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Journal ArticleDOI

The standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: report from the Standardisation Sub-committee of the International Continence Society.

01 Mar 2002-Neurourology and Urodynamics (Neurourol Urodyn)-Vol. 21, Iss: 2, pp 167-178

TL;DR: The standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: Report from the standardistation sub-committee of the International Continence Society.

AbstractThe standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: Report from the standardistation sub-committee of the International Continence Society.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Next to existing terminology of the lower urinary tract, due to its increasing complexity, the terminology for pelvic floor dysfunction in women may be better updated by a female‐specific approach and clinically based consensus report.
Abstract: Introduction and hypothesis Next to existing terminology of the lower urinary tract, due to its increasing complexity, the terminology for pelvic floor dysfunction in women may be better updated by a female-specific approach and clinically based consensus report. Methods This report combines the input of members of the Standardization and Terminology Committees of two Inter

2,117 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The EPIC study is the largest population-based survey to assess prevalence rates of OAB, UI, and other LUTS in five countries and is the first study to evaluate these symptoms simultaneously using the 2002 ICS definitions.
Abstract: Objective Estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB), and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among men and women in five countries using the 2002 International Continence Society (ICS) definitions. Methods This population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted between April and December 2005 in Canada, Germany, Italy, Sweden, and the United Kingdom using computer-assisted telephone interviews. A random sample of men and women aged ≥ 18 yr residing in the five countries and who were representative of the general populations in these countries was selected. Using 2002 ICS definitions, the prevalence estimates of storage, voiding, and postmicturition LUTS were calculated. Data were stratified by country, age cohort, and gender. Results A total of 19,165 individuals agreed to participate; 64.3% reported at least one LUTS. Nocturia was the most prevalent LUTS (men, 48.6%; women, 54.5%). The prevalence of storage LUTS (men, 51.3%; women, 59.2%) was greater than that for voiding (men, 25.7%; women, 19.5%) and postmicturition (men, 16.9%; women, 14.2%) symptoms combined. The overall prevalence of OAB was 11.8%; rates were similar in men and women and increased with age. OAB was more prevalent than all types of UI combined (9.4%). Conclusions The EPIC study is the largest population-based survey to assess prevalence rates of OAB, UI, and other LUTS in five countries. To date, this is the first study to evaluate these symptoms simultaneously using the 2002 ICS definitions. The results indicate that these symptoms are highly prevalent in the countries surveyed.

2,051 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The NOBLE studies do not support the commonly held notion that women are considerably more likely than men to have urgency-related bladder control problems, and overactive bladder, with and without urge incontinence, has a clinically significant impact on quality-of-life, quality- of-sleep, and mental health, in both men and women.
Abstract: Context: the National Overactive BLadder Evaluation (NOBLE) Program was initiated to better understand the prevalence and burden of overactive bladder in a broad spectrum of the United States population. Objective: to estimate the prevalence of overactive bladder with and without urge incontinence in the US, assess variation in prevalence by sex and other factors, and measure individual burden. Design: US national telephone survey using a clinically validated interview and a follow-up nested study comparing overactive bladder cases to sex- and age-matched controls. Setting: noninstitutionalized US adult population. Participants: a sample of 5,204 adults ≥18 years of age and representative of the US population by sex, age, and geographical region. Main outcome measures: prevalence of overactive bladder with and without urge incontinence and risk factors for overactive bladder in the US. In the nested case-control study, SF-36, CES-D, and MOS sleep scores were used to assess impact. Results: the overall prevalence of overactive bladder was similar between men (16.0%) and women (16.9%), but sex-specific prevalence differed substantially by severity of symptoms. In women, prevalence of urge incontinence increased with age from 2.0% to 19% with a marked increase after 44 years of age, and in men, increased with age from 0.3% to 8.9% with a marked increase after 64 years of age. Across all age groups, overactive bladder without urge incontinence was more common in men than in women. Overactive bladder with and without urge incontinence was associated with clinically and significantly lower SF-36 quality-of-life scores, higher CES-D depression scores, and poorer quality of sleep than matched controls. Conclusions: the NOBLE studies do not support the commonly held notion that women are considerably more likely than men to have urgency-related bladder control problems. The overall prevalence of overactive bladder does not differ by sex; however, the severity and nature of symptom expression does differ. Sex-specific anatomic differences may increase the probability that overactive bladder is expressed as urge incontinence among women compared with men. Nonetheless, overactive bladder, with and without incontinence, has a clinically significant impact on quality-of-life, quality-of-sleep, and mental health, in both men and women.

