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Journal ArticleDOI

This Is Not a Paper

01 Nov 1995-Educational Researcher (Sage PublicationsSage CA: Thousand Oaks, CA)-Vol. 24, Iss: 8, pp 12-18
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore some of the prospects for electronic publishing in educational research and argue that electronic and paper publishing can and should coexist, each serving distinct purposes suited to their respective media.
Abstract: This article explores some of the prospects for electronic publishing in educational research.1Some scholars have predicted that paper journals and other periodicals will disappear within a decade. Others insist that electronic and paper publishing can and should coexist, each serving distinct purposes suited to their respective media. In assessing this debate, we argue, educational researchers and others concerned with publishing should weigh the special relevance of electronic publishing to educational scholarship and practice.
Citations
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: In this article, Rheingold's account of the growth of electronic communication in the Bay Area is framed in terms such as grassroots groupminds and new electronic villages, terms that call forth the potential of new technologies to support a renewal of community.
Abstract: Diverse voices have outlined the advantages or disadvantages of technology as they have emerged within classrooms, businesses, communities, and families. Enthusiasts vaunt technological changes, which they contend can effect a more equitable distribution of power. They invoke issues such as empowerment, equality, access, speed, efficiency, liberation, and the development of a global community in support of a pro-technology agenda. As an example, Rheingold's (1993) account of the growth of electronic communication in the Bay Area is framed in terms such as grassroots groupminds and new electronic villages, terms that call forth the potential of new technologies to support a renewal of community. Going further, some proponents promote a form of technological determinism in which new tools or media alone are seen as bringing about a better world.

156 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results reveal significant variation in how education scholars participate on Twitter, and suggest that by focusing on the use of social media for scholarship researchers have only examined a fragment of scholars' online activities, possibly ignoring other areas of online presence.
Abstract: There has been a lack of large-scale research examining education scholars' (professors' and doctoral students') social media participation. We address this weakness in the literature by using data mining methods to capture a large data set of scholars' participation on Twitter (232 students, 237 professors, 74,814 unique hashtags, and 645,579 tweets). We report how education scholars use Twitter, which hashtags they contribute to, and what factors predict Twitter follower counts. We also examine differences between professors and graduate students. Results (a) reveal significant variation in how education scholars participate on Twitter, (b) question purported egalitarian structures of social media use for scholarship, and (c) suggest that by focusing on the use of social media for scholarship researchers have only examined a fragment of scholars' online activities, possibly ignoring other areas of online presence. Implications of this study lead us to consider (a) the meaningfulness of alternative metrics for determining scholarly impact, (b) the impact that power structures have upon role-based differences in use (e.g. professor vs. student), and (c) the richness of scholarly identity as a construct that extends beyond formal research agendas.

151 citations


Cites background from "This Is Not a Paper"

  • ...…researchers have claimed that digital practices in general, and social media activities in particular, have the potential to transform the ways in which education scholarship is conducted and disseminated (Burbules & Bruce, 1995; Fetterman, 1998; Greenhow, Robelia, & Hughes, 2009; Yettick, 2015)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The word "literature is dead" was coined by Bruce as discussed by the authors to refer to the notion that the book is dead in a century likely to be defined by a new technological environment.
Abstract: The word seems unavoidable now indiscussions of literacy theory and practice. Parentsask the teacher or school principal what the school isdoing about computer literacy and networking. Li-brarians are alternately invigorated or distressedthinking about what new information technologiesmean for their work. Teachers wonder about whetherthese technologies will improve children’s literacyskills or take them forever away from traditionalreading and writing. Theorists debate whether thebook is dead. Nearly everyone struggles just to stayminimally aware of new technological develop-ments and their social implications. The question ofwhat form literacies will take in a century likely tobe defined by a new technological environment(Bruce, ; Burbules

87 citations


Cites background from "This Is Not a Paper"

