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Journal ArticleDOI

The Role of School in Adolescents’ Identity Development. A Literature Review

01 Mar 2019-Educational Psychology Review (Springer US)-Vol. 31, Iss: 1, pp 35-63
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a literature review on the role of school in adolescents' identity development from different research fields and to provide schools and teachers with insights into how adolescents’ identity development can be supported.
Abstract: Schools can play an important role in adolescents’ identity development. To date, research on the role of school in adolescents’ identity development is scattered across research fields that employ different theoretical perspectives on identity. The aim of this literature review was to integrate the findings on the role of school in adolescents’ identity development from different research fields and to provide schools and teachers with insights into how adolescents’ identity development can be supported. Using constant comparative analysis, 111 studies were analyzed. We included articles on personal and social identity and on school-related identity dimensions. Three groups of studies emerged. First, studies on how schools and teachers unintentionally impact adolescents’ identity showed that, at school, messages may unintentionally be communicated to adolescents concerning who they should or can be through differentiation and selection, teaching strategies, teacher expectations, and peer norms. Second, studies on how schools and teachers can intentionally support adolescents’ identity development showed that different types of explorative learning experiences can be organized to support adolescents’ identity development: experiences aimed at exploring new identity positions (in-breadth exploration), further specifying already existing self-understandings (in-depth exploration), and reflecting on self-understandings (reflective exploration). The third group suggests that explorative learning experiences must be meaningful and situated in a supportive classroom climate in order to foster adolescents’ identity development. Together, the existing studies suggest that schools and teachers are often unaware of the many different ways in which they may significantly impact adolescents’ identity development.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review illuminates the growing body of funds of identity (FoI) scholarship and explores its contribution to breaking down deficit thinking and enhancing the inclusivity and equity of education.
Abstract: This review illuminates the growing body of funds of identity (FoI) scholarship and explores its contribution to breaking down deficit thinking and enhancing the inclusivity and equity of education...

34 citations


Cites background from "The Role of School in Adolescents’ ..."

  • ...How could an FoI approach foster students’ identity exploration and development, allow change and take up of new perspectives, and nurture students’ sense of agency and empowerment (Verhoeven et al., 2019)?...

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  • ...For instance, how might this support students to achieve personal and societal transformation? How could an FoI approach foster students’ identity exploration and development, allow change and take up of new perspectives, and nurture students’ sense of agency and empowerment (Verhoeven et al., 2019)?...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that teachers of color increase school success for students of color, but little attention has been paid to whether school attendance behaviors also increase from same race and ethnicity matches. To ad...
Abstract: Teachers of color increase school success for students of color. Yet, little attention has been paid to whether school attendance behaviors also increase from same race and ethnicity matches. To ad...

15 citations


Cites background from "The Role of School in Adolescents’ ..."

  • ...In fact, one study argued that messages at school were unintentionally commu nicated to adolescents concerning who they should or could be through “differentiation and selection, teaching strategies, teacher expecta tions, and peer norms” (Verhoeven et al., 2019, p. 35)....

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DOI
02 Sep 2020
TL;DR: Nandika et al. as mentioned in this paper used a quasi-experimental method with a pre-test and post-test control group research design to develop academic self-concepts of students at the SMAN (Sekolah Menengah Atas Negeri or Public Senior High School) 4 Bandung, West Java, Indonesia, in Academic Year 2019/2020 compared to conventional learning.
Abstract: Education aims to develop the full potential of a person to become a complete human being. The most important thing is that actualization of potential can be obtained if someone has a self-concept. The relationship between self-concept and current education can be seen in the purpose of education. The success of students in following the education and learning process in schools is greatly influenced by their academic self-concept. One method of learning that can be done by teachers in schools in developing students' academic self-concepts through the application of the SDL (Self-Directed Learning) model. This study departs from the issue of the self-directed learning model effective in developing the academic self-concept of class XI students at the SMAN (Sekolah Menengah Atas Negeri or Public Senior High School) 4 Bandung, West Java, Indonesia, in Academic Year 2019/2020 compared to conventional learning. This study uses a quasi-experimental method with a pre-test and post-test control group research design. The instrument used was an academic self-concept questionnaire by expressing three aspects, namely: the ability self-concept, achievement self-concept, and class self-concept. The population in this study were students of class XI at the SMAN 4 Bandung as many as 320 students with a sample of students in class XI MIPA (Matematika dan Ilmu Pengetahuan Alam or Mathematics and Natural Sciences) 6 of 29 students as an experimental class and students of XI MIPA 2 of 29 students as control classes. The results showed that the self-directed learning model was effective in developing students' academic self-concepts compared to conventional learning. From the results of this study, it can be recommended to teachers and researchers, further, that the model of self-directed learning can be a reference as an effort to help students to develop academic self-concepts. KEY WORDS: Self-Directed Learning Model; Academic Self-Concept; Conventional Learning. About the Author: Kania Nandika, S.Pd. is a Master Student at the Study Program of Educational Psychology SPS UPI (School of Postgraduate, Indonesia University of Education), Jalan Dr. Setiabudhi No.229 Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. For academic interests, the Author is able to be contacted via e-mail address at: kanianandika92@gmail.com Suggested Citation: Nandika, Kania. (2020). “Self-Directed Learning Model to Develop Academic Self-Concepts of Class XI Students in 2019/2020 Academic Year” in EDUCARE: International Journal for Educational Studies , Volume 13(1), August, pp.61-80. Bandung, Indonesia: Minda Masagi Press owned by ASPENSI with ISSN 1979-7877 (print) and ISSN 2621-587X (online). Article Timeline: Accepted (June 1, 2020); Revised (July 3, 2020); and Published (August 30, 2020).

