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Journal Article

The Second Amendment and Global Gun Control

01 Jan 2003-Journal on firearms and public policy (Second Amendment Foundation)-Vol. 15, Iss: 1, pp 1-15
TL;DR: In this paper, the United Nations' recent efforts at international gun control and how those efforts conflict with the American right to keep and bear arms are discussed and discussed. But the interplay between the international law involved in global gun prohibition efforts and the domestic law of the United States is explored.
Abstract: This article explores the interplay between the international law involved in global gun prohibition efforts and the domestic law of the United States. The right to bear arms carries a unique significance in American law and culture and now faces conflict with international gun control. Left unchecked, international gun control will compromise a fundamental human right. This Article explains the United Nations' recent efforts at international gun control and how those efforts conflict with the American right to bear arms.
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TL;DR: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as mentioned in this paper is the moral backbone of more than two hundred human rights instruments that are now a part of our world and has been a source of hope and inspiration to thousands of groups and millions of oppressed individuals.
Abstract: In his 1941 State of the Union message President Franklin Roosevelt called for the protection worldwide of four essential freedoms: "the freedom of speech and expression, the freedom of worship, the freedom from want, and the freedom from fear". Roosevelt's enunciation of these freedoms was part of a movement that gathered strength in the 1940s and strived to make the protection of human rights part of the conditions for peace at the end of World War II. In 1947 Eleanor Roosevelt was elected to be the chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights that was charged to produce a separate document for this purpose.The resulting Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted in 1948, has become the moral backbone of more than two hundred human rights instruments that are now a part of our world. The document has been a source of hope and inspiration to thousands of groups and millions of oppressed individuals.Johannes Morsink offers a behind-the-scenes account of the Declaration's origins and development. He reports on the detailed discussions that took place in the United Nations, tells us which countries argued for or against each provision of the Declaration, explains why certain important amendments were rejected, and shows how common revulsion toward the Holocaust provided the consensus needed to adopt this universal code of ethics.

3,538 citations

Book
01 Jan 1972
TL;DR: In this article, international law in general: nature and origins the material sources of international law the subjects of international laws the relation between international law and state law, states in general recognition state territorial sovereignty and other lesser territorial rights of states.
Abstract: Part 1 International law in general: nature and origins the material sources of international law the subjects of international law the relation between international law and state law. Part 2 States as subjects of international law: states in general recognition state territorial sovereignty and other lesser territorial rights of states. Part 3 Rights and duties of states: jurisdiction the law of the sea and maritime highways state responsibility succession to rights and obligations the state and the individual the state and economic interests - international economic and monetary law development and the environment - Stockholm Conference of 1972 on the human environment. Part 4 International transactions: the agents of international business diplomatic envoys, consuls and other representatives the law and practice as to treaties. Part 5 Disputes and hostile relations (including war, armed conflicts and neutrality): international disputes war, armed conflicts and other hostile relations neutrality, quasi-neutrality and non-belligerency. Part 6 International institutions.

133 citations