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Journal ArticleDOI

Tudor Family Portrait.

01 Jan 1956-The Economic History Review-Vol. 9, Iss: 1, pp 141
About: This article is published in The Economic History Review.The article was published on 1956-01-01. It has received 15 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Family Portrait.
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Ryrie as discussed by the authors argues that during the last decade of Henry VIII's life, his Protestant subjects struggled to reconcile two loyalties: to their Gospel and to their king, and describes how a radicalised English Protestantism emerged from it.
Abstract: During the last decade of Henry VIII’s life, his Protestant subjects struggled to reconcile two loyalties: to their Gospel and to their king. This book tells the story of that struggle and describes how a radicalised English Protestantism emerged from it. Focusing on the critical but neglected period 1539–47, Dr Ryrie argues that these years were not the ‘conservative reaction’ of conventional historiography, but a time of political fluidity and ambiguity. Most evangelicals continued to hope that the king would favour their cause, and remained doctrinally moderate and politically conformist. The author examines this moderate reformism in a range of settings - in the book trade, in the universities, at court and in underground congregations. He also describes its gradual eclipse, as shifting royal policy and the dynamics of the evangelical movement itself pushed reformers towards the more radical, confrontational Protestantism which was to shape the English identity for centuries. • The book focuses on the final years of Henry VIII’s reign, a critical and neglected period of the early Reformation • It offers an original analysis of the origins of England’s Protestant culture • The book places early Reformation theology in its historical, social and political setting

39 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2003

3 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2003

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 2003
TL;DR: English evangelicals did not take the paths of exile or of outright rejection of the regime, but instead, they waited for the world to turn and the fortunes of officially sponsored reform to rise again this paper.
Abstract: And Elia came vnto all the people, and sayde: how long halte ye betwene two opynions? I Kings 18:21 A LOYAL OPPOSITION After the coup against Thomas Cromwell in 1540 failed to become a full-scale purge, most of the leaders of English evangelicalism did not take the paths of exile or of outright rejection of the regime. Instead, they waited for the world to turn and the fortunes of officially sponsored reform to rise again. In the meantime, they continued working to spread the evangelical message, to build up the evangelical community and to call the nation as a whole to repentance. It was a mission which they shared with their exiled brethren, but which they pursued in a very different way. The ambiguities of late Henrician religious politics and the moderation of their own beliefs led these evangelical preachers and authors to engage constructively with their opponents in a way that more radical reformers could not or would not. The result was the emergence of a new and highly distinctive strain of evangelicalism. Over the winter of 1540–1, the new limits within which evangelicals were going to have to operate became plain. Edward Crome's confrontation with Nicholas Wilson over Masses for the dead was the most public drama of these months, but two other incidents which excited less public comment were of more long-term importance. In the wake of Cromwell's fall, an anonymous ballad appeared, reviling him as traitor and heretic.

2 citations