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Journal ArticleDOI

The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition and Extermination in Twentieth-century Spain

22 May 2013-Journal of Genocide Research (Routledge)-Vol. 15, Iss: 2, pp 239-241
TL;DR: Preston as mentioned in this paper has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide, and he quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same.
Abstract: Paul Preston is a renowned historian, and is considered one of the world’s leading experts on 20th-century Spanish history. His book on the genocidal actions taken against Spanish civilians between 1936 and 1945 is an important resource that has changed historiography on the period. From the perceived failures of the elected government to the rise of Francisco Franco and his subsequent authoritative takeover of Spain (that lasted 41 years), his book covers these events in painstaking detail. The ensuing, bloody civil war led to the death of hundreds of thousands, and the author carefully detailed every aspect of how the murders enfolded. Repression occurred on both sides, and Preston carefully laid out the origins of extermination in Spain, from the legacy of the Africanistas, to emerging genocidal rhetoric to finally murder on a massive scale. He has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide. He quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and the right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same. The radical rightists, the army, and even citizen mobs carried out mass acts of genocide against civilians who had been categorized, dehumanized, and purposely targeted for death. Preston, who in March 2012 speaking at the Embassy of Spain in London, argued that the Francoists, like Francisco Franco and other military – and civilian – conspirators killed more Spanish than the Nazis killed Germans.(1) Preston begins the text with a prologue that defends his use of the word holocaust in the title of the book, a decision, and his intent with selecting the word, will be discussed later in this review.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the possibilities of attending to geographies on the other side of life by drawing upon resources from philosophy, sociology, history, and anthropology, and explored the possibility to attend to the world from a different perspective.
Abstract: Drawing upon resources from philosophy, sociology, history, and anthropology, this paper explores the possibilities of attending to geographies on the other side of life. After an introductory revi...

234 citations


Cites background from "The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition ..."

  • ...…in Argentina (see Domanska, 2005), or the continuing projects to recognize and map atrocities committed by Franco in Spain (Tremlett, 2006; see also Preston, 2013).12 In these contexts, the ability to mourn and attend to graves continues to be politically contested, precisely because it is to be…...

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyse conflicts over human remains by positing them as 'boundary objects' with agency, in which a number of communities are invested and show how forensic knowledge does not finalise, but interacts with social, political, legal and historical interpretations of past violence in ways that are both conflicted and unpredictable.
Abstract: Forensic anthropology makes particular professional claims - scientific, probative, humanitarian, historical, political and deterrent - which attempt to finalise interpretations of the past. However, I argue that these claims conceal a range of contests and conflicts around the social, political, legal and scientific significance of human remains. I look at the ways in which forensic work is embedded within a network of artefacts, actors and institutions that have different stakes in the interpretation of the past. I analyse conflicts over human remains by positing them as 'boundary objects' with agency, in which a number of communities are invested and show how forensic knowledge does not finalise, but interacts with social, political and historical interpretations of past violence in ways that are both conflicted and unpredictable.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The explanatory model behind Esping-Andersen's 'three-regime' typology points to the variance in political coalition building in the transition from a rural economy to a middle-class society.
Abstract: The explanatory model behind Esping-Andersen’s ‘three-regime’ typology points to the variance in ‘political coalition building in the transition from a rural economy to a middle-class society’, par...

41 citations


Cites background from "The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition ..."

  • ...Spain witnessed violent episodes before the turn of the century, experienced a dictatorship under de Rivera as of 1923 (Preston, 2006, 2012), and, once the civil war ended, was ruled by the brutal military dictatorship of Franco between 1939 and 1975....

    [...]

BookDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The first volume of the new ries, Studies in Euroculture, published by Gottingen University Press as discussed by the authors explores the field of Euroculture in its different elements: it includes topics such as cosmopolitanism, cultural memory and traumatic past(s), colonial heritage, democratization and Europeanization as well as the concept of (European) identity in various disciplinary contexts such as law and the social sciences.
Abstract: Universitatsverlag Gottingen Universitatsverlag Gottingen E Space for Transcultural Existence? is the first volume of the new ries, Studies in Euroculture, published by Gottingen University Press. The series derives its name from the Erasmus Mundus Master of Excellence Euroculture: Europe in the Wider World, a two year programme offered by a consortium of eight European universities in collaboration with four partner universities outside Europe. This master highlights regional, national and supranational dimensions of the European democratic development; mobility, migration and inter-, multiand transculturality. The impact of culture is understood as an element of political and social development within Europe. The articles published here explore the field of Euroculture in its different elements: it includes topics such as cosmopolitanism, cultural memory and traumatic past(s), colonial heritage, democratization and Europeanization as well as the concept of (European) identity in various disciplinary contexts such as law and the social sciences. In which way have Europeanization and Globalization influenced life in Europe more specifically? To what extent have people in Europe turned ‘transcultural’? The ‘trans’ is understood as indicator of an overlapping mix of cultures that does not allow for the construction of sharp differentiations. It is explored in topics such as (im)migration and integration, as well as cultural products and lifestyle. The present economic crisis and debt crisis have led, as side-result, to a public attack on the open, cosmopolitan outlook of Europe. The values of the multicultural and civil society and the idea of a people’s Europe have become debatable. This volume offers food for thought and critical reflection.

