scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

The Sociolinguistics of Sign Languages

05 Nov 2001-
TL;DR: The authors discuss the global approach to sign languages in sign languages and the role of sign language planning and policy in the development of sign languages, and discuss the relationship between sign language use and language planning.
Abstract: 1. Introduction Ceil Lucas 2. Multilingualism - the global approach to sign languages Bencie Woll, Rachel Sutton-Spence and Frances Elton 3. Bilingualism and language contact Jean Ann 4. Sociolinguistic variation Ceil Lucas, Robert Bayley, Clayton Valli, Mary Rose and Alyssa Wulf 5. Discourse analysis Melanie Metzger and Ben Bahan 6. Language planning and policy Timothy Reagan 7. Language attitudes Sarah Burns, Pat Matthews and Evelyn Nolan.

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1959

3,442 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zentella as discussed by the authors described growing up bilingual in New York as a "growing up Bilingual" child in a bilingual family, and used it in her book Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto Rican Children in Manhattan.
Abstract: Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto Rican Children in New York. Ana Celia Zentella. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1997.323 pp.

400 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1986-Language

392 citations

References
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1967
TL;DR: This work focuses on Ethnomethodology, which investigates the role of sex status in the lives of the Intersexed Person and some of the rules of Correct Decisions that Jurors Respect.
Abstract: 1. What is Ethnomethodology?. 2. Studies of the Routine Grounds of Everyday Activities. 3. Common Sense Knowledge of Social Structures: The Documentary Method of Interpretation in Lay and Professional Fact Finding. 4. Some Rules of Correct Decisions that Jurors Respect. 5. Passing and the Managed Achievement of Sex Status in the Intersexed Person. 6. "Good Organizational Reasons for a Bada Clinic Records". 7. Methodological Adequacy in the Quantitative Study of Selection Criteria and Selection Practices in Psychiatric Outpatient Clinics. 8. The Rational Properties of Scientific and Common Sense Activities. Appendix.

11,533 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1974-Language
TL;DR: Turn-taking is used for the ordering of moves in games, for allocating political office, for regulating traffic at intersections, for the servicing of customers at business establishments, and for talking in interviews, meetings, debates, ceremonies, conversations.
Abstract: Publisher Summary Turn taking is used for the ordering of moves in games, for allocating political office, for regulating traffic at intersections, for the servicing of customers at business establishments, and for talking in interviews, meetings, debates, ceremonies, conversations. This chapter discusses the turn-taking system for conversation. On the basis of research using audio recordings of naturally occurring conversations, the chapter highlights the organization of turn taking for conversation and extracts some of the interest that organization has. The turn-taking system for conversation can be described in terms of two components and a set of rules. These two components are turn-constructional component and turn-constructional component. Turn-allocational techniques are distributed into two groups: (1) those in which next turn is allocated by current speaker selecting a next speaker and (2) those in which next turn is allocated by self-selection. The turn-taking rule-set provides for the localization of gap and overlap possibilities at transition-relevance places and their immediate environment, cleansing the rest of a turn's space of systematic bases for their possibility.

10,944 citations


"The Sociolinguistics of Sign Langua..." refers background in this paper

  • ...They have also been described as being as small as a single turn in conversation (Sacks et al., 1974)....

    [...]

  • ...In their analysis of the organization of repair in English conversation, Sacks et al. (1974) describe the “repair-initiation opportunity space”, a period of conversation lasting three turns and beginning with a trouble source....

    [...]

  • ...In their analysis of the organization of repair in English conversation, Sacks et al. (1974) describe the “repair-initiation opportunity space”, a period of conversation lasting three turns and beginning with a trouble source. It is during this period that the speaker can self-initiate a repair, or that a repair can be initiated by another participant. They find that there is a preference for self-repair and describe in great detail what forms repairs take in their English data, and what options there may be regarding which participant completes an initiated repair. As Brown and Levinson (1987) point out, politeness and cooperation...

    [...]

01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Gumperz as discussed by the authors discusses politeness strategies in language and their implications for language studies, including sociological implications and implications for social sciences. But he does not discuss the relationship between politeness and language.
Abstract: Symbols and abbreviations Foreword John J. Gumperz Introduction to the reissue Notes 1. Introduction 2. Summarized argument 3. The argument: intuitive bases and derivative definitions 4. On the nature of the model 5. Realizations of politeness strategies in language 6. Derivative hypotheses 7. Sociological implications 8. Implications for language studies 9. Conclusions Notes References Author index Subject index.

