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Volleys of Humanity: Reaching the Point of Wheat, or A Portrait of the Artist as a Maturing Woman

About: The article was published on 2011-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 2 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Humanity & Portrait.
Citations
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01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors of Agua viva and Un soplo de vida describe the causes and effects of the writing process in order to know it, to govern it.
Abstract: How does one state in words the impossibility of writing? How does one translate an author who has depicted herself as silent in the very text? The Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector dares to do so. From Agua viva, one of her first novels, to Un soplo de vida, her posthumous work, Lispector enters into an egotistic self-referential movement. She dares to speak from her work, from herself, from art, and from literature, thus mixing realities of different dimensions and erasing borders between life and letter. In Agua viva Lispector interrogates the causes and effects of the writing process in order to know it, to govern it. There, she begins to experience revelatory and joyful epiphanies that later, in Un soplo de vida, become mystical. However, the tone of this later text is quite different. There, her writing presages a forthcoming silence, and because of that the illusion of apprehending knowledge by language fades as it becomes certain of the impossible... This working paper is available in Working Papers in Romance Languages: http://repository.upenn.edu/wproml/vol1/iss1/5 On Joy, Death, and Writing: From Autobiography to Autothanatography in Clarice Lispector’s Works

2 citations

02 May 2018
TL;DR: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) as discussed by the authors is a semi-autobiographical account of a young man's efforts to realize his artistic potential, where the interactions and disconnect between the novel's narrative perspectives, specifically free indirect discourse and first-person narration, provide different and oftentimes contradictory information about the protagonist, Stephen Dedalus, and his developing sense of identity.
Abstract: James Joyce is noteworthy for his ability to elucidate different registers of consciousness through his characters. In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916), Joyce does so through his semiautobiographical recounting of a young man’s efforts to realize his artistic potential. The interactions and disconnect between the novel’s narrative perspectives, specifically free indirect discourse and first-person narration, provide different, and oftentimes contradictory, information about the protagonist, Stephen Dedalus, and his developing sense of identity. While he receives, and in some ways accepts, a socially imposed male identity, glimpses into his occluded unconscious thoughts reveal his more natural inclinations toward female identification. The unconscious manifestations of socially gendered behaviors and thought patterns demonstrate the necessary fluidity of gender identity, as their presence renders the ability to consistently perform one end of the gender spectrum over another infeasible. This reality is grounded in the novel’s shift to first-person perspective at its conclusion, in which Stephen undergoes a partial, but inconsequential, reckoning with his conception of masculine performance. By illustrating how humans experience different registers of consciousness, A Portrait incites its readers to reevaluate their personal understandings of gender development and performance, while delegitimizing gender binaries as socially constructed fallacies.

1 citations

References
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: This paper examined the ways in which the critical structure of modern Irish Bildungsroman deconstructs and re-examines "residues of past trauma" in the form of socio-cultural, psychological, personal and notably political artefacts present in the modern Irish society.
Abstract: My thesis examines the ways in which the critical structure of modern Irish Bildungsroman deconstructs and re-examines ‘residues of past trauma’ in the form of socio-cultural, psychological, personal and notably political artefacts present in the nation’s unfortunate engagement with the State’s politics of formation. The result is a resistant and radical form which challenges the classical and modern specificity of the genre by introducing a non-conformist, post-Joycean protagonist, whose antithetical perception of history and socio-cultural norms contradicts the conservative efforts of the post-independence Irish State. To examine such a resistant critical structure, this thesis focuses on Roddy Doyle’s A Star Called Henry (1999), Dermot Bolger’s The Woman’s Daughter (1987), William Trevor’s The Story of Lucy Gault (2002), Seamus Deane’s Reading In The Dark (1996), Patrick McCabe’s The Butcher Boy (1992), Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes (1996), Edna O’Brien’s The Country Girls (1960) and A Pagan Place (1970), Nuala O’Faolain’s Are You Somebody? (1996), Francis Stuart’s Black List, Section H (1971), Flann O’Brien’s The Hard Life (1961), and John McGahern’s The Dark (1965). The selected novels provide an invaluable insight into the nation’s perception of sensitive concepts such as modernism and modern Irish identity, and how the confluence of these two produced a critical dialectical discourse which chronicles the formation of a non-conformist, ahistorical modern protagonist. To achieve a historical relevance, this thesis starts by examining Doyle’s fictionalization of 1916 Easter Rising and the chaotic 1920s; Bolger’s exploration of a repressive, inward-looking post-independence Irish society in the 1930s and the 1940s; Trevor’s engagement with a socio-political divide that further split the nation; Deane’s autogenous reading of an internal neocolonial ‘Othering’ during the ‘emergency’; McCabe’s illustration of the State’s architecture of oppression, and societal introversion from the early 1940s to the 1960s; Edna O’Brien’s and Nuala O’Faolain’s exemplary illustration of women’s blighted sexual Bildung in the 1940s, 50s and 60s; and finally examining a radical, ‘chronocentric’ depiction of a socio-political divide fictionalized by Stuart and McGahern, which emerged during the early days of the State and continued to dominate the nation well into the 1960s and the early 1970s. By examining psycho-social, sexual and political traumata reflected in the modern Irish Bildungsroman, this thesis provides a dialectical reading of the gap that appeared between the revolutionary ethos of independent Irish identity formation, rooted in the principles of 1916 Rising and the 1920s, and that which appeared in the form of a tolerant republicanism in the 1980s. To study this socio-historical gap, I examine the nation’s criticism of the State’s politics and structure of formation, manifested in narratives of individual and national formation. The modern Irish Bildungsroman, I argue, appropriates the traditional features of the genre, for instance, chronicling the individual’s psychosocial formation and the potential to re-engage with their society, and produces a critical matrix for a dialectical discourse which enables the nation to voice their concerns vis-a-vis a politically dichotomous post-independence Irish society, a repressed history, and at the same time to externalize their perception of modern Irish formation, being founded on an anti-colonial, non-conservative and politically aware consciousness. The result, which I call the ‘Meta-National Narrative of Formation,’ is a historically resistant and socio-politically conscious narrative which finds independence in rejection, imposition, and deformation, namely, by defying the State’s architecture of formation as well as their nativist, retrograde visions of Irish identity.

