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Journal ArticleDOI

The Reconquest of Montreal: Language Policy and Social Change in a Bilingual City.

01 May 1991-Contemporary Sociology-Vol. 20, Iss: 3, pp 370
About: This article is published in Contemporary Sociology.The article was published on 1991-05-01. It has received 94 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Social change & Language policy.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The transformation of metropolitan governance cannot be understood without adopting a double reading frame referring on the one hand to the actual content of policies aimed at the metropolitan scale, their raison d'etre, the macroeconomic logics that underlie them, and on the other hand, the configurations of actors and institutions which evolved strongly in the last 20 years as mentioned in this paper.

73 citations


Cites methods from "The Reconquest of Montreal: Languag..."

  • ...As Levine (1990) indicates, Montreal used to be the center of English Canada, but the economic, political, and cultural rise of Francophones changed power relations with Anglo-Montrealers who gradually started to act as a minority in the city and the province....

    [...]

Book
29 Mar 2004
TL;DR: This paper examined the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.
Abstract: Paris mushroomed in the thirteenth century to become the largest city in the Western world, largely through in-migration from rural areas. The resulting dialect-mixture led to the formation of new, specifically urban modes of speech. From the time of the Renaissance social stratification became sharper as the elites distanced themselves from the Parisian 'Cockney' of the masses. Nineteenth-century urbanisation transformed the situation yet again with the arrival of huge numbers of immigrants from far-flung corners of France, levelling dialect-differences and exposing ever larger sections of the population to standardising influences. At the same time, a working-class vernacular emerged which was distinguished from the upper-class standard not only in grammar and pronunciation but most markedly in vocabulary (slang). This book examines the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the Quebecois citizenship presently developed is anchored in a homogenised notion of cultural belonging, as the Quebec state is attempting to define a 'universal' national identity that would subordinate all others.
Abstract: This paper focuses on the well-orchestrated and much publicised project regarding the construction and implementation by the Quebec state of a citoyennetequebecoise. This endeavour is viewed here as the most recent phase of a process of boundary definition that began with the Quiet Revolution in the early 1960s, and that proceeded from the cultural definition of an ethnic nation to a pluralist conception of the territory, and then from a pluralist definition of the community to the present elaboration of a specifically Quebecois citizenship, which merges here with nationality. In spite of a shift from a cultural to a territorially based definition of the community, I argue that the citizenship presently developed is anchored in a homogenised notion of cultural belonging, as the Quebec state is attempting to define a 'universal' national identity that would subordinate all others. The national model of citizenship is preferred over the postnational, the republican over the pluralist, the undifferentiated o...

56 citations


Cites background from "The Reconquest of Montreal: Languag..."

  • ...These elites and English-speaking capitalists agreed the latter would keep control over economic matters (Levine, 1990)....

    [...]

Book
18 May 2020
TL;DR: This article used a grant from the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, through the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program, using funds provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.
Abstract: This book has been published with the help of a grant from the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, through the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program, using funds provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

48 citations

Book
04 Jun 2015
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that while policy, fiscal approach, and political decentralization can, indeed, be peace-preserving at times, the effects of these institutions are conditioned by traits of the societies they (are meant to) govern.
Abstract: There is no one-size-fits-all decentralized fix to deeply divided and conflict-ridden states. One of the hotly debated policy prescriptions for states facing self-determination demands is some form of decentralized governance - including regional autonomy arrangements and federalism - which grants minority groups a degree of self-rule. Yet the track record of existing decentralized states suggests that these have widely divergent capacity to contain conflicts within their borders. Through in-depth case studies of Chechnya, Punjab and Quebec, as well as a statistical cross-country analysis, this book argues that while policy, fiscal approach, and political decentralization can, indeed, be peace-preserving at times, the effects of these institutions are conditioned by traits of the societies they (are meant to) govern. Decentralization may help preserve peace in one country or in one region, but it may have just the opposite effect in a country or region with different ethnic and economic characteristics.

47 citations