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Book ChapterDOI

Transforming Education for Museum Professionals in the Digital Age

01 Jan 2019-pp 457-480
TL;DR: This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.
Abstract: As the digital revolution accelerates, one of the most significant impacts that museums are experiencing, is how digital development is changing the very nature of work across the professions and disciplines from art and humanities to computer science and technology. Simply put—work and life are merging and becoming increasingly digital and cross-disciplinary, as they are absorbed into the digital ecosystem. Museums are recognizing that the digital shift is causing them to re-think the skills and knowledge their professional staff needs and are challenged to find effective strategies to respond to changes brought about by digital culture and related social and cultural issues, while graduate education for museum professionals is similarly challenged. As a case study, we consider Pratt Institute’s Master of Science in Museums and Digital Culture, introduced in 2015 by Giannini. Representing the first master’s degree of its kind, it offers a program set in a digital framework that encompasses the full range of museum activities and functions in contrast to the prevalent museum studies model taking a more traditional collection-centered approach. Over the past few years, the work of museum professionals behind the scenes has become increasingly carried out using digital tools and technologies, from collection management including digitization and access, to museum websites and social media, while using digital in galleries and exhibitions is an emerging area of critical focus aimed at developing digital strategies and methods for visitor engagement and experience and that expand the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals. Among digital advances, augmented and virtual reality, digital storytelling and artificial intelligence, are entering the mainstream of museum life, more fully immersing museums in the digital culture ecosystem. This chapter explores how education for museum professionals is transforming, as it responds to the need for graduates to possess digital skills and a deep knowledge and understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which museums are evolving.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the reaction of Italian state museums to the closure of their physical sites caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, taking the perspective of their online activity on social media.

117 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed a questionnaire to evaluate teachers' perceptions on the use of AR for heritage teaching (n = 347 teachers: n = 131 in-service/n = 216 in-training).
Abstract: As a consequence of the scarcity of studies of augmented reality (AR) in Spain, this study developed a questionnaire to evaluate teachers’ perceptions on the use of AR for heritage teaching (n = 347 teachers: n = 131 in-service/n = 216 in-training). The objectives were to: (1) identify teachers’ existing knowledge about AR; (2) evaluate educational strategies teachers value most in AR apps for teaching; (3) evaluate necessary AR functions; (4) determine desired technical and functional characteristics; and (5) compare any significant differences between the two groups. The results provide a contribution to the increasing implementation of AR apps in heritage education, which promotes the understanding, enjoyment, experience and knowledge of heritage. Heritage education is increasingly present in Spanish classrooms due to awareness of the country’s rich heritage, and AR is a good tool for understanding and linking society with its heritage. From the results, it is clear that, despite their desire for implementation, there is a lack of teacher training in applying AR; both subsamples pointed out the importance of humanising the explanations in AR apps with experts or actors who mediate heritage and value the ease of use of these apps, multifunctionality, low battery consumption, and use in the background. Significant differences suggest potentially greater educational commitment among active teachers who seek deep and meaningful learning, above the superficiality and enjoyment reported by teachers in training and, on the contrary, the value placed on technical and visual aspects, related to the high use of mobile devices.

10 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2014
TL;DR: The CRe-AM project aims to bridge communities of creators with communities of technology providers and innovators, in a collective, strategic Roadmapping efford in order to streamline, coordinate and amplify collaborative work as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine and at last, you create what you will (George Bernard Shaw) The CRe-AM project aims to bridge communities of creators with communities of technology providers and innovators, in a collective, strategic Roadmapping efford in order to streamline, coordinate and amplify collaborative work. It will thereby develop, enhance, and mainstream new ICT technologies, processes and tools, to address the needs of different sectors of the creative industries (e.g. arts, culture, design, e-publishing, media, new media, architecture, music technology etc.).

