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Journal ArticleDOI

The Regulations of the People's Republic of China Concerning Punishments for Disturbing Order: The Police and Administrative Punishment

01 Sep 1989-Criminal Justice Review (SAGE Publications)-Vol. 14, Iss: 2, pp 154-165
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper trace the development of this legislation from 1914 to the present, showing how the violations involved have reflected the concerns of the government of the time, and demonstrate that even as police have been given the right to inflict harsher punishments, they have also been subjected to greater accountability and control.
Abstract: Since 1914, China has had legislation permitting the police to punish minor violations administratively, that is, without obtaining a judgment of guilt from a court; penalties include fines and short periods of detention. This article traces the development of this legislation from 1914 to the present, showing how the violations involved have reflected the concerns of the government of the time. It demonstrates that, even as police have been given the right to inflict harsher punishments, they have also been subjected to greater accountability and control.
Citations
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01 Jun 2011
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper discussed the drawbacks of the present police pledge and community policing practices and discussed an integrated social control model for practicing police social service work in China, and concluded that a model that integrates both informal and formal social control strategies should be adopted for providing social service to the community while China undergoes continuous reform.
Abstract: The paper is an attempt to understand police social service work in the context of community policing in China. It first describes the key philosophy underlying community policing in China. The paper explains that the mass line ideology, which demands that the police serve people wholeheartedly, is still dominant. Based on a review of historical development of police social service work, this paper points out drawbacks of the present police pledge and community policing practices and discusses an integrated social control model for practicing police social service work in China. It concludes that a model that integrates both informal and formal social control strategies should be adopted for providing social service work to the community while China undergoes continuous reform.

15 citations


Cites background from "The Regulations of the People's Rep..."

  • ...They knew the names, occupations, and appearance, as well as the needs and difficulties, of a large part of the population (Bracey, 1989; Johnson, 1986)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, the authors describes imprisonment in China and examines some of the contexts in which it can be considered, including harsh detention practices, non-jural punishments, and the death penalty.
Abstract: Despite some evidence to the contrary, imprisonment in the People's Republic of China has been characterized as generally humane and rehabilitation-oriented. Cross-cultural comparisons, however, make conclusions tenuous because prison may not have the same precise meaning across national boundaries. This paper describes imprisonment in China and attempts to examine some of the contexts in which it can be considered. Along with humane and treatment-oriented prisons, the Chinese employ a variety of interventions including harsh detention practices, nonjural punishments, and the death penalty. The frequency with which these alternatives are used makes comparisons with American prisons difficult. Understanding is also complicated by the fact that social control practices in China have been shaped by the unique combination of Confucian and socialist ideology and practice. The study of Chinese social control can provide insight into the general problems of conducting cross-cultural research.

3 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The People's Republic of China (PRC) as mentioned in this paper was the first country to achieve the goal of overthrowing the rule of imperialism, feudalism and bureaucrat capitalism in China.
Abstract: China is one of the countries with the longest histories in the world. The people of all nationalities in China have jointly created a splendid culture and have a glorious revolutionary tradition. Feudal China was gradually reduced after 1840 to a semi-colonial and semi-feudal country. The Chinese people waged wave upon wave of heroic struggles for national independence and liberation and for democracy and freedom. Great and earth-shaking historical changes have taken place in China in the 20th century. The Revolution of 1911, led by Dr Sun Yat-sen, abolished the feudal monarchy and gave birth to the Republic of China. But the Chinese people had yet to fulfil their historical task of overthrowing imperialism and feudalism. After waging hard, protracted and tortuous struggles, armed and otherwise, the Chinese people of all nationalities led by the Communist Party of China with Chairman Mao Zedong as its leader ultimately, in 1949, overthrew the rule of imperialism, feudalism and bureaucrat capitalism, won the great victory of the new-democratic revolution and founded the People's Republic of China. Thereupon the Chinese people took state power into their own hands and became masters of the country.

279 citations

Book
03 Aug 1978
TL;DR: Li as discussed by the authors explores the differences in the tradition and operation of law in these two cultures and gives us both an invaluable understanding of Chinese society today and his own appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of U.S. law, lawyers, and courts.
Abstract: The U.S. has 400,000 lawyers in a society of 200 million people. China, a country with four times that population, has a mere 3,500 lawyers. How do the Chinese achieve law without lawyers? Victor Li, one of the world's leading authorities on Chinese law, explores the way the Chinese and U.S. systems have historically viewed law (and still view it), and the way each system functions in everyday life to shape conduct and control deviance. In a straightforward and highly readable manner, the author examines how these highly divergent societies operate. He writes about historical forces and cultural values that are centuries old—and that are still critical influences in shaping life in modern America and China. In explaining the differences in the tradition and operation of law in these two cultures, Li gives us both an invaluable understanding of Chinese society today and his own appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of U.S. law, lawyers, and courts.

32 citations

01 Jan 1973

13 citations