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article assessed the effects of Transformative Dialogic Literature Teaching (TDLT) intervention on 15-year-old students' insight into human nature, eudaimonic reasons for reading, use of reading strategies, and motivation for literature education.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The study indicates that factors other than cumulative trauma are important for the development of CPTSD in adolescence, and interventions targeting adolescent’s social environment both at home and at school may be beneficial.
Abstract: Background: Chronic and repeated trauma are well-established risk factors for complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) in adult samples Less is known about how trauma history and other factor

11 citations

References
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Book
12 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The Discovery of Grounded Theory as mentioned in this paper is a book about the discovery of grounded theories from data, both substantive and formal, which is a major task confronting sociologists and is understandable to both experts and laymen.
Abstract: Most writing on sociological method has been concerned with how accurate facts can be obtained and how theory can thereby be more rigorously tested. In The Discovery of Grounded Theory, Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss address the equally Important enterprise of how the discovery of theory from data--systematically obtained and analyzed in social research--can be furthered. The discovery of theory from data--grounded theory--is a major task confronting sociology, for such a theory fits empirical situations, and is understandable to sociologists and laymen alike. Most important, it provides relevant predictions, explanations, interpretations, and applications. In Part I of the book, "Generation Theory by Comparative Analysis," the authors present a strategy whereby sociologists can facilitate the discovery of grounded theory, both substantive and formal. This strategy involves the systematic choice and study of several comparison groups. In Part II, The Flexible Use of Data," the generation of theory from qualitative, especially documentary, and quantitative data Is considered. In Part III, "Implications of Grounded Theory," Glaser and Strauss examine the credibility of grounded theory. The Discovery of Grounded Theory is directed toward improving social scientists' capacity for generating theory that will be relevant to their research. While aimed primarily at sociologists, it will be useful to anyone Interested In studying social phenomena--political, educational, economic, industrial-- especially If their studies are based on qualitative data.

53,267 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Identity in practice, modes of belonging, participation and non-participation, and learning communities: a guide to understanding identity in practice.
Abstract: This book presents a theory of learning that starts with the assumption that engagement in social practice is the fundamental process by which we get to know what we know and by which we become who we are. The primary unit of analysis of this process is neither the individual nor social institutions, but the informal 'communities of practice' that people form as they pursue shared enterprises over time. To give a social account of learning, the theory explores in a systematic way the intersection of issues of community, social practice, meaning, and identity. The result is a broad framework for thinking about learning as a process of social participation. This ambitious but thoroughly accessible framework has relevance for the practitioner as well as the theoretician, presented with all the breadth, depth, and rigor necessary to address such a complex and yet profoundly human topic.

30,397 citations


"The Role of School in Adolescents’ ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Scholars adopting sociocultural perspectives understand a person’s identity to develop through this person’s participation in various sociocultural contexts, such as home, school and work (e.g., Holland et al., 1998; Holland & Lave, 1991; Wenger, 1998)....

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  • ...In other words, adolescents’ identities connect their past, present and future (Holland et al., 1998; Wenger, 1998)....

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Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: The Eye of Power: A Discussion with Maoists as mentioned in this paper discusses the politics of health in the Eighteenth Century, the history of sexuality, and the Confession of the Flesh.
Abstract: * On Popular Justice: A Discussion with Maoists * Prison Talk * Body/ Power * Questions on Georgraphy * Two Lectures * Truth and Power * Power and Strategies * The Eye of Power * The Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century * The history of Sexuality * The Confession of the Flesh

15,638 citations

Book
01 Jan 1968
TL;DR: Erikson as mentioned in this paper describes a process that is located both in the core of the individual and in the inner space of the communal culture, and discusses the connection between individual struggles and social order.
Abstract: Identity, Erikson writes, is an unfathomable as it is all-pervasive. It deals with a process that is located both in the core of the individual and in the core of the communal culture. As the culture changes, new kinds of identity questions arise-Erikson comments, for example, on issues of social protest and changing gender roles that were particular to the 1960s. Representing two decades of groundbreaking work, the essays are not so much a systematic formulation of theory as an evolving report that is both clinical and theoretical. The subjects range from "creative confusion" in two famous lives-the dramatist George Bernard Shaw and the philosopher William James-to the connection between individual struggles and social order. "Race and the Wider Identity" and the controversial "Womanhood and the Inner Space" are included in the collection.

14,906 citations


"The Role of School in Adolescents’ ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Discovering who you are and want to be is understood to require some courage, because it may involve risks and discomfort; it is accompanied by new experiences and change (Erikson, 1968; Kroger, 2007; Marcia, 1993; Sinai et al., 2012)....

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  • ...In the process of commitment, adolescents are thought to make durable life decisions, for example when it comes to their education, profession, and worldview (Erikson, 1968; Marcia, 1993)....

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  • ...Here, it should be noted that identity exploration, which is understood by scholars who adopt a psychosocial perspective on identity development as the questioning of already present identifications through triggering frictions and some discomfort that allow for the (re-)evaluation of childhood identifications (Erikson 1968; Kroger 2007; Marcia 1993; Sinai et al. 2012), does not necessarily exclude the possibility of relating adolescents’ personal lives to school and vice versa....

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  • ...…of already present identifications through triggering frictions and some discomfort that allow for the (re-)evaluation of childhood identifications (Erikson, 1968; Kroger, 2007; Marcia, 1993; Sinai et al., 2012), does not necessarily exclude the possibility of relating adolescents’ personal lives…...

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Trending Questions (1)
Do adolescents develop identity through school performance?

The answer to the query is not explicitly mentioned in the paper. The word "school" is mentioned in the paper, but it is used in the context of how schools and teachers can support adolescents' identity development through explorative learning experiences. The paper discusses the unintentional and intentional impacts of schools and teachers on adolescents' identity development, but it does not specifically address whether adolescents develop identity through school performance.