4 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2023
References
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Journal ArticleDOI

1,004 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Jul 2014
TL;DR: Examples of the phenomenon of the "digital bubble" are explored, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general, and the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to the authors' ever more digital society are considered.
Abstract: Today's society is increasingly digitalised, with mobile smartphones being routinely carried and used by a significant percentage of the population. This provides an augmented experience for the individual that does not depend on their geographical separation with respect to their community of friends and other contacts. This changes the nature of relationships between people. Individuals may live in a "digital bubble", close to others physically, but far away from them in their digital world. More specifically, digital images can be generated and shared with ever greater ease. Sometimes the digital image takes on an important part of the individual's experience of reality. This paper explores examples of the phenomenon, within the context of the arts in particular and culture in general. We also consider the assortment of terms used in a variety of ways by researchers in different fields with regard to our ever more digital society, such as digitalism, digitality, digitalisation, digital culture, digital philosophy, etc. We survey these terms, exploring them from alternative viewpoints, including sociological and philosophical aspects, and attempt to pinpoint some of these terms more precisely, especially in a cultural and artistic context.

24 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Jul 2016
TL;DR: This study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning, and shows how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media.
Abstract: The space between digital life and real life continues to fade and nowhere is this more apparent than in arts and cultural contexts. Facilitated by digital capture and curation, social media, the network, Internet, and the web, these forces combine to empower artists to be digital curators of their own work, giving voice and narration to their artistic expression. In the paper entitled Digitalism: the New Realism, the authors focus on how digital tools and technology have changed ways of doing, knowing, and being, while here we look at how today's digital landscape is changing ways of artistic expression, narration, communication, and human interaction. The growing use of digital tools and technology in the arts and culture is dramatically transforming traditional curatorial practice and by extension archival practice, so that we are moving from a gatekeeping model to an open model steeped in digital relationships across global networks and the Internet. As we immerse ourselves in the digital world, where anyone with a smartphone can be a digital curator and marshal a range of Internet services, such as Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and more specifically for example Behance (for online portfolios), artists are enabled to freely engage and interact with their audience using to their advantage crowdsourcing, "likes", chat, blogs, games and email. Emerging artists are particularly expert digitally and are able to curate their life and work directly, living naturally between physical and digital states. To demonstrate this, our study presents specific examples of how artists and GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museum) institutions are adapting to new digital ways of curating collections and conveying meaning. Additionally, we show how notions of what constitutes artistic expression are evolving as art traverses digital media boundaries, especially in terms of visual and textual media. Importantly, as life in the 21st century plays out on the digital stage of the Internet, artists and GLAM institutions find themselves more than ever working at the intersection of art and information which is leading to new and innovative ways of curating contemporary art that are expressive of artistic vision and digital aesthetics, while conveying social and political meaning capable of influencing and impacting our lives.

17 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2017
TL;DR: How digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage is examined.
Abstract: Claude Shannon (1916–2001) is regarded as the father of information theory. Alan Turing (1912–1954) is known as the father of computer science. In the year 1943, Shannon and Turing were both at Bell Labs in New York City, although working on different projects. They had discussions together, including about Turing’s “Universal Machine,” a type of computational brain. Turing seems quite surprised that in a sea of code and computers, Shannon envisioned the arts and culture as an integral part of the digital revolution – a digital DNA of sorts. What was dreamlike in 1943, is today a reality, as digital representation of all media, accounts for millions of “cultural things” and massive music collections. The early connections that Shannon made between the arts, information, and computing, intuit the future that we are experiencing today. This paper considers foundational aspects of the digital revolution, the current state, and the possible future. It examines how digital life is increasingly becoming part of real life for more and more people around the world, especially with respect to the arts, culture, and heritage.

16 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Jul 2018
TL;DR: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society.
Abstract: This one-day Symposium explored themes of personhood, modernity and digital art, bringing together speakers from a range of disciplines to consider technology, artistic practice and society. It seeks a renewed consideration of the role of art in illuminating human identity in a positive relation with technology, and its transformative effects upon space and time. The concerns for the role of art amidst the forces of a post-modern world are influenced by important legacies of the past, by which ideas about human identity and difference have been made meaningful in the relation of history and technology. In the frequently transient and conflicting forces of humanness and forces of modernity, the digital world of the arts emerges as a means by which new ideas of space and time can be considered, with new perspectives of human identity seen as states of being, towards the possibilities of experience, technology, individuality and society.

13 citations

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How does digitalizations impact museum?

Digitalization is changing the nature of work in museums and challenging them to rethink the skills and knowledge their staff needs.