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Journal ArticleDOI

Trust, ethical climate and nurses' turnover intention.

01 Aug 2021-Nursing Ethics (SAGE PublicationsSage UK: London, England)-Vol. 28, Iss: 5, pp 969733020964855-969733020964855

TL;DR: The results suggest that nurse managers and leaders should try and establish principled and benevolent climates in order to engender trust in organization and to reduce turnover intention.
Abstract: Background:Nursing turnover is a very serious problem, and nursing managers need to be aware of how ethical climates are associated with turnover intention.Objectives:The article explored the effec...
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: While prior studies have highlighted the brighter side of technology adoption in improving human resource (HR) functions, the dark side pertaining to the adoption of technology in people management within organizations has gone relatively unnoticed. The current study tries to demystify the dark side of electronic human resource management (e-HRM) by examining banking institutions in India which are believed to have undergone several transformations in recent years.,This study adopts an inductive qualitative approach to examine the research problem. In total, 53 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the employees of eight public sector banks in India. The interviews were transcribed. The analysis of the data was done using the thematic analysis technique.,The findings of the study suggest that there is a stratification of the workplace in banking institutions into digital natives and digital migrants. This social stratification is based on technology adoption and usage which has further created problems in the form of knowledge hiding and perceived workplace conflicts.,The findings of the current study have important theoretical and managerial implications. It not only extends the current scholarship on the transtheoretical model of change but it also has strong managerial implications as it highlights the need for the adoption of customized e-HRM training curriculums for the workforce based on their age, education, work experience and expertise.,Current research on the dark side of e-HRM is inadequate. Furthermore, the evolution of banking institutions from being a typical bureaucratic organization into a hybrid one has not been examined in the context of e-HRM.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Aims To examine the relationship between nurses' perception about human resource management system and prosocial organisational behaviour through job efficacy. Background Literature suggests that non-profit organisations are often confronted with financial constraints on one side and the expectation of delivering high-quality services on the other. Employees voluntarily engaging in service-oriented behaviours help to bridge this gap to some extent, and human resource management system plays a significant role in eliciting the requisite behaviours. In this article, the case of nurses from non-profit hospitals has been undertaken to examine the aspects of human resource management system that needs focus while promoting prosocial organisational behaviours among the nurses for ensuring better service delivery. Method Cross-sectional design was employed. Data were collected from 387 nurses working in non-profit hospitals in India through questionnaires and were analysed with the help of structural equation modelling. Findings In the absence of sophisticated human resource system in non-profit hospitals, the study found that nurses' perception about human resource management system is positively related to prosocial organisational behaviours, and job efficacy partially mediates the relationship. Conclusion Positive perceptions such as involvement with the job and communication as well as supervisors' support are essential human resource practices for fostering self-efficacy and, thus, improving prosocial organisational behaviour of nurses working in non-profit hospitals. Implication for nursing management Non-profit hospitals should focus on nurses' participation and supervisory support, which would provide a better human touch approach to patient care and also improve service quality. The findings shed light on the nursing management of non-profit hospitals in terms of human resource management that has to be given much attention for institutionalizing prosocial organisational behaviour.

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Oct 2021-Women and Birth
Abstract: Problem Australian midwives are considering leaving the profession. Moral distress may be a contributing factor, yet there is limited research regarding the influence of moral distress on midwifery practice. Background Moral distress was first used to describe the psychological harm incurred following actions or inactions that oppose an individuals’ moral values. Current research concerning moral distress in midwifery is varied and often focuses only on one aspect of practice. Aim To explore Australian midwives experience and consequences of moral distress. Methods Semi-structured interviews were used to understand the experiences of moral distress of 14 Australian midwives. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and NVIVO12©. Findings Three key themes were identified: experiencing moral compromise; experiencing moral constraints, dilemmas and uncertainties; and professional and personal consequences. Describing hierarchical and oppressive health services, midwives indicated they were unable to adequately advocate for themselves, their profession, and the women in their care. Discussion It is evident that some midwives experience significant and often ongoing moral compromise as a catalyst to moral distress. A difference in outcomes between early career midwives and those with more than five years experiences suggests the cumulative nature of moral distress is a significant concern. A possible trajectory across moral frustration, moral distress, and moral injury with repeated exposure to morally compromising situations could explain this finding. Conclusion This study affirms the presence of moral distress in Australian midwives and identified the cumulative effect of moral compromise on the degree of moral distress experienced.

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Philip M. Podsakoff1, Dennis W. Organ1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Self-reports figure prominently in organizational and management research, but there are several problems associated with their use. This article identifies six categories of self-reports and discusses such problems as common method variance, the consistency motif, and social desirability. Statistical and post hoc remedies and some procedural methods for dealing with artifactual bias are presented and evaluated. Recommendations for future research are also offered.

