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The Seed in Genesis 3:15 : an Exegetical and Intertextual Study

TL;DR: The meaning and referent of the "seed" and its related pronouns in Gen 3:15 have been discussed throughout the history of Jewish and Christian interpretation as mentioned in this paper, and it has been shown that there is a Messianic intention in this verse based on the narrowing phenomenon of the seed in the Hebrew text.
Abstract: The Topic This dissertation seeks to ascertain the meaning and referent of the “seed” and its related pronouns in Gen 3:15. The Purpose The meaning and referent of “seed” and its related pronouns in Gen 3:15 have been discussed throughout the history of Jewish and Christian interpretation. This dissertation analyzes Gen 3:15 exegetically, intratextually, and intertextually, tracing the meaning of this “seed” in Genesis, the rest of the Old Testament, and the New Testament. The Introduction briefly surveys the centuries of the Jewish and Christian interpretations of Gen 3:15 classifying them into related categories such as literal, naturalistic, historical, political, allegorical, figurative, eschatological and Christo logical interpretations. Chapter 1 surveys Gen 3:15 and its context. The textual analysis shows that the ancient texts significantly follow a Hebrew text similar to the MT. The literary, structural, thematic, terminological, syntactical, morphological, and semantic analyses of the context of Gen 3:15 demonstrate that this verse is the center of the message of Gen 3. The nanowing movement in the Hebrew text of Gen 3:15 reveals the Messianic import of this watershed verse. The clash between the serpent and the woman becomes the long-lasting enmity between their respective plural collective seed comprising all human beings. This narrows down into a fatal clash between Satan, the singular serpent, and the Messiah, the singular, individual representative Seed of the woman. Chapter 2 examines the intratextual use of the seed and its related pronouns of Gen 3:15 within the rest of the book of Genesis beginning from Gen 1:28. The narrowing from the plural collective seed to the singular, individual, representative Seed establishes a pattern for signifying Messianic intention in some of these seed passages, especially Gen 22:17-19 and Gen 24:60. The special Seed is already described as Messianic, royal, and priestly in Genesis. Chapter 3 shows that the Pentateuch is consistent in its understanding and portrayal of the seed of Gen 3:15. The intertextual study of the seed shows that subsequent authors of the OT and NT recognized and followed the same understanding of the seed. Chapter 4 examines the similarities and differences between Gen 3:15 and the Conclusions This dissertation concludes that there is a Messianic intention in Gen 3:15 based on the narrowing phenomenon of the seed in the Hebrew text of this verse. The Seed and the serpent have a fatal and deadly clash in which the Messiah is eternally victorious on behalf of all the righteous seed.
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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Politics of Reproductive Ritual is a book that could have been much better than it is as mentioned in this paper, which argues that male rights over the reproductive powers of women must be settled by direct bargains among the parties themselves.
Abstract: The Politics of Reproductive Ritual is a book that could have been much better than it is. The basic idea, that reproductive rituals are a form of politics used in stateless societies that lack more explicit political tactics, is excellent. By \"reproductive rituals\" the authors mean male circumcision, female menarcheal ceremonies and genital mutilation, menstrual pollution and other sex segregation practices, the couvade and maternal childbirth restrictions. Karen Paige and Jeffery Paige argue that, in the tribal and band societies with which they are concerned, the allegiance of children is the key to adults' (or more specifically, adult males') power, wealth, and status. In the absence of a police force or other independent control agencies, male rights over the reproductive powers of women must be settled by direct bargains among the parties themselves. Reproductive rituals are political tactics for gauging the future intentions of other people in one's society and for manipulating and monitoring public opinion. The tribal ritual of sex is an extension of politics by other means. The theory has a great deal of intuitive appeal, and it is certainly much more straightforward than the involuted Freudian explanations that have held the field in this area, and which the Paiges have little difficulty disproving. For example, menstruation gives obvious evidence of a woman's fertility, hence rituals which make it highly visible have a clear significance for those societies in which politics revolves almost entirely around negotiating kinship connections. One of the most striking applications of this approach is the Paiges' treatment of circumcision rituals. These rituals are especially important in pastoral societies, and the authors' case study of ancient Hebrew society gives convincing explanation for this. These wandering herdsmen had enough economic resources to build sizable political coalitions, resources with enough value to necessitate military protection. A patriarch's greatest political weapon was his capacity to have many sons, who might, by further reproduction, add still more men to the coalition. But such family-based coalitions were always in danger of splitting into warring factions, especially since the herding environment imposed no constraints (such as are found in more sedentary pursuits) on wandering off to found one's own lineage.' How was the kinship coalition to be kept together? The Paiges argue that the

697 citations

Book
01 Jan 1958
TL;DR: In this era of increased knowledge the essence of religious phenomena eludes the psychologists, sociologists, linguists, and other specialists because they do not study it as religious as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In this era of increased knowledge the essence of religious phenomena eludes the psychologists, sociologists, linguists, and other specialists because they do not study it as religious. According to Mircea Eliade, they miss the one irreducible element in religious phenomena the element of the sacred. Eliade abundantly demonstrates universal religious experience and shows how humanity's effort to live within a sacred sphere has manifested itself in myriad cultures from ancient to modern times; how certain beliefs, rituals, symbols, and myths have, with interesting variations, persisted.

663 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: This paper found no positive difference in meaning between the pairs, apart from the few cases of collectives/nomina unitatis (# 6 and perhaps # 3) and found that one of the forms occurs in a poetic or elevated style, and the other mainly in an ordinary prosaic style.
Abstract: nouns (## 1–2), parts of body (## 3–4), agricultural terms (## 5–6), words connected with clothing (## 7–8); and pairs of words with initial ma-/mi(## 9– 12; see 5.6), seven of which are from medial-waw roots (## 11–12). He finds no positive difference in meaning between the pairs, apart from the few cases of collectives/nomina unitatis (# 6 and perhaps # 3). 1. המשא / םשא guilt 2. המקנ / םקנ dominion, vengeance 3. הרבא / א רב pinion 4. הרג / רג back 5. הקלח / ח קל territory 6. הציצ / ץיצ blossom 7. הדפא / דופא ephod 8. הרוגח / רוגח loin-covering 9. הנתמ / ןתמ gift 10. תרכממ / מ רכמ ware 11. הרוגמ / רוגמ terror 12. הלוחמ / לוחמ dance In five cases he found that one of the forms occurs in a poetic or elevated style, and the other mainly in an ordinary prosaic style (## 13–17).

573 citations