scispace - formally typeset

Book

Understanding Delta-Sigma Data Converters

08 Nov 2004-

TL;DR: This chapter discusses the design and simulation of delta-sigma modulator systems, and some of the considerations for implementation considerations for [Delta][Sigma] ADCs.

AbstractChapter 1: Introduction.Chapter 2: The first-order delta-sigma modulator.Chapter 3: The second-order delta-sigma modulator.Chapter 4: Higher-order delta-sigma modulation.Chapter 5: Bandpass and quadrature delta-sigma modulation.Chapter 6: Implementation considerations for [Delta][Sigma] ADCs.Chapter 7: Delta-sigma DACs.Chapter 8: High-level design and simulation.Chapter 9: Example modulator systems.Appendix A: Spectral estimation.Appendix B: The delta-sigma toolbox.Appendix C: Noise in switched-capacitor delta-sigma data converters.

Topics: Delta-sigma modulation (57%)

...read more

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Citations
More filters

Proceedings Article
06 Dec 2017
Abstract: Parallel implementations of stochastic gradient descent (SGD) have received significant research attention, thanks to its excellent scalability properties. A fundamental barrier when parallelizing SGD is the high bandwidth cost of communicating gradient updates between nodes; consequently, several lossy compresion heuristics have been proposed, by which nodes only communicate quantized gradients. Although effective in practice, these heuristics do not always guarantee convergence, and it is not clear whether they can be improved. In this paper, we propose Quantized SGD (QSGD), a family of compression schemes for gradient updates which provides convergence guarantees. QSGD allows the user to smoothly trade off \emph{communication bandwidth} and \emph{convergence time}: nodes can adjust the number of bits sent per iteration, at the cost of possibly higher variance. We show that this trade-off is inherent, in the sense that improving it past some threshold would violate information-theoretic lower bounds. QSGD guarantees convergence for convex and non-convex objectives, under asynchrony, and can be extended to stochastic variance-reduced techniques. When applied to training deep neural networks for image classification and automated speech recognition, QSGD leads to significant reductions in end-to-end training time. For example, on 16GPUs, we can train the ResNet152 network to full accuracy on ImageNet 1.8x faster than the full-precision variant.

753 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper offers the first in-depth look at the vast applications of THz wireless products and applications and provides approaches for how to reduce power and increase performance across several problem domains, giving early evidence that THz techniques are compelling and available for future wireless communications.
Abstract: Frequencies from 100 GHz to 3 THz are promising bands for the next generation of wireless communication systems because of the wide swaths of unused and unexplored spectrum. These frequencies also offer the potential for revolutionary applications that will be made possible by new thinking, and advances in devices, circuits, software, signal processing, and systems. This paper describes many of the technical challenges and opportunities for wireless communication and sensing applications above 100 GHz, and presents a number of promising discoveries, novel approaches, and recent results that will aid in the development and implementation of the sixth generation (6G) of wireless networks, and beyond. This paper shows recent regulatory and standard body rulings that are anticipating wireless products and services above 100 GHz and illustrates the viability of wireless cognition, hyper-accurate position location, sensing, and imaging. This paper also presents approaches and results that show how long distance mobile communications will be supported to above 800 GHz since the antenna gains are able to overcome air-induced attenuation, and present methods that reduce the computational complexity and simplify the signal processing used in adaptive antenna arrays, by exploiting the Special Theory of Relativity to create a cone of silence in over-sampled antenna arrays that improve performance for digital phased array antennas. Also, new results that give insights into power efficient beam steering algorithms, and new propagation and partition loss models above 100 GHz are given, and promising imaging, array processing, and position location results are presented. The implementation of spatial consistency at THz frequencies, an important component of channel modeling that considers minute changes and correlations over space, is also discussed. This paper offers the first in-depth look at the vast applications of THz wireless products and applications and provides approaches for how to reduce power and increase performance across several problem domains, giving early evidence that THz techniques are compelling and available for future wireless communications.

600 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
17 Nov 2008
TL;DR: This paper summarizes recent trends in the area of low-power A/D conversion and a discussion on minimalistic and digitally assisted design approaches is used to sketch a route toward further improvements in ADC power efficiency and performance.
Abstract: This paper summarizes recent trends in the area of low-power A/D conversion. Survey data collected over the past eleven years indicates that the power efficiency of ADCs has improved on average by a factor of two every two years. A closer inspection on the impact of technology scaling is presented to explain the observed trend in the context of shrinking supply voltages and increasing device speed. Finally, a discussion on minimalistic and digitally assisted design approaches is used to sketch a route toward further improvements in ADC power efficiency and performance.

276 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A tutorial description of the physical phenomena taking place in an SC circuit while it processes noise is provided and some specialized but highly efficient algorithms for estimating the resulting sampled noise in SC circuits are proposed, which need only simple calculations.
Abstract: Thermal noise represents a major limitation on the performance of most electronic circuits. It is particularly important in switched circuits, such as the switched-capacitor (SC) filters widely used in mixed-mode CMOS integrated circuits. In these circuits, switching introduces a boost in the power spectral density of the thermal noise due to aliasing. Unfortunately, even though the theory of noise in SC circuits is discussed in the literature, it is very intricate. The numerical calculation of noise in switched circuits is very tedious, and requires highly sophisticated and not widely available software. The purpose of this paper is twofold. It provides a tutorial description of the physical phenomena taking place in an SC circuit while it processes noise (Sections II-III). It also proposes some specialized but highly efficient algorithms for estimating the resulting sampled noise in SC circuits, which need only simple calculations (Sections IV-VI ). A practical design procedure, which follows directly from the estimate, is also described. The accuracy of the proposed estimation algorithms is verified by simulation using SpectreRF. As an example, it is applied to the estimation of the total thermal noise in a second-order low-distortion delta-sigma converter.