18 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The authors explored the relationship between post-dramatic theatre and ecriture feminine using a practice-as-research methodology and found that postdramastic theatre has the potential to be -and thus frequently is -feminine.
Abstract: This thesis explores the relationship between postdramatic theatre and ecriture feminine using a practice-as-research methodology. Its claim is that Helene Cixous’s ecriture feminine is revitalised as a source for feminist theatre studies through the emergence of postdramatic theatre. The project’s practice-led research identified and extracted principles from Cixous’s prose writing that are especially compelling for theatre and explored these through laboratory practice. The primary sources for doing this were Cixous’s novels Inside (1969) and The Book of Promethea (1983), as well as her writing on Clarice Lispector. The exploration of these materials was a creative and transformative activity that identified equivalent strategies between the two media – prose writing and theatre – while at the same time revealing significant differences and tensions. The practice is documented in the thesis via research logs and video evidence. The written reflection draws attention to the specific potentialities that theatre brings to ecriture feminine and discusses how the outcomes of the practice-led research resonate with postdramatic aesthetics. While the research findings accumulated strategically across the series of three performances, and the performances built upon each other iteratively, each of the findings chapters focuses in detail on one aspect of the practice: specifically, semiotics, dramaturgy and feminine epistemology. By pinpointing and discussing nodal points at which postdramatic practices and ecriture feminine intersect, this thesis aims to show that postdramatic theatre has the potential to be – and thus frequently is – feminine. Indeed, the overall aim of this thesis is to advance the emerging field of study of feminism in postdramatic theatre by exploring the feminine potential of postdramatic theatre and proposing that Cixous’s ecriture feminine offers a way of framing the poetics of postdramatic theatre in relation to feminist politics. The findings have potential utility for theatre-makers seeking a feminist method in the postdramatic as well as scholars of postdramatic theatre and feminism.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Oct 2008-Angelaki
TL;DR: The relationship between friendship and theory is neither accidental nor essential as discussed by the authors, but it can be seen as an attempt to break with the seduction of friendship and, in so doing, establish a properly philosophical/theoretical friend to whom we would no longer be attached or attracted in an unthinking manner.
Abstract: The relationship between friendship and theory is neither accidental nor essential. In many ways we might define theory as an attempt to break with the seduction of friendship and, in so doing, establish a properly philosophical/theoretical friend to whom we would no longer be attached or attracted in an unthinking manner. This philosophical friend would be properly recognised as having an existence beyond the seductive lure of like-mindedness and beyond the banal relations of need, mirroring, agreement and common sense. We might say, then, that there are two modes of friendship: an everyday unthinking bond that occurs in an almost animalistic fashion, and a friendship that has gone through agonistics. We could also argue that the creation of theory occurs through a break with the seduction of the immediate friend, who is also sexual and sexed. That is, on the one hand there is the society of brothers as men bonded through a polity made up of familial units, excluding women and slaves and recognising each other as men in so far as they are liberated from the labours and captivations of the oikos. On the other, there is the properly philosophical friend, one who is encountered through the masterly abandonment of dependence on the other’s recognition, of the polity’s structure of male bonding and who – in a sublime release from normativity – can bear an approach from the other that is not determined in advance by relations of propriety or property. This second form of friend has been intimated in a number of key twentieth-century philosophical texts. In The Politics of Friendship Jacques Derrida (1997) tries to imagine a hospitality and community without a grounding in fraternity; in A Thousand Plateaus Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (1987) imagine a ‘‘war machine’’ that might open a politics beyond any tribal bonding of man as an organism; in various celebrations of art, terror and cruelty thinkers such as Georges Bataille, Maurice Blanchot, Antonin Artaud and Michel Foucault have tried to imagine a non-Hegelian form of ‘‘relation without relation,’’ where the self is liberated from its definition through an other (liberated from mastery) and can therefore approach others as other. Foucault imagines an ethics of the body and its pleasures, a care of the self, rather than a regime of normalisation grounded on a bio-political conception of human life (Foucault). In so doing he, like Deleuze and Derrida, draws upon Bataille’s and Blanchot’s criticisms of Hegelian notions of rationality, where all relations to otherness serve claire colebrook

8 citations