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Journal ArticleDOI

Twilight Memories. Marking Time in a Culture of Amnesia

TL;DR: In a recent collection of essays on memory and amnesia in the postmodern world, cultural critic Andreas Huyssen considers how nationalism, literature, art, politics, and the media are obsessed with the past.
Abstract: In this new collection of essays on memory and amnesia in the postmodern world, cultural critic Andreas Huyssen considers how nationalism, literature, art, politics, and the media are obsessed with the past. The great paradox of our fin-de-siecle culture is that novelty is even more associated with memory than with future expectation. Drawing heavily on the dilemmas of contemporary Germany, Huyssen's discussion of cultural memory illustrates the nature of contemporary nationalism, the work of such artists and thinkers as Anselm Kiefer, Alexander Kluge, and Jean Baudrillard, and many others. The book includes illustrations from contemporary Germany.
Citations
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01 Jul 2007
TL;DR: The Challenge to Care in SchooL·: An Alternative Approach to Education as discussed by the authors is a good example of such an approach, focusing on ways in which students can be reflective, curious, and caring in all school subjects, with all people, and with our environment.
Abstract: The Challenge to Care in Schools: An Alternative Approach to Education Nel Noddings. New York: Teachers College Press, 2005. 193 pages. ISBN: 0-8077-4609-6Reviewed by Karen A. Heid and Zach KelehearUniversity of South CarolinaMath instruction and learning matter. Science instruction and learning matter. And, to show how much they matter, federal and state policy makers (if we use NCLB mandates as evidence) emphasize that teachers should spend copious amounts of time, energy and money preparing students for standardized assessments of those content areas. One might conclude, in fact, that the more often something is assessed, then the more important it must be.In keeping with this line of thinking, other curriculum offerings that are of value should act and look more like math and science. This tension is also an argument not unfamiliar to some scholats who must negotiate the perceived value between arts-based research and qualitative studies versus quantitative analysis. NeI Noddings, in this recasting of her earlier 1992 work, asserts that what matters most is not a debate characterized as either- or m terms of what part of the curriculum is most important or how often it should be assessed. Rather, she frames the debate about what matters most in today's schools as a measure of how students and teachers can create a context for cultivating care. Whether die pedagogical practice or curricular assumptions be progressive or traditional, whether die subject be mathematics or art, Noddings notes that the essential conversation should be one focusing on ways in which we might help students be reflective, curious, and caring in all school subjects, with all people, and with our environment. It is this notion of what we call the "cult of care" that guides her analysis and discussion in this 2005 edition The Challenge to Care in SchooL·: An Alternative Approach to Education.In this review, we consider three aspects of Noddings' work, with particular attention to their applications to art education. First, we discuss her guiding principles and assumptions regarding the notion of care. Secondly, we reflect on her assertions regarding assessment and the focus on disciplines as related to discipline-based art education (DBAE). Lastly, we detail her view of care as the binding thread for all curricula in a global and democratic society.Noddings establishes throughout her book that care is the sine qua non for authentic learning. And by authentic (our word), she is considering learning where students are collaborators in both the selection of subject and the development of understanding. But for Noddings, care is not a matter of looking after someone or sympathizing with another ... or worse, pitying another. Noddings explains: "An ethic of care embodies a relational view of caring; that is, when I speak of caring, my emphasis is on the relation containing carer and cared-for" (p. xv). It is this bidirectional nature of caring that moves Noddings assertions away from care as solely one person's responsibility.In many ways, Noddings' notion of care requires a major shift in the nature of power and responsibility in school cultures. Can care be something that a teacher brings to a child? Certainly there are many giving teachers who care for their students. Many of us have heard good people, who happen also to be teachers, speak of their love for their young charges. But for Noddings, this notion of giving care is only half of the necessary equation. In order to balance the equation, care must also be reciprocated, and it is the responsibility of the teacher, in large part, to cultivate an environment that supports such an egalitarian context. In order for such an equitable process to emerge, one that certainly reflects notions of a democratic society, teachers must relinquish some of the power and control that many jealously protect in today's classrooms.Reciprocal, egalitarian, openness, honesty, fairness, collaboration, reflection-these and other characteristics are the descriptors of Noddings' school built on care. …

598 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018

60 citations


Cites background from "Twilight Memories. Marking Time in ..."

  • ...Film and literature have explored the different facets of German multiculturalism. Films such as Fatih Akin’s Gegen die Wand (2004) illustrate that Germans define themselves as a pluralistic and diverse people and nation, and this helps characterise what is ostensibly a newly defined self-imaginary of Germany (Wasmer 163)....