1,863 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A consensus-based terminology report for female pelvic floor dysfunction has been produced aimed at being a significant aid to clinical practice and a stimulus for research.
Abstract: Next to existing terminology of the lower urinary tract, due to its increasing complexity, the terminology for pelvic floor dysfunction in women may be better updated by a female-specific approach and clinically based consensus report. This report combines the input of members of the Standardization and Terminology Committees of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the International Continence Society (ICS), assisted at intervals by many external referees. Appropriate core clinical categories and a subclassification were developed to give an alphanumeric coding to each definition. An extensive process of 15 rounds of internal and external review was developed to exhaustively examine each definition, with decision-making by collective opinion (consensus). A terminology report for female pelvic floor dysfunction, encompassing over 250 separate definitions, has been developed. It is clinically based with the six most common diagnoses defined. Clarity and user-friendliness have been key aims to make it interpretable by practitioners and trainees in all the different specialty groups involved in female pelvic floor dysfunction. Female-specific imaging (ultrasound, radiology, and MRI) has been a major addition while appropriate figures have been included to supplement and help clarify the text. Ongoing review is not only anticipated but will be required to keep the document updated and as widely acceptable as possible. A consensus-based terminology report for female pelvic floor dysfunction has been produced aimed at being a significant aid to clinical practice and a stimulus for research.

1,373 citations


Cites background from "The standardisation of terminology ..."

  • ...Report from the standardisation subcommittee of the International Continence Society....

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  • ...Normally, the individual is aware of increasing sensation with bladder filling up to a strong desire to void [3]....

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  • ...The 2002 Report [3] still provided the traditional core terminology and some useful modifications, many of which are repeated in this document....

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  • ...Haylen BT, Chetty N (2007) International Continence Society 2002 Terminology Report....

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  • ...(ii) Nocturia: complaint of interruption of sleep one or more times because of the need to micturate [3]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Purpose: We updated the terminology in the field of pediatric lower urinary tract function. Materials and Methods: Discussions were held of the board of the International Children’s Continence Society and an extensive reviewing process was done involving all members of the International Children’s Continence Society as well as other experts in the field. Results and Conclusions: New definitions and a standardized terminology are provided, taking into account changes in the adult sphere and new research results.

824 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A standard system of terminology recently approved by the International Continence Society, the American Urogynecologic Society, and the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons for the description of female pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic floor dysfunction is presented.
Abstract: This article presents a standard system of terminology recently approved by the International Continence Society, the American Urogynecologic Society, and the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons for the description of female pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic floor dysfunction. An objective site-specific system for describing, quantitating, and staging pelvic support in women is included. It has been developed to enhance both clinical and academic communication regarding individual patients and populations of patients. Clinicians and researchers caring for women with pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic floor dysfunction are encouraged to learn and use the system.

3,574 citations





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This report contains a recommendation for a provisional standard method for defining obstruction on the basis of pressure-flow data and more detailed analyses of Pressure-flow relationships, described below, are advisable to aid diagnosis and to quantify data for research studies.
Abstract: textThe 1988 version of the collated reports on standardisation of terminology, which appeared in Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol. 7, pp. 403–427, contains material relevant to pressure flow studies in many different sections. This report is a revision and expansion of Sections 4.2 and 4.3 and parts of Sections 6.2 and 7 of the 1988 report. It contains a recommendation for a provisional standard method for defining obstruction on the basis of pressure-flow data. 2. Evaluation of Micturition 2.1. Pressure-Flow Studies At present, the best method of analysing voiding function quantitatively is the pressure-flow study of micturition, with simultaneous recording of abdominal, intravesical and detrusor pressures and flow rate (Fig. A.1.6.1). Direct inspection of the raw pressure and flow data before, during and at the end of micturition is essential, because it allows artefacts and untrustworthy data to be recognised and eliminated. More detailed analyses of pressure-flow relationships, described below, are advisable to aid diagnosis and to quantify data for research studies. The flow pattern in a pressure-flow study should be representative of free flow studies in the same patient. It is important to eliminate artefacts and unrepresentative studies before applying more detailed analyses. Pressure-flow studies contain information about the behaviour of the urethra and the behaviour of the detrusor.

404 citations