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BookDOI

Unspeakable Sentences (Routledge Revivals) : Narration and Representation in the Language of Fiction

17 Jul 2014-
TL;DR: The authors discuss subjectivity in direct and indirect speech, the absence of the narrator, and the development of narrative style in the context of linguistics and literature with a particular interest in narrative style and linguistic theory.
Abstract: First published in 1982, this title grew from a series of essays on various aspects of narrative style; the result is a finished product that melds literary theory with linguistic methodology. It is argued that, where linguistic theory intersects with literary theory, it is narrative that provides the crucial ‘experiment’ for deciding between a communication and a non-communication theory of language and, by extension, of literature. Chapters discuss such areas as subjectivity in direct and indirect speech, the absence of the narrator, and the development of narrative style. With a detailed introduction to the subject, this reissue will be of value to students of linguistics and literature with a particular interest in narrative style and linguistic theory.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors showed that the original strategy of explaining apparent shifting in terms of a quotational use/mention distinction offers a much more intuitive, parsimonious and empirically superior analysis of many of these phenomena, including direct-indirect switches in Ancient Greek, role shift in signed languages, free indirect discourse in literary narratives, and mixed quotation.
Abstract: Inspired by Schlenker’s (2003) seminal Plea for Monsters , linguists have been analyzing every occurrence of a shifted indexical by postulating a monstrous operator. The author’s aim in this paper is to show that Kaplan’s (1989) original strategy of explaining apparent shifting in terms of a quotational use/mention distinction offers a much more intuitive, parsimonious and empirically superior analysis of many of these phenomena, including direct–indirect switches in Ancient Greek, role shift in signed languages, free indirect discourse in literary narratives, and mixed quotation.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Erlebte Rede (free indirect style) as mentioned in this paper is a narrative technique used to present reports of consciousness which to some extent blends direct and indirect speech, which is characterized by the interaction of specific linguistic markers which allow the presentation of a character's point of view while simultaneously maintaining the narrative frame.
Abstract: Abstracts Erlebte Rede (free indirect style) is a narrative technique used to present reports of consciousness which to some extent blends direct and indirect speech. It is characterized by the interaction of specific linguistic markers which allow the presentation of a character’s point of view while simultaneously maintaining the narrative frame. A character’s thoughts are expressed in the third person, indicative and narrative tense giving the impression that the voice of both the narrator and the character somehow overlap. This contribution summarizes the research on erlebte Rede, focussing on German. Regarding narratological aspects, I discuss linguistic problems specific to identification and analysis of texts which employ erlebte Rede. This paper primarily addresses the use of erlebte Rede in fiction, although it is also found in non-fiction.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the grammatical characteristics of narrative discourse mode and their implications for a linguistic theory of narration have been investigated, and three central questions within the intersection between narrative micro- and macro-structures, namely the definition of narrativity, the status of the narrator, and the relation between narration and fictionality are discussed.
Abstract: Abstract Is there a ‚narrative syntax‘, i. e. a special grammar restricted to narrative fiction? Starting from this question which has been investigated since early structuralism, the paper focusses on grammatical characteristics of narrative discourse mode and their implications for a linguistic theory of narration. Its goal is two-fold: In a first step, the traditional accounts by Benveniste, Hamburger, Kuroda and recent typological studies are brought together in order to support the claim that the distinction between narrative and non-narrative discourse mode is a fundamental one that has consequences for the use of grammar. In a second step, I discuss three central questions within the intersection between narrative micro- and macro-structures, namely (i) the definition of narrativity, (ii) the status of the narrator, and (iii) the relation between narration and fictionality. In sum, the article argues that investigations on the ‘grammar of narration’ do not just offer insights into a specific text configuration next to others, but are deeply linked to fundamental theoretical questions concerning the architecture of language – and that the comparison between linguistic and narratological categories offers a potential for addressing them.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a cognitive approach to fictionality and authorial intention using Text World Theory and Mind-Modeling is presented, which investigates two forms of ontological distortion: readers' misclassification of the novels' genre (as autofiction or autobiography) and the problem posed by the author's pseudonymic identity.
Abstract: Using Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels as case study, this article presents a cognitive approach to fictionality and authorial intention using Text World Theory and Mind-Modelling It investigates two forms of ontological distortion: readers’ (mis)classification of the novels’ genre (as autofiction or autobiography) and the problem posed by the author’s pseudonymic identity The analysis has three parts: first, I conduct a Text World analysis of the novels’ syntactic/stylistic similarities to autobiography and, in doing so, reveal its ontological structure; second, I consider the ontological liminality of narration and the ways in which readers build an authorial mind-model of Ferrante; thirdly, I explore the assessment of critics and/as readers of the text’s fictionality and the impact of Ferrante’s pseudonym on perceptions of authorial intentionality and the authorial mind-model Ultimately, I argue that a cognitive approach offers greatest insight into readers’ interpretations of authors and of fictionality

6 citations