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BookDOI

The Taming of the Text : Explorations in Language, Literature and Culture

01 Jan 1989-The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Routledge)-Vol. 47, Iss: 2, pp 202
TL;DR: The authors explored the ways in which language constitutes textual functions, ranging from mediation to manipulation, from questioning to commanding, and from narrative to Bakhtin's theory of literary communication, and provided a view of the social functioning of texts, taking account of linguistic, literary and cultural elements.
Abstract: This study attempts to explore the ways in which language constitutes textual functions, ranging from mediation to manipulation, from questioning to commanding, and from narrative to Bakhtin's theory of literary communication The contributors provide a view of the social functioning of texts, taking account of linguistic, literary and cultural elements They bring together new perspectives on literary analysis and theory, on pragmatics and discourse analysis, as well as on text linguistics and reception theory Various types of text are examined - descriptions, travel accounts, dialogues, press columns, recipes, poetry and drama - including work by Brecht, Camus, Defoe, Frost, Harrison, Larkin, Plath and Shakespeare
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1993-Shofar
TL;DR: This paper found a relatively high degree of mimesis in popular newspapers, as opposed to quality papers, and a degree of poetical presentation in popular press headlines, especially in the popular press, direct quotes are rather common.
Abstract: Techniques of speech presentation in narrative fiction have been widely described by scholars of both literature and linguistics. In the press, like in fiction, strategies of presentation may be ordered along a continuum reflecting different degrees of directness in reporting the utterances. In the press, speech presentation is a result of a tension between the need to report the statements in standard "journalese" and the wish to communicate a sense of the original utterance. In newspaper headlines, especially in the popular press, direct quotes are rather common. In this way sppech presentation reflects a "rhetoric of trust" and should be viewed as part of creating a "showing" effect and dramatization. In our study we found a relatively high degree of mimesis in popular newspapers, as opposed to quality papers. Another difference lies in the degree of poetical presentation , which is widespread in popular press headlines.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the first introduction of four female characters in Italian novels and found that readers tended to concretize traits that were not explicitly stated in the text, with high values of the Gini index, showing different concretizations in different readers.
Abstract: When we read the description of a character, we receive explicit information and construct a semantic representation of his/her aspect and personality. This constructive process also involves inferential processes based on the elaboration of explicit information. In this article we examined the first introduction of four female characters in Italian novels. When readers reported information that was not given in the texts, we had evidence of their constructive processes based on their inferences and world knowledge. In our study readers tended to concretize traits that were not explicitly stated in the text, with high values of the Gini index, showing different concretizations in different readers. This tendency was quite pervasive among readers, regardless of gender, academic education and interest in the text read; such constructive process seems to be intrinsic to the act of reading itself.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Anna Jameson's "A Revelation of Childhood" she revises her childhood to accord with the current ideology of the day, but also to construct herself as a professional writer in competition with Ruskin and Carlyle.
Abstract: In Anna Jameson's "A Revelation of Childhood" she revises her childhood to accord with the current ideology of the day, but also to construct herself as a professional writer in competition with Ruskin and Carlyle. She uses two conventions of biography and autobiography to achieve this: hagiography and the concept of piety.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined a five-hundred-year old Hispanic ballad, La doncella guerrera, to illustrate how a medievalism theoretically engaged with the present and with an interdisciplinary perspective might lead to a very different understanding of the past.
Abstract: Changing definitions of gender boundaries are the subject of much theoretical inquiry today, with gender seen as a performative construct, where sexual differences are never simply a function of material differences but are always both marked and formed by discursive practices. The gender ambiguity of the transgendered body can be seen as a contradictory site of postmodernity, both as a symbol for postmodern flexibility and as a legible form of embodied subjectivity (Halberstam 2005: l5-18). Mainstream scholarship of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern, however, has generally remained unaffected by such theoretical questions. This in spite of the groundbreaking “Gay and Lesbian Issue” of the Medieval Feminist Newsletter as early as 1992 (Matter), followed by a number of other publications in the last decade, such as the collection of articles in Gender Transgressions (Taylor 1998), Queer Iberia (Blackmore and Hutcheson 1999), Queering the Middle Ages (Burger and Kruger 2001), and Same Sex Love and Desire among Women in the Middle Ages (Sautman and Sheingorn 2001), as well as Goldberg 1994, Fradenburg and Freccero 1996, Fuchs 1997, Delgado and Saint Saens 2000, Dangler 2001, Pugh 2004, the first section of articles in Cestaro 2004, and Freccero 2006. My aim here in examining a five-hundred-year old Hispanic ballad, La doncella guerrera, is to illustrate how a medievalism theoretically engaged with the present and with an interdisciplinary perspective might lead to a very different understanding of the past. In my estimation, such a framework for the doncella guerrera can broaden considerably the horizon in which the ballad can be understood, while at the same time such a richer reading can contribute another chapter to a queering of the Middle Ages. E. Ann Matter (3) has spoken of the need to rewrite compulsory patriarchal discourses of desire and fill in the “blank spaces” where queer desires might have been, for which Gregory Hutcheson cogently offers a new way to read: “we need to approach indirectly perhaps, to cross our eyes, and to read just beyond the text in efforts to bring into focus that which appears to be absent,” (265) which, as he adds, is not revisionism, but “a history beyond words.”

3 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The authors analyzed short stories by Uruguayan author Eduardo Galeano, and found that narrative empathy is a highly flexible and contextdependent phenomenon given the complex interplay between textual and readerly factors, and developed a typology of potential linguistic evidence of empathetic responses.
Abstract: Narrative empathy, broadly understood as the sharing of characters’ perspective and emotional experiences, is thought to be often involved in readers’ engagement with characters. A number of claims have been made in the literature about the potential effects of particular narrative techniques on readerly experiences of empathy. However, most of these discussions are based on narratological hypotheses, and empirical work in the area has been rather thin. This study seeks to understand the role of textual, but also readerly, factors in readers’ empathetic (or otherwise) engagement with characters. I take a qualitative linguistic approach that combines stylistic-narratological textual analysis and empirical reader-response research. I analyse some short stories by Uruguayan author Eduardo Galeano, and focus on narrative techniques which have been regarded as being somehow involved in either empathetic or non-empathetic reader responses ― point of view, speech and thought presentation, emotion presentation, and characterisation techniques. I also consider readerly factors such as contextual appraisal (including moral evaluation) and the reader-character relationship. The empathy potential of these textual and non-textual phenomena is then considered in the light of what readers report. I conducted two focus group discussions with readers who shared their experiences of the characters after reading three stories. Through thematic analysis (using Atlas.ti), I relate readers’ self-reported involvement with characters to insights from textual analysis and scholarly claims. While my findings support some of the assumptions in the literature, they also problematise some claims about the direct effects of textual cues. I argue for a nuanced approach that accommodates the interaction between textual and readerly phenomena, and conclude that narrative empathy is a highly flexible and context-dependent phenomenon given the complex interplay between textual and readerly factors. The main contributions of the study are to do with (i) the value of the focus on language (a stylistically-informed approach to the stimulus texts and a linguistically-aware approach to readers’ responses), (ii) the gathering of empirical data on readers’ responses through focus groups, and (iii) the in-depth qualitative analysis of these responses, whereby I map out the complex interplay between textual and readerly factors, and develop a typology of potential linguistic evidence of empathetic responses.

2 citations