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Journal ArticleDOI

Towards the hybrid essay: The 'Visual Essay Project'

22 Dec 2011-Journal of Writing in Creative Practice-Vol. 4, Iss: 2, pp 131-140
About: This article is published in Journal of Writing in Creative Practice.The article was published on 2011-12-22. It has received 8 citations till now.
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: It is suggested that student learning of design theory and history can be enhanced when creative practice methods are employed within a critical studies context.
Abstract: This study presents and discusses the outcomes of an action research inquiry that set out to enhance novice first year visual communication student learning of design theory and history through the incorporation of creative practice methods commonly used in practical design studio environments. The methods involving creative thinking, visualization, collaboration and presenting to an audience are described as interventions, introduced to support the critical and analytical thinking necessary to engage with theoretical discourse. They can also be thought of as learning strategies incorporated to enhance student learning. As educators of both design theory and practice, our previous observations of how novice design students engaged with theory, in comparison to how they engaged with practice, led us to the decision that change was required; change which would facilitate deeper understanding of theoretical discourse through the incorporation of creative practice methods. That was our “call to action”. Academic discourse in design education is no longer the exclusive domain of the written word. Our findings suggest that student learning of design theory and history can be enhanced when creative practice methods are employed within a critical studies context.

1 citations


Cites background from "Towards the hybrid essay: The 'Visu..."

  • ...…intuitive and emotional (Collinson 2005, pp.716-717); visual-spatial (Lockheart et al. 2004, p.97); Yee 2012, p.471); tacit learning and knowing (McCannon 2011, p.133); aesthetic learning and knowing (Irwin 2003, p.63); and visual thinking (Blackler 2014); (Edwards & Woolf 2007, p.55); (Grow…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors identified studies in design education literature with three categories; conceptual and empirical studies, as well as instructional cases, and revealed four major themes with 18 sub-themes in which writing can render the design education discourse.
Abstract: Abstract In pursuit of constructivist learning, design education can benefit from various methods, tools and applications that directly influence learners’ design processes. In this sense, writing has become prominent as a learning and teaching tool with the attention of both design teachers and design researchers. However, there is no particular study addressing a comprehensive characterization of writing-related studies in design education within the existing literature. Through this scoping literature review, we sought answers about how writing serves as a pedagogical vehicle in design education. To achieve this, we extracted and identified studies in design education literature with three categories; conceptual and empirical studies, as well as instructional cases. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes with 18 sub-themes in which writing can render the design education discourse. Briefly, through a wide range of writing formats, writing can promote processes, develop skills, utilize tools and deal with issues regarding design.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored student perceptions and experiences of design writing, with data surfacing themes of anxiety, identity, artefact, articulation, process and value, and suggested how to support students to write about design praxis.
Abstract: Undergraduate design students at London College of Communication were interviewed about the relationship between their writing practice and their design practice Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences (1983) framed the study This article takes the position that polarizing the relationship between linguistic (textual) and bodily kinaesthetic (visual) forms of intelligence itself becomes a barrier to arts students’ epistemological development The well-rehearsed art school rhetoric of ‘I’m a visual person not a writer’ can become a self-fulfilling prophecy, disabling the potential to learn through writing The research explored student perceptions and experiences of design writing, with data surfacing themes of anxiety, identity, artefact, articulation, process and value Suggestions about how to support students to write about design praxis are presented for consideration