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The Trauma of (Post)Memory: Women’s Memories in Holocaust Cinema

01 Jan 2020-pp 87-108
TL;DR: The authors argue that contemporary counter-narratives demonstrate that films are much more than (re)presentations of history: they can function as important interventions in their own right, which challenge and re-interrogate history's gender biases.
Abstract: Lewis signals a representational shift in twenty-first-century Holocaust cinema that breaks with previous, stereotyped, imagery of women and assigns them a central, privileged, authorial position from which to tell their stories. The chapter discusses some of the most relevant examples of this cycle of films, namely, Nina’s Journey (Lena Einhorn, 2005) and Remembrance (Anna Justice, 2011) and The Birch-Tree Meadow (Marceline Loridan-Ivens, 2003), among others. In particular, it explains how recent films engage with concepts of trauma and vicarious witnessing, while recovering women’s voices and memories in their diversity and uniqueness. As the chapter contends, these contemporary counter-narratives demonstrate that films are much more than (re)presentations of history: they can function as important interventions in their own right, which challenge and re-interrogate history’s gender biases.
References
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Book
26 Jun 2012
TL;DR: The Generation of Postmemory as mentioned in this paper is a collection of post-Holocaust memories and its connections to the present generation of postmemory, including the following: 1. What's Wrong With This Picture? with Leo Spitzer2. Marked by Memory3. Affiliation4. Surviving Images5. Projected Memory7. Connective Histories8. Objects of Return9. Testimonial Objects10.
Abstract: IntroductionI. Familial Postmemories and Beyond1. The Generation of Postmemory2. What's Wrong With This Picture? with Leo Spitzer3. Marked by MemoryII. Affiliation4. Surviving Images5. Nazi Photographs in Post-Holocaust Art6. Projected Memory7. Testimonial Objects with Leo SpitzerIII. Connective Histories8. Objects of Return9. Postmemory's Archival TurnNotesBibliographyAcknowledgmentsIndex

548 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this article, the female authorial voice is disembodied by Irigaray, Experimental Feminist Cinema, and Femininity, and the female subjectivity and the negative Oedipus complex.
Abstract: Acknowledgements Preface [1] Lost Objects and Mistaken Subjects: A Prologue [2] Body Talk [3] The Fantasy of the Maternal Voice: Paranoia and Compensation [4] The Fantasy of the Maternal Voice: Female Subjectivity and the Negative Oedipus Complex [5] Disembodying the Female Voice: Irigaray, Experimental Feminist Cinema, and Femininity [6] The Female Authorial Voice Notes Index

438 citations