    [...]

  • ...Auswärtige Kultur- und Bildungspolitik (the German model of cultural diplomacy) began around the 14 century when the first German school opened in Estonia. German Protestant schools catering for German speaking minorities in Stockholm (1569), Copenhagen (1575) and Moscow (1626) followed (Abelein 107)....

    [...]

Dissertation
09 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, a reserva de drets afecta tant al resum de presentació de la tesi com als seus continguts, i.e., the presentaciò del seu contingut in una finestra o marc aliè a TDX (framing).
Abstract: condicions d'ús: La difusió d’aquesta tesi per mitjà del servei TDX (www.tesisenxarxa.net) ha estat autoritzada pels titulars dels drets de propietat intel·lectual únicament per a usos privats emmarcats en activitats d’investigació i docència. No s’autoritza la seva reproducció amb finalitats de lucre ni la seva difusió i posada a disposició des d’un lloc aliè al servei TDX. No s’autoritza la presentació del seu contingut en una finestra o marc aliè a TDX (framing). Aquesta reserva de drets afecta tant al resum de presentació de la tesi com als seus continguts. En la utilització o cita de parts de la tesi és obligat indicar el nom de la persona autora.

46 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Social memory studies is a nonparadigmatic, transdisciplinary, centerless enterprise as discussed by the authors, and despite substantial work in a variety of disciplines, substantive areas, and geographical contexts, social memory studies are a non paradigmatic and non-disciplinary enterprise.
Abstract: Despite substantial work in a variety of disciplines, substantive areas, and geographical contexts, social memory studies is a nonparadigmatic, transdisciplinary, centerless enterprise. To remedy this relative disorganization, we (re-)construct out of the diversity of work addressing social memory a useful tradition, range of working definitions, and basis for future work. We trace lineages of the enterprise, review basic definitional disputes, outline a historical approach, and review sociological theories concerning the statics and dynamics of social memory.

1,427 citations

01 Jul 2007
TL;DR: The Challenge to Care in SchooL·: An Alternative Approach to Education as discussed by the authors is a good example of such an approach, focusing on ways in which students can be reflective, curious, and caring in all school subjects, with all people, and with our environment.
Abstract: The Challenge to Care in Schools: An Alternative Approach to Education Nel Noddings. New York: Teachers College Press, 2005. 193 pages. ISBN: 0-8077-4609-6Reviewed by Karen A. Heid and Zach KelehearUniversity of South CarolinaMath instruction and learning matter. Science instruction and learning matter. And, to show how much they matter, federal and state policy makers (if we use NCLB mandates as evidence) emphasize that teachers should spend copious amounts of time, energy and money preparing students for standardized assessments of those content areas. One might conclude, in fact, that the more often something is assessed, then the more important it must be.In keeping with this line of thinking, other curriculum offerings that are of value should act and look more like math and science. This tension is also an argument not unfamiliar to some scholats who must negotiate the perceived value between arts-based research and qualitative studies versus quantitative analysis. NeI Noddings, in this recasting of her earlier 1992 work, asserts that what matters most is not a debate characterized as either- or m terms of what part of the curriculum is most important or how often it should be assessed. Rather, she frames the debate about what matters most in today's schools as a measure of how students and teachers can create a context for cultivating care. Whether die pedagogical practice or curricular assumptions be progressive or traditional, whether die subject be mathematics or art, Noddings notes that the essential conversation should be one focusing on ways in which we might help students be reflective, curious, and caring in all school subjects, with all people, and with our environment. It is this notion of what we call the "cult of care" that guides her analysis and discussion in this 2005 edition The Challenge to Care in SchooL·: An Alternative Approach to Education.In this review, we consider three aspects of Noddings' work, with particular attention to their applications to art education. First, we discuss her guiding principles and assumptions regarding the notion of care. Secondly, we reflect on her assertions regarding assessment and the focus on disciplines as related to discipline-based art education (DBAE). Lastly, we detail her view of care as the binding thread for all curricula in a global and democratic society.Noddings establishes throughout her book that care is the sine qua non for authentic learning. And by authentic (our word), she is considering learning where students are collaborators in both the selection of subject and the development of understanding. But for Noddings, care is not a matter of looking after someone or sympathizing with another ... or worse, pitying another. Noddings explains: "An ethic of care embodies a relational view of caring; that is, when I speak of caring, my emphasis is on the relation containing carer and cared-for" (p. xv). It is this bidirectional nature of caring that moves Noddings assertions away from care as solely one person's responsibility.In many ways, Noddings' notion of care requires a major shift in the nature of power and responsibility in school cultures. Can care be something that a teacher brings to a child? Certainly there are many giving teachers who care for their students. Many of us have heard good people, who happen also to be teachers, speak of their love for their young charges. But for Noddings, this notion of giving care is only half of the necessary equation. In order to balance the equation, care must also be reciprocated, and it is the responsibility of the teacher, in large part, to cultivate an environment that supports such an egalitarian context. In order for such an equitable process to emerge, one that certainly reflects notions of a democratic society, teachers must relinquish some of the power and control that many jealously protect in today's classrooms.Reciprocal, egalitarian, openness, honesty, fairness, collaboration, reflection-these and other characteristics are the descriptors of Noddings' school built on care. …