9,542 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: Hartley as discussed by the authors discusses the psychodynamics of orality of language in the context of the oral past and present, and the evolution of the human mind from oral to written language.
Abstract: John Hartley: Before Ongism: "To become what we want to be, we have to decide what we were" Orality & Literacy: The Technologization Of The Word Introduction Part 1: The orality of language 1. The literate mind and the oral past 2. Did you say 'oral literature'? Part 2: The modern discovery of primary oral cultures 1. Early awareness of oral tradition 2. The Homeric question 3. Milman Parry's discovery 4. Consequent and related work Part 3: Some psychodynamics of orality 1. Sounded word as power and action 2. You know what you can recall: mnemonics and formulas 3. Further characteristics of orally based thought and expression 4. Additive rather than subordinative 5. Aggregative rather than analytic 6. Redundant or 'copious' 7. Conservative or traditionalist 8. Close to the human lifeworld 9. Agonistically toned 10. Empathetic and participatory rather than objectively distanced 11. Homeostatic 12. Situational rather than abstract 13. Oral memorization 14. Verbomotor lifestyle 15. The noetic role of heroic 'heavy' figures and of the bizarre 16. The interiority of sound 17. Orality, community and the sacral 18. Words are not signs Part 4: Writing restructures consciousness 1. The new world of autonomous discourse 2. Plato, writing and computers 3. Writing is a technology 4. What is 'writing' or 'script'? 5. Many scripts but only one alphabet 6. The onset of literacy 7. From memory to written records 8. Some dynamics of textuality 9. Distance, precision, grapholects and magnavocabularies 10. Interactions: rhetoric and the places 11. Interactions: learned languages 12. Tenaciousness of orality Part 5: Print, space and closure 1. Hearing-dominance yields to sight-dominance 2. Space and meaning 3. Indexes 4. Books, contents and labels 5. Meaningful surface 6. Typographic space 7. More diffuse effects 8. Print and closure: intertextuality 9. Post-typography: electronics Part 6: Oral memory, the story line and characterization 1. The primacy of the story line 2. Narrative and oral cultures 3. Oral memory and the story line 4. Closure of plot: travelogue to detective story 5. The 'round' character, writing and print Part 7: Some theorems 1. Literary history 2. New Criticism and Formalism 3. Structuralism 4. Textualists and deconstructionists 5. Speech-act and reader-response theory 6. Social sciences, philosophy, biblical studies 7. Orality, writing and being human 8. 'Media' versus human communication 9. The inward turn: consciousness and the text John Hartley: After Ongism: The Evolution of Networked Intelligence

5,688 citations


"The Sociolinguistics of Sign Langua..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Branson and Miller, 1998b); others suggest 4,000 (Fromkin and Rodman, 1998) and another source quotes 3,000 (Ong, 1982)....

    [...]

  • ...According to Ong, of the several thousand spoken languages used today, only 78 have a written literature (Ong, 1982)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1977-Language
TL;DR: In this article, a distinction is drawn between self-correction and other-correction, i.e., correction by the speaker of that which is being corrected vs. correction by some "other".
Abstract: An "organization of repair' operates in conversation, addressed to recurrent problems in speaking, hearing, and understanding. Several features of that organization are introduced to explicate the mechanism which produces a strong empirical skewing in which self-repair predominates over other-repair, and to show the operation of a preference for self-repair in the organization of repair. Several consequences of the preference for self-repair for conversational interaction are sketched.* 1. SELF- AND OTHER-CORRECTION. Among linguists and others who have at all concerned themselves with the phenomenon of'correction' (or, as we shall refer to it, 'repair'; cf. below, ?2.1), a distinction is commonly drawn between 'selfcorrection' and 'other-correction', i.e. correction by the speaker of that which is being corrected vs. correction by some 'other'.l Sociologists take an interest in such a distinction; its terms-'self' and 'other'-have long been understood as central to the study of social organization and social interaction.2 For our concerns in this paper, 'self' and 'other' are two classes of participants in interactive social

3,925 citations