  • ...The question of what form literacies will take in a century likely to be deWned by a new technological environment (Bruce, 1995; Burbules & Bruce, 1995; Reinking, 1995; Reinking, McKenna, & KieVer, in press) has become a present issue for nearly everyone involved with literacy today....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explores how academic researchers disaggregate and reaggregate scientific journal articles in both print and digital environments to discuss the nature of metadata, the role of context in constraining component use, the complex assemblage of information system use and implications for digital library system design and user education.
Abstract: This paper explores how academic researchers disaggregate and reaggregate scientific journal articles in both print and digital environments. Journal article disaggregation refers to the ability to access and manipulate individual components of a document, such as its figures, conclusions or references. In reaggregation, article components are compiled and integrated into a new written work. Data gathered in the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative (DLI) project at the University of Illinois are analyzed to describe how components are mobilized in the work of researchers as they identify, retrieve, read and use material in articles of interest. Results lead to a discussion of the nature of metadata, the role of context in constraining component use, the complex assemblage of information system use and implications for digital library system design and user education.

87 citations

References
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jun 1974
TL;DR: The enormous problem of the volume of background common sense knowledge required to understand even very simple natural language texts is discussed and it is suggested that networks of frames are a reasonable approach to represent such knowledge.
Abstract: : A partial theory is presented of thinking, combining a number of classical and modern concepts from psychology, linguistics, and AI. In a new situation one selects from memory a structure called a frame: a remembered framework to be adapted to fit reality by changing details as necessary, and a data-structure for representing a stereotyped situation. Attached to each frame are several kinds of information -- how to use the frame, what one can expect to happen next, and what to do if these expectations are not confirmed. The report discusses collections of related frames that are linked together into frame-systems.

5,812 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The Electronic Word as mentioned in this paper surveys the effects of electronic text on the arts and letters and explores how electronic text fulfills the expressive agenda of twentieth-century visual art and music, revolutionizes the curriculum, democratizes the instruments of art, and poses anew the cultural accountability of humanism itself.
Abstract: From the Publisher: The personal computer has revolutionized communication, and digitized text has introduced a radically new medium of expression. Interactive, volatile, mixing word and image, the electronic word challenges our assumptions about the shape of culture itself. This highly acclaimed collection of Richard Lanham's witty, provocative, and engaging essays surveys the effects of electronic text on the arts and letters. Lanham explores how electronic text fulfills the expressive agenda of twentieth-century visual art and music, revolutionizes the curriculum, democratizes the instruments of art, and poses anew the cultural accountability of humanism itself. Persuading us with uncommon grace and power that the move from book to screen gives cause for optimism, not despair, Lanham proclaims that "electronic expression has come not to destroy the Western arts but to fulfill them." The Electronic Word is also available as a Chicago Expanded Book for your Macintosh®. This hypertext edition allows readers to move freely through the text, marking "pages," annotating passages, searching words and phrases, and immediately accessing annotations, which have been enhanced for this edition. In a special prefatory essay, Lanham introduces the features of this electronic edition and gives a vividly applied critique of this dynamic new edition.

482 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

272 citations

Book
21 Jan 1996
TL;DR: This article surveys the pressures that are leading to the impending change from print journals to electronic ones and makes predictions about the future of journals, publishers, and libraries, concluding that the new electronic publishing methods are likely to improve greatly scholarly communication, partially through more rapid publication, but also through wider dissemination and a variety of novel features that cannot be implemented with the present print system.
Abstract: Scholarly publishing is on the verge of a drastic change from print journals to electronic ones. Although this change has been predicted for a long time, trends in technology and growth in the literature are making this transition inevitable. It is likely to occur in a few years, and is likely to be sudden. This article surveys the pressures that are leading to the impending change, and makes predictions about the future of journals, publishers, and libraries. The new electronic publishing methods are likely to improve greatly scholarly communication, partially through more rapid publication, but also through wider dissemination and a variety of novel features that cannot be implemented with the present print system, such as references in a paper to later papers that cite it.

272 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The 4th revolution after speech, writing and print, is skywriting (email, hypermail, web-based archiving).
Abstract: The 4th revolution after speech, writing and print, is skywriting (email, hypermail, web-based archiving).

267 citations


"This Is Not a Paper" refers background in this paper

  • ...(Harnad, 1991) Psycoloquy is a publication in which original work is presented, along with commentary and rebuttals, in an ongo- ing, iterative manner.9 Such approaches to scholarship, Harnad argues, begin to exploit the unique potential of electronic media, with their capacity for rapid, direct,…...

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