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Journal ArticleDOI

Using technological modality to learn vocabulary incidentally and intentionally for effective communication

24 Jan 2020-International Journal of Intelligent Enterprise (Inderscience Publishers (IEL))-Vol. 7, pp 166
TL;DR: In this article, the role of language learners' acquisition in incidental and intentional vocabulary by using technological modality was highlighted by using TED talk videos with subtitles in the syllabus of task-based learning.
Abstract: Vocabulary is the flesh of a language, which is an indispensable constituent for a language. This research highlights the role of language learners' acquisition in incidental and intentional vocabulary by using technological modality. Effective usage of vocabulary in communication and comprehension is crucial and demanding as well. English being the diplomatic language, and which is witnessed as a parameter for graduates, particularly in job acquisition. There are numerous teaching methods were followed for effective learning. In order to benefit, English as a second language (ESL) learners and English as a foreign language (EFL) learners, task-based learning (TBL) approach is observed to be an effective learning method. This paper devices to use technology, entertainment, and design (TED) talk video with subtitles in the syllabus of TBL learning for effective learning of incidental and intentional vocabulary in language and succeeded by analysing the response from the students. The study reveals the significant development and interest in learning a new word by using the authentic instructional TED talk videos for vocabulary learning and vocabulary acquisition.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2022
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the importance of enhancing vocabulary through the Internet of Things (IoT) by learning English literature to 40 ESL learners (20 males and 20 females).
Abstract: The present study has explored the importance of enhancing vocabulary through the Internet of Things (IoT) by learning English literature to 40 ESL learners (20 males and 20 females). This research also said that the vocabulary level increases when learners are confident in their learning activities. To improve the confidence level of the ESL learners, their understanding of vocabulary knowledge should be improved. Understanding will improve when the learners have enough vocabulary to convey their ideas, so it becomes the teachers’ duty to improve their vocabulary. In order to ascertain the authenticities about ESL learners’ vocabulary knowledge through the Internet of Things (IoT) by learning literature, a semi-structured interview was also conducted with 10 participants who completed the questionnaire. The results exposed the subsequent array of responses like ‘able to learn vocabulary better when it was presented through the Internet of Things (IoT) activities’, ‘how significant is the Internet of Things (IoT) Technology in learning vocabulary’, and ‘Internet of Things (IoT) activities were useful in acquiring various kinds of knowledge and information about a particular word’ scored maximum number of participants. The syllabus also should have task-based exercises and activities to evaluate the students so that they may be able to enhance their vocabulary through the Internet of Things (IoT) in their studies.

1 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that incidental learning from context accounts for a substantial proportion of the vocabulary growth that occurs during the school years, and that children acquire knowledge about unfamiliar words while reading natural text.
Abstract: SCHOOL CHILDREN appear to increase their vocabularies by thousands of words per year. Many have hypothesized that a large proportion of this growth occurs through incidental learning from written context. However, experimental research has until now failed to provide unequivocal support of this hypothesis. The present study attempted to determine whether students do acquire measurable knowledge about unfamiliar words while reading natural text. Fifty-seven eighth-grade students of average and above average reading ability read either an expository or a narrative text about 1,000 words in length. After reading, subjects completed two vocabulary assessment tasks on 15 target words from each passage (thus serving as controls for the passage not read), an individual interview and a multiple-choice test, both designed to tap partial knowledge of word meanings. Results of within-subject, hierarchical regression analyses showed small but statistically reliable gains in word knowledge from context. Tentative extrapolations from the results and current estimates of the volume of children's reading lead us to believe that incidental learning from context accounts for a substantial proportion of the vocabulary growth that occurs during the school years.

1,106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of language learning strategy use by students at three different course levels at the University of Puerto Rico relates strategy use to gender as well as to L2 proficiency level and includes analysis of variation in the use of individual strategies on the SILL.
Abstract: This study builds on previous research using the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL). Most previous SILL research has made comparisons across the entire survey or in terms of strategy categories and has stressed proficiency level at the expense of other variables. The present largescale (N = 374) study of language learning strategy use by students at three different course levels at the University of Puerto Rico relates strategy use to gender as well as to L2 proficiency level and includes analysis of variation in the use of individual strategies on the SILL. Like previous researchers, we found greater use of learning strategies among more successful learners and higher levels of strategy use by women than by men. Our analysis, however, revealed more complex patterns of use than have appeared in previous studies. With both proficiency level and gender, only some items showed significant variation, and significant variation by proficiency level did not invariably mean more frequent strategy use by more successful students. The strategies reported as used more often by the more successful students emphasized active, naturalistic practice and were used in combination with a variety of what we term bedrock strategies, which were used frequently or moderately frequently by learners at all levels. The study's generalizability and its implications for teachers and researchers are discussed.

1,083 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the relationship of individual difference variables to end-of-training proficiency ratings in speaking and reading for a large sample of adults in intensive training in a wide range of languages at the U.S. Department of State.
Abstract: This article examines the relationships of a variety of individual difference variables to end-of-training proficiency ratings in speaking and reading for a large sample of adults in intensive training in a wide range of languages at the U.S. Department of State. Variables included tested cognitive aptitude, learning strategies, learning styles, personality, motivation, and anxiety. Although tested cognitive aptitude showed the strongest correlations with proficiency test results in both skills, the other variables also correlated in ways that show how rich and complex the individual learner's role in language is. Results may contribute to increasingly sophisticated student counseling and to efforts to enhance student autonomy by tailoring treatments to student characteristics. They also increase knowledge of attributes that may affect language training to the upper proficiency levels.

593 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 1996
TL;DR: The classroom experiments reported here attempt to do this, using instructional procedures designed to increase the salience and cognitive processing of targeted words encountered by L2 students in reading texts using a recently developed instrument, the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale.
Abstract: Introduction The long-neglected issue of vocabulary acquisition is currently receiving attention in second language pedagogy and research – reflecting the importance always accorded it by learners. But it is still far from clear how learners acquire vocabulary or how it can best be taught. Reading comprehension processes may offer some clues. There is considerable evidence from first language studies that extensive reading for meaning leads to vocabulary acquisition over time, and indeed that reading probably accounts for most L1 vocabulary expansion beyond the first few thousand words in common oral usage. Second language research on this issue is sparse, but what there is indicates that extensive reading programs are generally more effective than systematic vocabulary instruction using decontextualized exercises (see, for example, Elley and Mangubhai, 1983; Krashen, 1989). The process by which “incidental” acquisition through reading occurs is slow, however, and there is no way to predict which words will be learned, when, nor to what degree. The question remains as to whether instructional intervention could support the process and make it more directed and efficient. The classroom experiments reported here attempt to do this, using instructional procedures designed to increase the salience and cognitive processing of targeted words encountered by L2 students in reading texts. These experiments track the acquisition of these words using a recently developed instrument, the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (Paribakht & Wesche, 1993; Wesche & Paribakht, forthcoming).

491 citations

Book ChapterDOI
11 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website as mentioned in this paper, in case of legitimate complaints the material will be removed.
Abstract: Disclaimer/Complaints regulations If you believe that digital publication of certain material infringes any of your rights or (privacy) interests, please let the Library know, stating your reasons. In case of a legitimate complaint, the Library will make the material inaccessible and/or remove it from the website. Please Ask the Library: http://uba.uva.nl/en/contact, or a letter to: Library of the University of Amsterdam, Secretariat, Singel 425, 1012 WP Amsterdam, The Netherlands. You will be contacted as soon as possible.

450 citations