12,813 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Robert M. O'Brien1Institutions (1)
13 Mar 2007-Quality & Quantity
Abstract: The Variance Inflation Factor (VIF) and tolerance are both widely used measures of the degree of multi-collinearity of the ith independent variable with the other independent variables in a regression model. Unfortunately, several rules of thumb – most commonly the rule of 10 – associated with VIF are regarded by many practitioners as a sign of severe or serious multi-collinearity (this rule appears in both scholarly articles and advanced statistical textbooks). When VIF reaches these threshold values researchers often attempt to reduce the collinearity by eliminating one or more variables from their analysis; using Ridge Regression to analyze their data; or combining two or more independent variables into a single index. These techniques for curing problems associated with multi-collinearity can create problems more serious than those they solve. Because of this, we examine these rules of thumb and find that threshold values of the VIF (and tolerance) need to be evaluated in the context of several other factors that influence the variance of regression coefficients. Values of the VIF of 10, 20, 40, or even higher do not, by themselves, discount the results of regression analyses, call for the elimination of one or more independent variables from the analysis, suggest the use of ridge regression, or require combining of independent variable into a single index.

6,025 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Sandra L. Robinson1Institutions (1)
Abstract: I would like to thank Karl Aquino, Joel Brockner, Daniel Forbes, Matthew Kraatz, Judi McLean Parks, Alexandra Mithel, Lynn Shore, Jon Turner, Linn Van Dyne, Batia Wiesenfeld, Dale Zand, and four anonymous reviewers for their helpful assistance with this manuscript. This paper examines the theoretical and empirical relationships between employees' trust in their employers and their experiences of psychological contract breach by their employers, using data from a longitudinal field of 125 newly hired managers. Data were collected at three points in time over a two-and-a-half-year period: after the new hires negotiated and accepted an offer of employment; after 18 months on the job; and after 30 months on the job. Results show that the relationship between trust and psychological contract breach is strong and multifaceted. Initial trust in one's employer at time of hire was negatively related to psychological contract breach after 18 months on the job. Further, trust (along with unmet expectations) mediated the relationship between psychological contract breach and employees' subsequent contributions to the firm. Finally, initial trust in one's employer at the time of hire moderated the relationship between psychological contract breach and subsequent trust such that those with high initial trust experienced less decline in trust after a breach than did those with low initial trust.

2,730 citations


"Trust, ethical climate and nurses' ..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Trust in Organization: Trust in organization was measured by a four-item scale adapted from Robinson.(26) A sample item is ‘I am confident that my hospital will treat me fairly’....

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Posted Content
Bart Victor1, John B. Cullen2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Using a modification of a recently developed measure of ethical climates, this paper presents evidence from a survey of 872 employees of four firms that ethical cork climates are both multidimensional and multidetermined. The study demonstrates that organizations have distinct types of ethical climates and that there is variance in the ethical within organizations by position, tenure, and workgroup membership. Five empirically derived dimensions of ethical climate are described: law and code, caring, instrumentalism, independence, and rules. Analyses of variance reveal significant differences in ethical climates both across and within firms. A theory of ethical climates is developed from organizational and economic theory to describe the determinants of ethical climates in organizations. In particular, the sociocultural environment, organizational form, and organization-specific history are identified as determinants of ethical climates in organizations. The implications of ethical climate for organizational theory are also discussed.

1,868 citations


"Trust, ethical climate and nurses' ..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...One theoretical framework that is applicable here is Ethical Climate Theory (ECT).(12) Ethical climates are employees’ perceptions of what practices and ethical issues are considered right or wrong in an organization....

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  • ...These items were obtained from the ECT scale created by Victor and Cullen.(12) This yielded two 4-item scales....

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  • ...These items were obtained from the ECT scale created by Victor and Cullen.12 This yielded two 4-item scales....

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  • ...The benevolence construct is based on concern for others, while the principle construct is based on adherence to rules and laws.(12) We believe that these two climates are particularly appropriate in the context of nursing, because both the constructs of benevolence and principle apply very aptly to the nursing profession itself....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Bart Victor1, John B. Cullen2Institutions (2)
Abstract: This research was funded through the Interdisciplinary Program in Applied Ethics, College of Law, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, by a grant from the Peter Kiewit Sons, Inc. Foundation and the Peter Kiewit Foundation. The authors gratefully acknowledge the valuable guidance and insights provided by Marshall Meyer and four anonymous ASQ reviewers. We would also like to thank Tomoaki Sakano and Daniel Ganster for their helpful comments during the formative stages of this manuscript. Using a modification of a recently developed measure of ethical climates, this paper presents evidence from a survey of 872 employees of four firms that ethical work climates are both multidimensional and multidetermined. The study demonstrates that organizations have distinct types of ethical climates and that there is variance in the ethical climate within organizations by position, tenure, and workgroup membership. Five empirically derived dimensions of ethical climate are described: law and code, caring, instrumentalism, independence, and rules. Analyses of variance reveal significant differences in ethical climates both across and within firms. A theory of ethical climates is developed from organization and economic theory to describe the determinants of ethical climates in organizations. In particular, the sociocultural environment, organizational form, and organization-specific history are identified as determinants of the ethical climates in organizations. The implications of ethical climate for organizational theory are also discussed.'

1,622 citations


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