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Journal ArticleDOI

Thermal stresses and shakedown in wheel/rail contact

01 Mar 2003-Archive of Applied Mechanics (Springer-Verlag)-Vol. 72, Iss: 10, pp 715-729
TL;DR: In this paper, an approximate analytical solution for a line contact model is presented for a wheel and rail, and the increased bulk temperature of the wheel after a long period of constant operating conditions is also taken into account.
Abstract: Sliding friction between railway wheels and rails results in considerable contact temperatures and gives rise to severe thermal stresses at the surfaces of the wheels and rails. An approximate analytical solution is presented for a line contact model. The increased bulk temperature of the wheel after a long period of constant operating conditions is also taken into account. The thermal stresses have to be superimposed on the mechanical contact stresses. They reduce the elastic limit of the wheel and rail, and yielding begins at lower mechanical loads. When residual stresses build up during the initial cycles of plastic deformation, the structure can carry higher loads with a purely elastic response in subsequent load cycles. This phenomenon is referred to as shakedown. Due to the distribution of temperature, the rail surface is generally subjected to higher stresses than the wheel surface. This can cause structural changes in the rail material and hence rail damage.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
15 Jan 2013-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, the running band is composed of longitudinal contact strips with various surface and subsurface morphologies, which is essential for the onset of rail squats, and this new information makes it possible to account for the entire damage mechanism of a squat defect from initiation to propagation.

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the formation of white etching layer (WEL) by martensitic transformation in R260Mn grade pearlitic rail steel was simulated by fast heating and quenching experiments.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
18 May 2011-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, a finite element method (FEM) was used to study thermal-elastic-plastic deformation and residual stress after wheel sliding on a rail, where the consideration of sliding contact between the wheel and the rail was restricted to a two dimensional contact problem.

49 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Oct 2008-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, the effects of friction coefficient and slip/roll ratio on the wear rate and rolling contact fatigue are investigated, and frictional heating effects have been found to increase the rate of damage accumulation by ratcheting, leading to increased wear and tendency for rolling contact fatigues.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the longitudinal vibration phenomenon of the wheelset when stick-slip occurs is put forward and its formation mechanism is made clear innovatively, in order to study the dynamic behaviours of locomotives under saturated adhesion.
Abstract: In order to study the dynamic behaviours of locomotives under saturated adhesion, the stability and characteristics of stick–slip vibration are analysed using the concepts of mean and dynamic slip rates. The longitudinal vibration phenomenon of the wheelset when stick–slip occurs is put forward and its formation mechanism is made clear innovatively. The stick–slip vibration is a dynamic process between the stick and the slip states. The decreasing of mean and dynamic slip rates is conducive to its stability, which depends on the W/R adhesion damping. The torsion vibration of the driving system and the longitudinal vibration of the wheelset are coupled through the longitudinal tangential force when the wheelset alternates between the stick and the slip states. The longitudinal oscillation frequencies of the wheelset are integral multiples of the natural frequency of torsion vibration of the driving system. A train dynamic model integrated with an electromechanical and a control system is established to sim...

45 citations


Cites background from "Thermal stresses and shakedown in w..."

  • ...This is because of the effects of the wheel–rail friction heat and the rail surface roughness [11]....

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References
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Book
31 Dec 1959
TL;DR: In this paper, a classic account describes the known exact solutions of problems of heat flow, with detailed discussion of all the most important boundary value problems, including boundary value maximization.
Abstract: This classic account describes the known exact solutions of problems of heat flow, with detailed discussion of all the most important boundary value problems.

21,807 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1963
TL;DR: When two metal cylinders roll together under a contact pressure sufficient to cause yielding, a surprising mode of plastic deformation occurs as mentioned in this paper, where the surface of each cylinder is progressively displace, and the deformation can be accelerated by the contact pressure.
Abstract: When two metal cylinders roll together under a contact pressure sufficient to cause yielding, a surprising mode of plastic deformation occurs. The surface of each cylinder is progressively displace...

296 citations


"Thermal stresses and shakedown in w..." refers background or result in this paper

  • ...If the shakedown limit is exceeded, repeated plastic deformation will take place within every load cycle, [ 5 ]....

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  • ...His results were compared with a full elastic‐plastic analysis of a plane strain model, [7, 8]. The finite element calculations validated the basic assumptions made in [ 5 ]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1995-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, the Laplace transforms and the method of Green's functions were used to analyze the contact temperatures and temperature fields of components in relative sliding motion, and it was shown that each kind of fluctuation causes a rise of the maximum contact temperature.

135 citations


"Thermal stresses and shakedown in w..." refers background in this paper

  • ...that combines the material properties k (thermal conductivity), . (density) and c (specific heat capacity), [18, 19 ]....

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  • ...If L > 10, heat conduction occurs only perpendicular to the contact plane, i.e. in the z-direction, [ 19 ]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2002-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, the maximum surface temperature during rolling contact of railway wheels with sliding friction can be estimated using Blok's flash temperature formula, and an efficient approach is proposed for Hertzian contact.

128 citations


"Thermal stresses and shakedown in w..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...f2ðnÞ ; ð18Þ for the rail, [ 20 , 22]. 4...

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  • ...Eq. (16) are non-dimensional functions of n that do not depend on physical parameters, [ 20 ]....

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  • ...For real wheels, the steady-state temperature is lower due to convection over the whole surface of the wheel, [ 20 ]....

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  • ...Compared with the exact solution, [ 20 ], the error is always less than 5% for typical operating conditions in the wheel/rail contact....

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  • ...The approach can be extended to the consideration of three-dimensional contact problems (elliptical area of contact) without any restriction, [ 20 ]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ponter and Engelhardt as discussed by the authors described a generalisation of the non-linear programming method described by Ponter and Carter (1997) for the evaluation of optimal upper bounds on the limit load of a body composed of a rigid/perfectly plastic material.
Abstract: The paper describes a generalisation of the programming method described by Ponter and Carter (1997) for the evaluation of optimal upper bounds on the limit load of a body composed of a rigid/perfectly plastic material. The method is based upon similar principles to the `Elastic Compensation' method which has been used for design calculations for some years but re-interpreted as a non-linear programming method. A sufficient condition for convergence is derived which relates properties of the yield surface to those of the linear solutions solved at each iteration. The method is demonstrated through an application to a Drucker–Prager yield condition in terms of the Von Mises effective stress and the hydrostatic pressure. Implementation is shown to be possible using the user routines in a commercial finite element code, ABAQUS. The examples chosen indicate that stable convergent solutions may be obtained. There are, however, limits to the application of the method if isotropic linear solutions are used for an isotropic yield surface. In an accompanying paper (Ponter and Engelhardt, 2000) the method is extended to shakedown and related problems.

127 citations


"Thermal stresses and shakedown in w..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Some recent results of the shakedown analysis including thermal stresses have been given in [ 16 , 17]....

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