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The Star-Spangled Screen: The American World War II Film

01 Jan 1985-
TL;DR: The Star-Spangled Screen as discussed by the authors examines the historical accuracy or lack thereof of films about the Third Reich, the Resistance, and major military campaigns, concerned primarily with the films of the war years, but also including discussions of such postwar movies as "Battleground" (1949), "Attack!" (1956), "The Bridge on the River Kwai" ( 1957), and "Patton" (1970).
Abstract: The American World War II film depicted a united America, a mythic America in which the average guy, the girl next door, the 4-F patriot, and the grieving mother were suddenly transformed into heroes and heroines, warriors and goddesses. " The Star-Spangled Screen" examines the historical accuracy -- or lack thereof -- of films about the Third Reich, the Resistance, and major military campaigns. Concerned primarily with the films of the war years, it also includes discussions of such postwar movies as "Battleground" (1949), "Attack!" (1956), "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957), and "Patton" (1970). This revised edition includes a new afterword that covers more recent films, such as "Sophie's Choice" (1982), "Biloxi Blues" (1986), and "Schindler's List" (1993). "The Star-Spangled Screen" makes a major contribution to popular culture by recreating an era that, for all its tragedy, was one of the most creative in the history of American film.
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Book
22 Sep 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of "uniformity" and "uncertainty" in the context of data mining.II.III.
Abstract: III

77 citations

01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a formal definition of the word "designation" in relation to the following topics: 1) KnowLEDGMENTS 2) DEDICATION
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................... ii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................... ivv DEDICATION ................................................................................................................... x

47 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: For example, between 1939 and 1946, the number of rapes in the United States increased approximately 45 percent as mentioned in this paper, and existing societal beliefs and the legal system of this period held rape victims responsible for their own victimization.
Abstract: Between 1939 and 1946 the number of rapes in the United States increased approximately 45 percent. This project strives to explain the cultural factors the fueled this increase. Existing societal beliefs and the legal system of this period held rape victims responsible for their own victimization. Additionally, the wartime mobilization of the 1940s liberated millions of young men from community and family moral surveillance. Some men experienced this liberation as license to coerce sex from women. Popular culture accepted and even praised sexual aggressiveness in men, especially military men, and linked women’s sexuality to their patriotism. The combination of all of these factors contributed to the sharp increase in sexual violence against women that we see for this period.

29 citations

Dissertation
09 Oct 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that "readjustification" was not intended to reproduce conformity but to provide the means for the reconversion of the "conformist" ex-serviceman into the independent, autonomous citizen necessary for the functioning of a democratic society, especially in contradistinction to the conformism associated with the totalitarian Other.
Abstract: The aftermath of World War II witnessed large-scale military demobilisation and. in its wake, a vast influx of returning servicemen. Their homecoming signalled a transition from military to civilian life which was often described as 'readjustment.' The term is usually taken to imply a process of homogenisation which engendered a condition of conformity in ex-servicemen and, by extension, in society at large. This thesis argues against this view and demonstrates that 'readjustment' wasn't intended to reproduce conformity but, on the contrary, was to provide the means for the reconversion of the 'conformist' ex-serviceman into the independent, autonomous citizen necessary for the functioning of a democratic society, especially in contradistinction to the conformism associated with the totalitarian Other. It was assumed that servicemen had become habituated to the military's authoritarian regimen of regulation and command which subsumed individuality. Hence, 'readjustment' was concerned with the 'nonconformist' individual who would become indispensable to a postwar' Americanism' which was being defensively constructed against totalitarianism and, moreover, against the 'totalitarian' implications of a conformism often seen as endemic in America as a mass society. This study recontextualises postwar film narratives (1945-48) in relation to the discourse of 'readjustment' and, by treating 'conformity' as a complex, contradictory and unreliable term, it problematises 'readjustment' and its role in the construction of postwar 'conformity.' The thesis draws methodologically on Michel Foucault's work on discourse theory, and Dana Polan's approaches to 1940s' narrative and social history. The study comprises two principal areas of research: part one analyses the sociological construction of 'readjustment,' and part two examines how 'readjustment' and its ramifications were refracted through film narrative. The film readings acknowledge the incoherence and instability implicit in the title's key terms through an approach which highlights narrative inconsistency, ambivalence and contradiction, and which works to disturb the notion of postwar social history as a stable, coherent narrative.

26 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: Grieg-Polelle as mentioned in this paper conducted a comparative study between the film industries of Nazi Germany and the United States in World War II and examined the governmental influence on the cinematic industries and how that affected the people.
Abstract: Dr. Beth Griech-Polelle, Advisor This is a comparative study between the film industries of Nazi Germany and the United States in World War II. I examine the governmental influence on the cinematic industries and how that affected the people. I also show that the Nazi government had more influence than is generally thought over the United States and the film industry in Hollywood. The émigrés that had to flee the Nazis brought new ideas to Hollywood, creating new genres of film. The use of Government documents, diaries, memoirs, films as well as secondary sources are the major sources. The government documents were obtained from the Motion Picture Artists Association Archive, and deal specifically with the Office of War Information. The OWI created rules for filmmaking in the war years and oversaw many productions, including Army training films. The diaries are those of Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, and I include an appendix of statements he made regarding films. In looking at certain émigrés and stars in both Hollywood and Germany, I use autobiographies and biographies detailing the lives of the famous in the pertinent years. Many of the secondary sources are previously written works about the creation of cinema, Hollywood history and the German cinematic industry. I use many films to illustrate the ideas that were being expressed to the public, as well as entertaining the people. I specifically use the film Casablanca to illustrate the importance of the fleeing émigrés from Europe to the United States, and how so many of these actual émigrés being cast in the film made it stronger. The results of my study include that both governments were heavily involved in the cinema in the time of war, creating guidelines that must be followed, and heavily censoring everything. The Nazis copied Hollywood films and ideas after Germanizing them, and the

16 citations