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The Reconquest of Montreal: Language Policy and Social Change in a Bilingual City

27 Jun 1990-
TL;DR: A map of Montreal can be found in this paper, where the authors discuss the history of the Quiet Revolution and the Politicization of Language in Montreal and the role of Francophones in this process.
Abstract: A Note on Vocabulary Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Note to the Paperback Edition Map of Montreal 1. Introduction 2. An English City: Montreal before the Quiet Revolution Urban Growth and Linguistic Diversity, 1760-1960 * Linguistic Geography and the Two Solitudes * Language Use and Language Choice through 1960 * Language and the Economy: Historical Patterns * The Politics of Language through 1960 * Language Policy before 1960 * Urban Governance and Linguistic Accommodation * The Winds of Change: Language and Politics in the 1950s 3. The Quiet Revolution and the Politicization of Language The Roots of the Quiet Revolution * Linguistic Tensions and the Quiet Revolution * Francophone Demands for a Government Language Policy, 1960-1966 * The Anglicization of Immigrants * The Political Ramifications of Immigrant Anglicization 4. Linguistic Crises and Policy Responses, 1967-1969 Policy Response I: Bill 85 * Conflicts Become Crises: Linguistic Battles of 1969 * Policy Response II: Bill 63 * Language and the Restructuring of School Governance * Conclusion 5. A Polarized City, 1970-1976 Montreal 1970: A City in Turmoil * The Federal Government and Montreal's Language Question * Holding Action, 1970-1973 * Bourassa Prepares to Act * Bill 22: A Policy Disaster * Conclusion 6. Bill 101 and the Politics of Language, 1977-1989 The PQ Enacts a Language Policy * Anglophones and Bill 101 * Conflicts and Compromises in Language Policy, 1979-1985 * Bourassa Reignites the Language Question, 1985-1989 * The Impact of Bill 101: Education * Conclusion 7. Public Policy, Language, and the Montreal Economy, 1960-1989 The Quebec State and Francophone Economic Development * State Corporations and Francophone Economic Development * The Linguistic Impact of Public Works * Closing the Linguistic Education Gap * Language Policy and Regulation of the Private Sector * Conclusion 8. The Francisation of the Montreal Economy The Language of the Workplace * The Control of Capital * The Socioeconomic Status of Francophones * The External Face of Business * Public Policy, Market Forces, and Economic Change * Conclusion 9. English and French in the New Montreal Linguistic Demography, 1971-1986 * The End of the Two Solitudes? * The New Ethnicity and Francophone Montreal * The New Francophone Class Structure * Whither the Language Question Notes Index
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Book
Charles Boberg1
26 Aug 2010
TL;DR: The authors provide a framework for original studies of English, both present-day and past, and provide theoretical and descriptive contributions to our knowledge of national varities of English language, both written and spoken.
Abstract: Studies in english language. The aim of this series is to provide a framework for original studies of English, both present-day and past. All books are based surely on empirical research, and represent theoretical and descriptive contributions to our knowledge of national varities of English, both written and spoken. The series covers a broad range of topics and approaches, including syntax, phonology, grammar, vocabulary, discourse, pragmatics and sociolinguistics, and is aimed at an international readership.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The transformation of metropolitan governance cannot be understood without adopting a double reading frame referring on the one hand to the actual content of policies aimed at the metropolitan scale, their raison d'etre, the macroeconomic logics that underlie them, and on the other hand, the configurations of actors and institutions which evolved strongly in the last 20 years as mentioned in this paper.

73 citations

Book
29 Mar 2004
TL;DR: This paper examined the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.
Abstract: Paris mushroomed in the thirteenth century to become the largest city in the Western world, largely through in-migration from rural areas. The resulting dialect-mixture led to the formation of new, specifically urban modes of speech. From the time of the Renaissance social stratification became sharper as the elites distanced themselves from the Parisian 'Cockney' of the masses. Nineteenth-century urbanisation transformed the situation yet again with the arrival of huge numbers of immigrants from far-flung corners of France, levelling dialect-differences and exposing ever larger sections of the population to standardising influences. At the same time, a working-class vernacular emerged which was distinguished from the upper-class standard not only in grammar and pronunciation but most markedly in vocabulary (slang). This book examines the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discuss a strategy of Reversal of Language Shift (RLS) employed by speakers of Mam (Maya), an endangered language of Guatemala, and compare their attitudes toward codeswitching in relation to how many years of formal education they have had.
Abstract: Since 1991, Fishman has carved out a new area of focus for research and linguistic activism—the Reversal of Language Shift (RLS)—within the general field of the Sociology of Language. In this article, I discuss a strategy of RLS employed by speakers of Mam (Maya), an endangered language of Guatemala. Less‐educated Mam routinely codeswitch to Spanish, which I present within Myers‐Scotton’s Markedness Model of codeswitching (1993), while educated speakers categorically do not. Communication Accommodation Theory (Giles and Powesland 1975) offers a framework for accounting for this contrastive behavior through consideration of convergence and divergence strategies aimed at constructing positive social identities (Tajfel 1974). I briefly illustrate this codeswitching behavior in four abridged narrative texts and compare speakers’ attitudes toward codeswitching in relation to how many years of formal education they have had. I suggest that the initiative of Mam teachers in “purifying the language” is supportive...

44 citations