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DissertationDOI

Vice in a vicious society : crime and the community in mid-nineteenth century New South Wales

01 Jan 1980-
TL;DR: The authors argue that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated and that crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability.
Abstract: As a receptacle for British convicts, New South Wales was popularly portrayed as a 'vicious' society. Crime and vice were considered the inevitable concomitants of a transported 'criminal class' and convict 'contamination'. The following study, focussing on the mid-nineteenth century, argues that the impact of convictism on colonial crime and mores was greatly exaggerated. Official criminal statistics, reportage in the press, as well as other contemporary evidence, all present in some ways a distorted view of crime. Crime was not simply grafted on to the colony, but reflected various concerns and interests, the conditions of a relatively affluent frontier community, and perhaps most importantly, an intense concern with respectability. The community's transformation from a penal colony was marked not only by a decreasing proportion of convicts in the population, but a reorientation in standards of public conduct, new fears concerning public order, and an obsessional interest in repudiating the convict stain.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1966 paperback edition of a publication which first appeared in 1963 has by now been widely reviewed as a worthy contribution to the sociological study of deviant behavior as discussed by the authors, and the authors developed a sequential model of deviance relying on the concept of career, a concept originally developed in studies of occupations.
Abstract: This 1966 paperback edition of a publication which first appeared in 1963 has by now been widely reviewed as a worthy contribution to the sociological study of deviant behavior. Its current appearance as a paperback is a testimonial both to the quality of the work and to the prominence of deviant behavior in this generation. In general the author places deviance in perspective, identifies types of deviant behavior, considers the role of rule makers and enforcers, and some of the problems in studying deviance. In addition, he develops a sequential model of deviance relying on the concept of career, a concept originally developed in studies of occupations. In his study of a particular kind of deviance, the use of marihuana, the author posits and tests systematically an hypothesis about the genesis of marihuana use for pleasure. The hypothesis traces the sequence of changes in individual attitude

2,650 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A New Britannia as discussed by the authors is essentially a history of the Labor Movement, but with a difference: it is not Humphrey M cQueen's prim ary intention to argue the significance of the strikes of the 1890s; to date with accuracy L abor's intention to enter politics; or to dissect the m ore notorious strikes.
Abstract: ONE O F TH E ASSUM PTIONS pervading the study of Australian history is that the working class and their political correlate the Labor Party were the bearers of what is distinctively Australian. It is perhaps for this reason the history of the Labor Movement is a favorite field of study for A ustralian historians. A New Britannia is essentially a history of the Labor M ovement — but with a difference. It is not Hum phrey M cQueen’s prim ary intention to argue the significance of the strikes of the 1890’s; to date with accuracy L abor’s intention to enter politics; or to dissect the m ore notorious strikes of the twentieth century. M cQueen refers to these other peaks in the history of the L abor M ovement and sometimes records a deviant interpretation. But the central impulse of the book is to locate the Labor M ovement in the m aterialistic, acquisitive perspectives of A ustralian society as a whole.

17 citations

References
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 1967

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The praise given by scholarly reviewers to David Philips' Crime and Authority in Victorian England greatly puzzled me as mentioned in this paper, and it is hard to see how they could have reconciled their praise with their criticisms.
Abstract: The praise given by scholarly reviewers to David Philips' Crime and Authority in Victorian England1 greatly puzzled me. At least two of these reviewers pointed to serious weaknesses in the book, and it is hard to see how they could have reconciled their praise with their criticisms. Even allowing for a 'protective' style of reviewing, perhaps peculiar to historians,2 the contradictions seemed glaringly obvious. In the Times Literary Supplement of 19 April 1978 (p. 557) David Jones wrote in his opening paragraph, 'This is an important work, one of the very few pioneering studies on Victorian society that have appeared in recent years. Both the scholarship and technical expertise in this book reveal David Philips as a historian of exceptional talent'. Later, the same reviewer said that Philips' 'conclusions are by any standards significant and provocative'. Yet Jones suggested that Philips was not aware of the significance of his failure to deal with offences other than indictable ones, that he ignored the importance of the political setting of the period and lacked depth in his treatment of industrial society and of the 'normalisation' of crime, and that he failed to include an adequate discussion of the magistracy on the grounds that he had already published an article on that topic. Similarly, Barbara Weinberger began her review in the Bulletin of the Society for the Study of Labour History (No. 36, 1978, p. 61) by reference to 'this very lucid and useful study', which, she later asserted, 'will undoubtedly become the standard reference for research in this field'. Yet she also criticised the failure to deal adequately with the magistracy, and?after praising the section on industrial theft?said

2 citations