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The Taming of the Text : Explorations in Language, Literature and Culture

01 Jan 1989-The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Routledge)-Vol. 47, Iss: 2, pp 202
TL;DR: The authors explored the ways in which language constitutes textual functions, ranging from mediation to manipulation, from questioning to commanding, and from narrative to Bakhtin's theory of literary communication, and provided a view of the social functioning of texts, taking account of linguistic, literary and cultural elements.
Abstract: This study attempts to explore the ways in which language constitutes textual functions, ranging from mediation to manipulation, from questioning to commanding, and from narrative to Bakhtin's theory of literary communication The contributors provide a view of the social functioning of texts, taking account of linguistic, literary and cultural elements They bring together new perspectives on literary analysis and theory, on pragmatics and discourse analysis, as well as on text linguistics and reception theory Various types of text are examined - descriptions, travel accounts, dialogues, press columns, recipes, poetry and drama - including work by Brecht, Camus, Defoe, Frost, Harrison, Larkin, Plath and Shakespeare
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Dissertation
01 Jul 2016
TL;DR: The authors report a study of presented discourse in popular science narratives of discovery in English and conclude that private discourse prefers the forms commonly associated with non-fiction while assigning to them the functions most often observed in fiction.
Abstract: This thesis reports a study of presented discourse in popular science narratives of discovery in English. It focuses on the fictionalizing role of presented discourse. The thesis proposes minor adjustments to the existing models of presented discourse analysis, dividing discourse presentation into Public Discourse (speech/writing) and Private Discourse (thought). After exploring the forms and functions of discourse presentation in the narratives, the thesis concludes that Private Discourse prefers the forms commonly associated with non-fiction while assigning to them the functions most often observed in fiction. All the forms of discourse presentation in the narratives contain dramatizing properties, yet Public Discourse possesses the highest degree of dramatization. Private Discourse in the narratives possesses communicative properties generally assigned to speech/writing presentation exclusively. Private Discourse is more likely to communicate scientific hypotheses than reveal the inner worlds of actants. The thesis concludes with an examination of presented discourse outside the narratives of discovery. This analysis confirms the phenomena observed in the narratives and reveals a unique feature of presented discourse outside the narratives-the fictionalized reader-a fictional actant created using discourse presentation. The findings of the thesis present a strong argument in favour of fictionality in popular science.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1990
TL;DR: The authors define discourse analysis as "the study of how people understand language in context" and stylistic analysis as the study of style and meaning of meaning in spoken and written texts, which can include matters like textual coherence and cohesion, and inferencing of meaning by readers or listeners.
Abstract: The terms discourse analysis and stylistic analysis mean different thing to different people. Most narrowly defined, discourse analysis has only to do with the structure of spoken discourse. Such a definition separates discourse analysis from literany stylistics and pragmatics—the study of how people understand language in context. At the other end of the spectrum, discourse analysis can be carried out on spoken and written texts, and can include matters like textual coherence and cohesion, and the inferencing of meaning by readers or listeners. In this case, it includes pragmatics and much of stylistics within its bounds. Similarly, stylistics can apply just to literary texts or not, and be restricted to the study of style or, on the other hand, include the study of meaning. For the purposes of this review, relatively wide definitions of both areas have been assumed in order to make what follows reasonably comprehensive. The main restriction assumed is that the works discussed will be relevant to the examination of literature in some way. The section on literature instruction will include matters relevant to both native and non-native learners of English, and will also make reference to the integration of literary and language study.

6 citations


Cites background from "The Taming of the Text : Exploratio..."

  • ...Van Peer (1986) and Halasz (1987) make contributions in this area, as do Alderson and Short (1989) and Short and van Peer (1989)....

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  • ...Van Peer (1989), for example, examines ways of using literary texts to teach concepts related to textual cohesion....

    [...]

01 Mar 2005
TL;DR: This article explored the use of language when it is needed for creating and consolidating a state's power, such as in wartime, and examined how linguistic resources and devices are used to regulate, reconstruct, and, sometimes, manipulate reality.
Abstract: This paper on language . and politics explores the use of language when it is needed for creating and consolidating a state's power, such as in wartime. I examine how linguistic resources and devices are used to regulate, reconstruct, and, sometimes, manipulate reality. The operation of political language is to categorize and label events, phenomena, people, and the state's goals, and to formulate them in a way desirable to regulate and control the ideas and behavior of people.

5 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The authors examined the way in which six characters are introduced in Italian novels by Gadda, Manzoni, Moravia, Svevo, Tarchetti and Vassalli.
Abstract: When a character is introduced in a narrative text, his/her aspect and personality are constructed by the reader on the basis both of information found in the text and of inferences actively produced by the readers. The first perception of a character is likely to change in the course of reading, as the reader encounters new information and activates relevant inferences: this changes in the state of the mind are components of reading pleasure. The type of the information given by the narrator depends on his/her priorities. Therefore, the reader receives information on the character and, at the same time, on the narrator's priorities. In the course of his/her act of reading, the reader activates, in his memory, material to be used in his concretization. In this way, s/he introduces new information; what is not explicitly described may be concretized differently by different readers. At the same time, the act of reading is very selective, removing information that is considered irrelevant. If the reader is then asked about information which has not been maintained in memory, s/he may be unable to recover it in full and may be forced to draw inferences that lead to results that are different from the text's surface. In this paper we examine the way in which six characters are introduced in Italian novels by Gadda, Manzoni, Moravia, Svevo, Tarchetti and Vassalli. Participants were asked to read passages from the texts where the characters were presented for the first time and then summarize the passages and answer some questions. In our examination of the answers, every time we find information that was not given in the texts, we have evidence of material coming from the readers' inferences and world knowledge. This study shows how characters can be concretized differently by different readers, particularly in relation to gender and education.

4 citations