33 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018
Abstract: 2 The thesis constitutes an original contribution to the gender historiography of the Spanish Civil War (1936-9). It examines the vital and invisible role played by anti-Republican women within Madrid’s ‘fifth column’ during the conflict. While much has been written on Republican women’s war efforts, historians have underestimated women’s participation in anti-Republican resistance activities in the Republican held zones. The work explores how and why a small sector of Catholic women chose to mobilise against the legally constituted Popular Front government in support of an undemocratic military coup. This politicoreligious mobilisation was conceptualised within discourses of ‘holy Crusade.’ During the war Madrid was home to the largest, most well-organised and effective fifth column resistance in the Republican held zones. Anti-Republican women were the first to mobilise a resistance in the rearguard and they played a vital role in the construction of a subversive national Catholic imaginary in the capital which was forged in the crucible of war. Of course, this imaginary predates the Civil War.1 However, circumstances of war and 1 See for example Ch.7, “The ‘Two Spains’” in Álvarez Junco, José (2011), Spanish Identity in the Age of Nations, (Manchester: MUP), pp.246-289. The author analyses the failures of

29 citations


Cites background from "The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition ..."

  • ...They attended to the wounded soldiers and their families, established dining halls 85 For a recent account of the brutal repression in the rebel held zones see Preston (2012) The Spanish Holocaust, at pp. 131-179....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the possibilities of attending to geographies on the other side of life by drawing upon resources from philosophy, sociology, history, and anthropology, and explored the possibility to attend to the world from a different perspective.
Abstract: Drawing upon resources from philosophy, sociology, history, and anthropology, this paper explores the possibilities of attending to geographies on the other side of life. After an introductory revi...

234 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyse conflicts over human remains by positing them as 'boundary objects' with agency, in which a number of communities are invested and show how forensic knowledge does not finalise, but interacts with social, political, legal and historical interpretations of past violence in ways that are both conflicted and unpredictable.
Abstract: Forensic anthropology makes particular professional claims - scientific, probative, humanitarian, historical, political and deterrent - which attempt to finalise interpretations of the past. However, I argue that these claims conceal a range of contests and conflicts around the social, political, legal and scientific significance of human remains. I look at the ways in which forensic work is embedded within a network of artefacts, actors and institutions that have different stakes in the interpretation of the past. I analyse conflicts over human remains by positing them as 'boundary objects' with agency, in which a number of communities are invested and show how forensic knowledge does not finalise, but interacts with social, political and historical interpretations of past violence in ways that are both conflicted and unpredictable.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The explanatory model behind Esping-Andersen's 'three-regime' typology points to the variance in political coalition building in the transition from a rural economy to a middle-class society.
Abstract: The explanatory model behind Esping-Andersen’s ‘three-regime’ typology points to the variance in ‘political coalition building in the transition from a rural economy to a middle-class society’, par...

41 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018
Abstract: 2 The thesis constitutes an original contribution to the gender historiography of the Spanish Civil War (1936-9). It examines the vital and invisible role played by anti-Republican women within Madrid’s ‘fifth column’ during the conflict. While much has been written on Republican women’s war efforts, historians have underestimated women’s participation in anti-Republican resistance activities in the Republican held zones. The work explores how and why a small sector of Catholic women chose to mobilise against the legally constituted Popular Front government in support of an undemocratic military coup. This politicoreligious mobilisation was conceptualised within discourses of ‘holy Crusade.’ During the war Madrid was home to the largest, most well-organised and effective fifth column resistance in the Republican held zones. Anti-Republican women were the first to mobilise a resistance in the rearguard and they played a vital role in the construction of a subversive national Catholic imaginary in the capital which was forged in the crucible of war. Of course, this imaginary predates the Civil War.1 However, circumstances of war and 1 See for example Ch.7, “The ‘Two Spains’” in Álvarez Junco, José (2011), Spanish Identity in the Age of Nations, (Manchester: MUP), pp.246-289. The author analyses the failures of

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors use geo-located data on historical mass graves, disaggregated modern-day survey data on trust, combined with modern electoral results to show that the Spanish Civil War had a long-lasting effect on social capital, voting behavior and collective memory.
Abstract: The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) was one of the most devastating conflicts of the twentieth century, yet little is known about its long-term legacy. We show that the war had a long-lasting effect on social capital, voting behavior and collective memory. To this end we use geo-located data on historical mass graves, disaggregated modern-day survey data on trust, combined with modern electoral results. For econometric identification, we exploit deviations from the initial military plans of attack, using the historical (1931) highway network. We also employ a geographical Regression Discontinuity Design along the Aragon Front. Our results show a significant, negative and sizable relationship between political violence and generalized trust. We further decompose the trust results, finding negative effects of conflict on trust in institutions associated with the Civil War, but no effects when looking at trust on Post 1975 democratic institutions. We also find long-lasting results on voting during the Democratic Period (1977-2016), corresponding to the sided political repression implemented in the Aragon region. In terms of mechanisms — using a specialized survey on the Civil War, street names data and Francoist newsreels about the war — we find lower levels of political engagement and differential patterns of collective memory about this traumatic historical event.

29 citations