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The Rule of Freedom: Liberalism and the Modern City.

01 Jan 2003-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the impersonal, often invisible forms of social direction and control built into the infrastructure of modern life and the ways in which these mechanisms both shape culture and social life and engender popular resistance.
Abstract: The liberal governance of the nineteenth-century state and city depended on the "rule of freedom". As a form of rule it relied on the production of certain kinds of citizens and patterns of social life, which in turn depended on transforming both the material form of the city (its layout, architecture, infrastructure) and the ways it was inhabited and imagined by its leaders, citizens and custodians. Focusing mainly on London and Manchester, but with reference also to Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Vienna, colonial India, and even contemporary Los Angeles, Patrick Joyce creatively and originally develops Foucauldian approaches to historiography to reflect on the nature of modern liberal society. His consideration of such "artifacts" as maps and censuses, sewers and markets, public libraries and parks, and of civic governments and city planning, are intertwined with theoretical interpretations to examine both the impersonal, often invisible forms of social direction and control built into the infrastructure of modern life and the ways in which these mechanisms both shape culture and social life and engender popular resistance.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Brian Larkin1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the range of anthropological literature that seeks to theorize infrastructure by drawing on biopolitics, science and technology studies, and theories of technopolitics.
Abstract: Infrastructures are material forms that allow for the possibility of exchange over space. They are the physical networks through which goods, ideas, waste, power, people, and finance are trafficked. In this article I trace the range of anthropological literature that seeks to theorize infrastructure by drawing on biopolitics, science and technology studies, and theories of technopolitics. I also examine other dimensions of infrastructures that release different meanings and structure politics in various ways: through the aesthetic and the sensorial, desire and promise.

1,615 citations


Cites background from "The Rule of Freedom: Liberalism and..."

  • ...…Anand demonstrate how the operation of technologies, ostensibly a neutral practice, becomes the grounds around which forms of citizenship are contested (Barry 2001; Joyce 2003; Mitchell 2002, 2011; Otter 2008) and where technological systems are entangled with other religious and political domains....

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  • ...As several scholars have pointed out, liberalism is a form of government that disavows itself, seeking to organize populations and territories through technological domains that seem far removed from formal political institutions (Barry 2001; Joyce 2003; Mitchell 2002, 2011)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Nikhil Anand1
TL;DR: This article focuses on the ways in which residents in a predominantly Muslim settlement draw water despite the state's neglect, and points to the indeterminacy of water, and the ways its seepage and leakage make different kinds of politics and publics possible in the city.
Abstract: In Mumbai, most all residents are delivered their daily supply of water for a few hours every day, on a water supply schedule. Subject to a more precarious supply than the city's upper-class residents, the city's settlers have to consistently demand that their water come on “time” and with “pressure.” Taking pressure seriously as both a social and natural force, in this article I focus on the ways in which settlers mobilize the pressures of politics, pumps, and pipes to get water. I show how these practices not only allow settlers to live in the city, but also produce what I call hydraulic citizenship—a form of belonging to the city made by effective political and technical connections to the city's infrastructure. Yet, not all settlers are able to get water from the city water department. The outcomes of settlers' efforts to access water depend on a complex matrix of socionatural relations that settlers make with city engineers and their hydraulic infrastructure. I show how these arrangements describe and produce the cultural politics of water in Mumbai. By focusing on the ways in which residents in a predominantly Muslim settlement draw water despite the state's neglect, I conclude by pointing to the indeterminacy of water, and the ways in which its seepage and leakage make different kinds of politics and publics possible in the city.

479 citations


Cites background from "The Rule of Freedom: Liberalism and..."

  • ...This provides further evidence of the ways in which citizenship is tied to claims of property in the city (see Joyce 2003)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that a shift is taking place in the fabric of capitalism as a result of a change in how the business of invention is understood, using theoretical approaches that rely on the notion that capitalism increasingly tries to draw in the whole intellect.
Abstract: This paper argues that a shift is taking place in the fabric of capitalism as a result of a change in how the business of invention is understood. Using theoretical approaches that rely on the notion that capitalism increasingly tries to draw in the whole intellect, in the first part of the paper I argue that the new understanding of innovation currently shows up as three associated developments: as the mobilization of forethought, as the deepening of the lure of the commodity through the co-creation of commodities with consumers, and as the construction of different kinds of apparently more innovative space suffused with information technology. The second part of the paper then argues that these disclosures are leading to new forms of value, based on generating moments of rightness. There is a brief conclusion.

295 citations


Cites background from "The Rule of Freedom: Liberalism and..."

  • ...The second model of value may be understood as a dislocated liberalism which performs power-knowledge in novel ways based on the practices of character formation (Joyce 2003)....

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