself combined the tradition of an eschatological banquet with a marriage metaphor in order to describe the end of the Exile as a wedding banquet.

126 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the passage of the "SON" in the letter to the "Anchor of the SOUL that ENTERS within the veil".
Abstract: “THE ANCHOR OF THE SOUL THAT ENTERS WITHIN THE VEIL”: THE ASCENSION OF THE “SON” IN THE LETTER TO THE HEBREWS

89 citations

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: Theology of JUDGMENT in GENESIS 6-9 and as discussed by the authors 6-10..., 6-11, 6-12, 7-9.
Abstract: THEOLOGY OF JUDGMENT IN GENESIS 6-9

78 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the historical attitudes towards aging body and longevity within the Christian tradition, paying particular attention to shifts in attitude regarding aging and decay, and examine the Christian discipline of fasting as practiced by the Desert Fathers, who believed that an attenuated rate of aging was one physiological outcome subsumed under a larger moral project of character transformation.
Abstract: In this thesis I offer a theological analysis of biomedical efforts to extend the healthy human lifespan by attenuating the aging process, situating this project within the Christian quest to holiness. The potential of even modestly extended life spans has profound social, familial, political, economic, religious, and environmental implications, and warrants considerable theological reflection, hitherto largely absent from contemporary ethical discussion. Hence, I critique the biomedical attempt to extend human life via aging retardation by considering the historical attitudes towards one’s aging body and longevity within the Christian tradition, paying particular attention to shifts in attitude regarding aging and decay, and by examining the Christian discipline of fasting as practiced by the Desert Fathers, who believed that an attenuated rate of aging was one physiological outcome (among others) subsumed under a larger moral project of character transformation. While the concept of a normative lifespan as derived from Scripture is highly tenuous, a relationship between finitude and a wisdom that recognizes one’s bodily limits does emerge. While key figures in the history of the Church have acknowledged both the difficulties of earthly life and the promise of bodily resurrection leading to a general ambivalence concerning the length of life and its extension, such attitudes were challenged by Francis Bacon and mirrored during the theological upheavals of the Great Awakenings in America. Drawing upon the work of Charles Taylor and Thomas R. Cole, I discuss the theological shifts whereby spiritual growth was segregated from physical aging via an increasingly instrumental stance towards aging and its mutability, increasing one’s fear of death. In the remainder of the thesis I examine St. Antony’s ascetic regime which enabled him to ‘remake’ his body as part of reordering and refining his soul to be the leader of his body, a regime which entailed an attenuated rate of aging. Drawing upon Karl Barth’s christological anthropology who locates the unity and order of soul and body in the person of Jesus Christ, I demonstrate how current attempts to retard aging exacerbate the ‘disorder’ and segregation of body and soul, described as ‘sloth’ and ‘care,’ negating the role of the body and its limitedness in the formation of one’s soul, and failing to mitigate the fear of death occasioned by such a disorder. Finally, I situate the Christian discipline of fasting as an alternative to life extension within the context of the practices of faith communities, understood minimally as baptism and the Lord’s Supper.

74 citations