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Journal ArticleDOI

The Vernacular Qur'an. Translation and the Rise of Persian Exegesis

02 Sep 2014-Middle Eastern Literatures (Routledge)-Vol. 17, Iss: 3, pp 312-315
About: This article is published in Middle Eastern Literatures.The article was published on 2014-09-02. It has received 20 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Vernacular & Exegesis.
Citations
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Book
28 Apr 2020
TL;DR: Translating Wisdom as mentioned in this paper reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations and illustrates how early modern Muslim and Hindu scholars drew upon their respective religious, philosophical, and literary traditions to forge a common vocabulary through which to understand one another.
Abstract: A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. During the height of Muslim power in Mughal South Asia, Hindu and Muslim scholars worked collaboratively to translate a large body of Hindu Sanskrit texts into the Persian language. Translating Wisdom reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations. Using as a case study the 1597 Persian rendition of the Yoga-Vasistha—an influential Sanskrit philosophical tale whose popularity stretched across the subcontinent—Shankar Nair illustrates how these early modern Muslim and Hindu scholars drew upon their respective religious, philosophical, and literary traditions to forge a common vocabulary through which to understand one another. These scholars thus achieved, Nair argues, a nuanced cultural exchange and interreligious and cross-philosophical dialogue significant not only to South Asia’s past but also its present.

51 citations

01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website as discussed by the authors, in case of legitimate complaints the material will be removed.
Abstract: Disclaimer/Complaints regulations If you believe that digital publication of certain material infringes any of your rights or (privacy) interests, please let the Library know, stating your reasons. In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website. Please Ask the Library: https://uba.uva.nl/en/contact, or a letter to: Library of the University of Amsterdam, Secretariat, Singel 425, 1012 WP Amsterdam, The Netherlands. You will be contacted as soon as possible.

38 citations

MonographDOI
17 Apr 2018
TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the Qur'an's inimitability across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric and argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory (c ilm al-balgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Arabic rhetoric.
Abstract: Building on the multivalent meanings of the Arabo- Persian tarjama ('to interpret', 'to translate', 'to narrate in writing'), this essay examines the doctrine of Qur'ānic inimitability (i c jāz) across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric. Treating the relation between Arabic and Persian as a case study for a theory of transla- tion specific to Islamic literary culture, it argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory ( c ilm al-balāgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Islamic rhetoric. While examining the implications of Qur'ānic hermeneutics for translation theory, it considers how the inimitability concept impacts on translatability. c Abd al-Qāhir al-Jurjānī's reflections on nazm (structure) enrich and refine Walter Benjamin's argument for translatability as a condition of literary language. Viewing Islamic literary aesthetics from the perspective of Benjaminian thinking about language can infuse contemporary translation theory with a richer sense of the translatability of literary texts.

20 citations

References
More filters
Book
28 Apr 2020
TL;DR: Translating Wisdom as mentioned in this paper reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations and illustrates how early modern Muslim and Hindu scholars drew upon their respective religious, philosophical, and literary traditions to forge a common vocabulary through which to understand one another.
Abstract: A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. During the height of Muslim power in Mughal South Asia, Hindu and Muslim scholars worked collaboratively to translate a large body of Hindu Sanskrit texts into the Persian language. Translating Wisdom reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations. Using as a case study the 1597 Persian rendition of the Yoga-Vasistha—an influential Sanskrit philosophical tale whose popularity stretched across the subcontinent—Shankar Nair illustrates how these early modern Muslim and Hindu scholars drew upon their respective religious, philosophical, and literary traditions to forge a common vocabulary through which to understand one another. These scholars thus achieved, Nair argues, a nuanced cultural exchange and interreligious and cross-philosophical dialogue significant not only to South Asia’s past but also its present.

51 citations

01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website as discussed by the authors, in case of legitimate complaints the material will be removed.
Abstract: Disclaimer/Complaints regulations If you believe that digital publication of certain material infringes any of your rights or (privacy) interests, please let the Library know, stating your reasons. In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website. Please Ask the Library: https://uba.uva.nl/en/contact, or a letter to: Library of the University of Amsterdam, Secretariat, Singel 425, 1012 WP Amsterdam, The Netherlands. You will be contacted as soon as possible.

38 citations

MonographDOI
17 Apr 2018
TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the Qur'an's inimitability across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric and argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory (c ilm al-balgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Arabic rhetoric.
Abstract: Building on the multivalent meanings of the Arabo- Persian tarjama ('to interpret', 'to translate', 'to narrate in writing'), this essay examines the doctrine of Qur'ānic inimitability (i c jāz) across Arabic and Persian literary cultures as a way of exploring the contemporary relevance of Islamic rhetoric. Treating the relation between Arabic and Persian as a case study for a theory of transla- tion specific to Islamic literary culture, it argues that the translation of Arabic rhetorical theory ( c ilm al-balāgha) into Persian marks a turning point in the history of Islamic rhetoric. While examining the implications of Qur'ānic hermeneutics for translation theory, it considers how the inimitability concept impacts on translatability. c Abd al-Qāhir al-Jurjānī's reflections on nazm (structure) enrich and refine Walter Benjamin's argument for translatability as a condition of literary language. Viewing Islamic literary aesthetics from the perspective of Benjaminian thinking about language can infuse contemporary translation theory with a richer sense of the translatability of literary texts.

20 citations