598 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history and memory industry has been a hot topic in the last few decades as discussed by the authors, with a renewed interest in memorization as an object of study in the field of history and history.
Abstract: WELCOME TO THE MEMORY INDUSTRY. In the grand scheme ofthings, the memory industry ranges from the museum trade to the legal battles over repressed memory and on to the market for academic books and articles that invoke memory as key word. Our scholarly fascination with things memorable is quite new. As Jeffrey K. Olick and Joyce Robbins have noted, "collective memory" emerged as an object of scholarly inquiry only in the early twentieth century, contemporaneous with the so-called crisis of historicism. Hugo von Hofmannsthal used the phrase "collective memory" in 1902, and in 1925 Maurice Halbwachs's The Social Frameworks of Memory argued, against Henri Bergson and Sigmund Freud, that memory is a specifically social phenomenon. But outside of experimental psychology and clinical psychoanalysis, few academics paid much attention to memory until the great swell of popular interest in autobiographical literature, family genealogy, and museums that marked the seventies. 1 The scholarly boom began in the 1980s with two literary events: Yosef Yerushalmi's Zakhor: jewish History and jewish Memory (1982) and Pierre Nora's "Between Memory and History," the introduction to an anthology, Lieux de me'moire (1984). Each of these texts identified memory as a primitive or sacred form opposed to modern historical consciousness. For Yerushalmi, the Jews were the archetypal people of memory who had adopted history only recently and then only in part, for "modern Jewish historiography can never replace an eroded group memory." For Nora, memory was an archaic mode of being that had been devastated by rationalization: "We speak so much of memory because there is so little of it left." Despite or perhaps because of their elegiac tone and accounts of memory as antihistorical discourse, these works found an amazing popularity and were quickly joined by others. In 1989 the translation of Nora's influential essay in a special issue of this journal and the founding of History and Memory, based in Tel Aviv and Los Angeles, showed the crystallization of a self-conscious memory discourse. A decade later the scholarly literature brims with such titles as "Sites of Memory" or "Cultural Memory" or "The Politics of Memory. "2 The emergence of memory as a key word marks a dramatic change in linguistic practice. We might be tempted to imagine the increasing use of memor as the natural result of an increased scholarly interest in the ways that popular and folk cultures

559 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors identify seven types of forgetting: repressive erasure, prescriptive forgetting, forgetting that is constitutive in the formation of a new identity, structural amnesia, annulment, planned obsolescence, humiliated silence, and humiliated silence.
Abstract: Much of the debate on cultural memory has been shaped by the view, commonly held if not universal, that remembering and commemorating is usually a virtue and that forgetting is necessarily a failing. But this assumption is not self-evidently true. This article seeks, therefore, to disentangle the different types of acts that cluster together under the single term `to forget'. I suggest that we can distinguish at least seven types: repressive erasure; prescriptive forgetting; forgetting that is constitutive in the formation of a new identity; structural amnesia; forgetting as annulment; forgetting as planned obsolescence; forgetting as humiliated silence.

545 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors assesses some of the major trends in this burgeoning literature, especially those works spatial in nature, which they find to be of considerable cross-disciplinary importance, and provide a modest overview of that critical, dynamic relationship.
Abstract: In recent years, investigations of social or cultural memory have become a major field of inquiry throughout the humanities and social sciences. No longer the sole preserve of psychology, the study of memory now extends to anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, literary studies, communication, history and, increasingly, to geography. This article assesses some of the major trends in this burgeoning literature, especially those works spatial in nature, which we find to be of considerable cross‐disciplinary importance. Together, memory and place conjoin to produce much of the context for modern identities; providing a modest overview of that critical, dynamic relationship, this article serves as an introduction to this special issue of Social & Cultural Geography.

415 citations