249 citations


Cites background from "Understanding Delta-Sigma Data Conv..."

  • ...More detailed discussion of some issues mentioned in this paper can be found in [4] and [5]....

    [...]

  • ...Assigning 75% of the noise power to thermal noise [4], the total permissible input-referred thermal noise power turns out to be...

    [...]


Posted Content
TL;DR: This work investigates massive multiple-input-multiple output (MIMO) uplink systems with 1-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) on each receiver antenna with good performance in terms of mutual information and symbol error rate (SER), and provides an analytical approach to calculate the Mutual information and SER of the MRC receiver.
Abstract: We investigate massive multiple-input-multiple output (MIMO) uplink systems with 1-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) on each receiver antenna. Receivers that rely on 1-bit ADC do not need energy-consuming interfaces such as automatic gain control (AGC). This decreases both ADC building and operational costs. Our design is based on maximal ratio combining (MRC), zero-forcing (ZF), and least squares (LS) detection, taking into account the effects of the 1-bit ADC on channel estimation. Through numerical results, we show good performance of the system in terms of mutual information and symbol error rate (SER). Furthermore, we provide an analytical approach to calculate the mutual information and SER of the MRC receiver. The analytical approach reduces complexity in the sense that a symbol and channel noise vectors Monte Carlo simulation is avoided.

237 citations


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Higher order modulators are shown not only to greatly reduce oversampling requirements for high-resolution conversion applications, but also to randomize the quantization noise, avoiding the need for dithering.
Abstract: Oversampling interpolative coding has been demonstrated to be an effective technique for high-resolution analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion that is tolerant of process imperfections. A novel topology for constructing stable interpolative modulators of arbitrary order is described. Analysis of this topology shows that with proper design of the modulator coefficients, stability is not a limitation to higher order modulators. Furthermore, complete control over placement of the poles and zeros of the quantization noise response allows treatment of the modulation process as a high-pass filter for quantization noise. Higher order modulators are shown not only to greatly reduce oversampling requirements for high-resolution conversion applications, but also to randomize the quantization noise, avoiding the need for dithering. An experimental fourth-order modulator breadboard demonstrates stability and feasibility, achieving a 90-dB dynamic range over the 20-kHz audio bandwidth with a sampling rate of 2.1 MHz. A generalized simulation software package has been developed to mimic time-domain behavior for oversampling modulators. Circuit design specifications for integrated circuit implementation can be deduced from analysis of simulated data. >

392 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
James C. Candy1
TL;DR: It is shown that digital filters comprising cascades of integrate-and-dump functions can match the structure of the noise from sigma delta modulation to provide decimation with negligible loss of signal-to-noise ratio.
Abstract: Decimation is an important component of oversampled analog-to-digital conversion. It transforms the digitally modulated signal from short words occurring at high sampling rate to longer words at the Nyquist rate. Here we are concerned with the initial stage of decimation, where the word rate decreases to about four times the Nyquist rate. We show that digital filters comprising cascades of integrate-and-dump functions can match the structure of the noise from sigma delta modulation to provide decimation with negligible loss of signal-to-noise ratio. Explicit formulas evaluate particular tradeoffs between modulation rate, signal-to-noise ratio, length of digital words, and complexity of the modulating and decimating functions.

339 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper introduces a new method of analysis for deltasigma modulators based on modeling the nonlinear quantizer with a linearized gain, obtained by minimizing a mean-square-error criterion, followed by an additive noise source representing distortion components.
Abstract: This paper introduces a new method of analysis for deltasigma modulators based on modeling the nonlinear quantizer with a linearized gain, obtained by minimizing a mean-square-error criterion [7], followed by an additive noise source representing distortion components. In the paper, input signal amplitude dependencies of delta-sigma modulator stability and signal-to-noise ratio are analyzed. It is shown that due to the nonlinearity of the quantizer, the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulator may decrease as the input amplitude increases prior to saturation. Also, a stable third-order delta-sigma modulator may become unstable by increasing the input amplitude beyond a certain threshold. Both of these phenomena are explained by the nonlinear analysis of this paper. The analysis is carried out for both dc and sinusoidal excitations.

276 citations


Book ChapterDOI
James C. Candy1, O. Benjamin1
TL;DR: Simple algebraic expressions for this modulation noise and its spectrum in terms of the input amplitude are derived and can be useful for designing oversampled analog to digital converters that use sigma-delta modulation for the primary conversion.
Abstract: When the sampling rate of a sigma-delta modulator far exceeds the frequencies of the input signal, its modulation noise is highly correlated with the amplitude of the input. We derive simple algebraic expressions for this noise and its spectrum in terms of the input amplitude. The results agree with measurements taken on a breadboard circuit. This work can be useful for designing oversampled analog to digital converters that use sigma-delta modulation for the primary conversion.

252 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1993
TL;DR: The modulator of a bandpass analog/digital (A/D) converter, with 63 dB signal/noise for broadcast AM bandwidth signals centered at 455 kHz, has been implemented by modifying a commercial digital-audio sigma-delta ( Sigma Delta ) converter.
Abstract: The modulator of a bandpass analog/digital (A/D) converter, with 63 dB signal/noise for broadcast AM bandwidth signals centered at 455 kHz, has been implemented by modifying a commercial digital-audio sigma-delta ( Sigma Delta ) converter. It is the first reported fully monolithic implementation of bandpass noise shaping and has applications to digital radio. >

210 citations