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Journal ArticleDOI

The Zoroastrian Provenance of Some Islamic Eschatological Doctrines

01 Mar 2020-Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses (SAGE PublicationsSage UK: London, England)-Vol. 49, Iss: 1, pp 86-108
TL;DR: Zoroastrianism, as the major Iranian religion before the fall of the Sasanian Empire in the seventh century, exercised a deep influence on other religious traditions of the region around it.
Abstract: Zoroastrianism, as the major Iranian religion before the fall of the Sasanian Empire in the seventh century, exercised a deep influence on other religious traditions of the region around it. In par...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive glossary of the history of Islam in terms of the quest for happiness and the theory of the power-state in the Caliphate.
Abstract: Part I. Constitutional Law and Muslim History: 1. The quest for happiness 2. The Caliphate: theory and function 3. Government 4. The theory of the power-state Part II. The Platonic Legacy: 5. Political philosophy in Islam 6. Al Farabi: the foundation 7. Ibn Sina: the synthesis 8. Ibn Bajja: individualist deviation 9. Ibn Rushd: the consummation 10. Al-Dawwani: application and integration Appendix Notes Glossary Index.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a timely and modest work that deserves to be widely read, not just by those in Islamic studies and theology, but also by those interested in current politics, is presented.
Abstract: This is a timely and modest work that deserves to be widely read, not just by those in Islamic studies and theology but also by those interested in current politics. The basic assumption that many ...

8 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: The authors provided a thorough and accessible guide to belief about the afterlife in the Sunni Muslim tradition, drawing on the Qur'an, traditions, creeds, and theological commentaries, as well as interviews with Muslim clerics.
Abstract: This book provides a thorough and accessible guide to belief about the afterlife in the Sunni Muslim tradition. Drawing on the Qur'an, traditions, creeds, and theological commentaries, as well as interviews with Muslim clerics, the authors offer an overview of the Islamic eschatological narrative, describing the understanding of events beginning with the death of the individual and ending with habitation in the final abodes of recompense.

158 citations


"The Zoroastrian Provenance of Some ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…afterlife (The Precious Pearl, al-Ghazali, 1979: 80; al-Ghazali, 2006: 195–196; for the references to tafsı̄r, Tabari and Razi, see: Brinner, 2005b: 47; Smith and Haddad, 2002: 90).25 Some Western scholars such as Bell and Watt (1970: 161), Andrae (1926: 77) and Lange (2016: 60), have found the…...

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  • ...…compiler of DaqāWiq al-akhbār provide a similar description of the s.irāt., though occasionally with the additional detail that the s.irāt. becomes “darker than night” for the damned (al-Ghazali, 2006: 209; DaqāWiq al-akhbār, (Pseudo) al-Qadi, 1979: 101; see also Smith and Haddad, 2002: 79)....

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  • ...Certain accounts in both Zoroastrian and Islamic texts, however, hold that Zarathustra and Muhammad lead the saved members of the Zoroastrian and the Muslim communities, respectively, to pass over the bridge (Yasna 46:10; Smith and Haddad, 2002: 79, 215)....

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Book
01 Jan 1981

126 citations


"The Zoroastrian Provenance of Some ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...For example, the ShiVi treatment of unbelievers as impure10 and the exercise of taqiyya (Shaked, 1992: 150) as well as the ShiVi doctrine of the imamate and the notion of the immunity of the imams from sin (maVsumiyat) have parallels in Zoroastrian writings (Lambton, 1981: 280)....

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Apr 1983
TL;DR: In the 6th century, the Parthians and then the Sasanians made Ctesiphon, on the eastern bank of the Tigris in central Mesopotamia, their capital and the centre from which Iranian power radiated over Aramaic, and then increasingly Arab, Iraq as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In the Seleucid period, Mesopotamia served as a base for the Seleucid kings' attempts to extend their political and commercial power into the Persian Gulf region and along the eastern coastlands of Arabia. The Parthians and then the Sasanians made Ctesiphon, on the eastern bank of the Tigris in central Mesopotamia, their capital and the centre from which Iranian power radiated over Aramaic, and then increasingly Arab, Iraq. The 6th century was a propitious time for Persian intervention in South Arabia. In the sphere of architecture, Persian influence on the buildings of the Lakhmids, such as the palace of Khawarnaq, must have been decisive, and Persian models must have dominated the architecture of early Islamic Iraq. Persian artistic influences also penetrated across the Syrian desert to the structures of the Umayyad caliphs on the fringes of modern Syria and Jordan, where there was a symbiosis with the local hellenistic and Byzantine artistic and architectural traditions.

116 citations

Book
01 Jan 1958
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a comprehensive glossary of the history of Islam in terms of the quest for happiness and the theory of the power-state in the Caliphate.
Abstract: Part I. Constitutional Law and Muslim History: 1. The quest for happiness 2. The Caliphate: theory and function 3. Government 4. The theory of the power-state Part II. The Platonic Legacy: 5. Political philosophy in Islam 6. Al Farabi: the foundation 7. Ibn Sina: the synthesis 8. Ibn Bajja: individualist deviation 9. Ibn Rushd: the consummation 10. Al-Dawwani: application and integration Appendix Notes Glossary Index.

79 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, Segal examines the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies' realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time.
Abstract: Publisher's description: A magisterial work of social history, Life After Death illuminates the many different ways ancient civilizations grappled with the question of what exactly happens to us after we die. In a masterful exploration of how Western civilizations have defined the afterlife, Alan F. Segal weaves together biblical and literary scholarship, sociology, history, and philosophy. A renowned scholar, Segal examines the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies' realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time. He maintains that the afterlife is the mirror in which a society arranges its concept of the self. The composition process for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam begins in grief and ends in the victory of the self over death

63 citations


"The Zoroastrian Provenance of Some ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...From a linguistic point of view, some scholars suggest that the term barzakh itself is of Persian origin (Jeffery, 1938: 77; Widengren, 1955: 179–185; Segal, 2004: 650; Shaked, 2012)....

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