scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book ChapterDOI

Water footprint management in the fashion supply chain: A review of emerging trends and research challenges

TL;DR: In this article, the authors present all conceptual components and unique characteristics of sustainable fashion supply chains and then provide an up-to-date review of water footprint assessment and management in the textile industry.
Abstract: The fashion industry is one of most water-dependent production sectors. The cultivation of cotton, which is used in 40% of all clothing produced globally, is the most water-consuming stage across apparel supply chains, further considering that several cotton farming regions face water scarcity. The textile industry uses a significant volume of freshwater throughout all processing operations (e.g., dyeing, bleaching, washing), while it contributes to freshwater pollution during the thorough washing of the fabrics to remove chemicals. From an end-to-end supply chain perspective, the impact of consumers in terms of water consumption and pollution due to laundry and detergent use cannot be neglected. In this chapter, we first present all conceptual components and unique characteristics of sustainable fashion supply chains and then provide an up-to-date review of water footprint assessment and management in the textile industry. Our work aims at advancing the research field of water-friendly fashion supply chains by identifying: (1) emerging trends in the clothing industry and their impact on freshwater resources, and (2) research challenges and opportunities for water footprint management across apparel supply chains. We anticipate that this research could act as a roadmap for decision makers in the textile and fashion industries to develop state-of-the-art strategies for water-efficient clothing products.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors draw on existing studies to estimate the potential scale of applicability and potential economic and environmental benefits of these technologies, and then estimate their potential environmental and environmental impacts.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a text mining technique was employed to identify the sustainable practices developed by the textile and apparel industry and investigate the gaps and opportunities in the sustainability implementation process by quantitively analyzing the sustainability topics and the relevant topic trends.
Abstract: PurposeThe purpose of this study is to (1) identify the sustainable practices developed by the textile and apparel industry and (2) investigate the gaps and opportunities in the sustainability implementation process by quantitively analyzing the sustainability topics and the relevant topic trends.Design/methodology/approachThis study employed text mining techniques. A total of 1,168 relevant magazine articles published from 2013 to 2020 were collected and then categorized according to their tones. In total, 36 topics were identified by reviewing the sustainability issues in the industry. The frequency of each topic mentioned in the articles and the correlation coefficients between topics' frequencies and published time were calculated. The results were used to examine if the three sustainability dimensions (environment, society, economy) were equally addressed and identify opportunities in the sustainability implementation process.FindingsThere were much fewer social and economic topics than environmental topics discussed in the articles. Additionally, there were not enough practices developed to reduce microfiber pollution, improve consumers' knowledge of sustainability, offset the carbon footprint, build a transparent, sustainable supply chain and avoid animal cruelty.Originality/valueThere is a lack of research focusing on the whole supply chain and sustainability when investigating sustainable practices and topic trends. This study fills a part of the gap. The results can be used by industrialists to identify sustainable practice opportunities and better manage their sustainable supply chains. Researchers can utilize the results to compare the topics in the industry with the topics studied in academia.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors employed a multi-phase research methodology to benchmark the sustainable sourcing implementation barriers in the apparel and fashion-luxury sector and identified 20 key sustainable sourcing barriers for the global apparel and lifestyle sector.

10 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a case study of the textile industry and comprehends the internal water usage information such as the entire plant's water balance, detail of water usage, water yield for water conservation, and recycling measures.
Abstract: The concept of water footprint (WF) is an important breakthrough in the evolution of methodologies, approaches, and indicators for measuring freshwater appropriation and assessing the wastewater discharge. Industries have become increasingly aware that they contribute directly and indirectly to water scarcity and pollution, and this constitutes a risk that they have to respond to. Industrial water footprint (IWF) methodology, which concentrates on the industrial production stages, can present a clear graphical view of freshwater consumption and impacts caused by wastewater discharge at both product and environment level. Most of the case studies reported have shown that Industrial Water Footprints (IWF) were caused by grey industrial water footprints. The grey water footprint refers to the volume of freshwater that is required to dilute the toxic pollutant concentration to meet the existing water quality standards. The present study reviews the case study of the textile industry and comprehends the internal water usage information such as the entire plant's water balance, detail of water usage, water yield for water conservation, and recycling measures. Considering a textile and dyeing plant as an example, the water footprints before and after a cleaner production audit were calculated.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a literature review was performed to identify candidate survey items whose content was later validated with experts in terms of their relevance, clarity, and essentiality to measure WF management.
Abstract: Common problems when carrying out water footprint (WF) assessments are obtaining specific primary data, dealing with the complexity of its computation, and the availability of quality data. In a supply chain context, inconsistencies are even more exacerbated. In order to fill in this research gap, this study proposes and evaluates the content validity of a survey scale to assess WF management initiatives implemented by companies, with a focus on supply chains and the agriculture industry. In order to do so, a literature review was performed to identify candidate survey items whose content was later validated with experts in terms of their relevance, clarity, and essentiality to measure WF management. Content validity was assessed using several indices (items’ content validity index (I-CVI), Kappa’s coefficient, Aiken’ V coefficient, and content validity ratio (CVR)), which indicated high content validity for the selected items. This study provides a set of measurement survey items that can be used to evaluate WF management initiatives implemented in agri-food supply chains in future empirical studies.

1 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of the most widely used and, according to many researchers, the most promising textile wastewaters decoloration methods is presented in this paper, where data on decolloration rates of different dye classes, obtained by means of different methods is gathered.

957 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors assess the water footprint of worldwide cotton consumption, identifying both the location and the character of the impacts of cotton consumption on the water resources in the countries where cotton is grown and processed.

680 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a revised water footprint calculation method, incorporating water stress characterisation factors, is presented and demonstrated for two case study products, Dolmio ® pasta sauce and Peanut M&M's ® using primary production data.
Abstract: Through the interconnectedness of global business, the local consumption of products and services is intervening in the hydrological cycle throughout the world to an unprecedented extent. In order to address the unsustainable use of global freshwater resources, indicators are needed which make the impacts of production systems and consumption patterns transparent. In this paper, a revised water footprint calculation method, incorporating water stress characterisation factors, is presented and demonstrated for two case study products, Dolmio ® pasta sauce and Peanut M&M's ® using primary production data. The method offers a simple, yet meaningful way of making quantitative comparisons between products, production systems and services in terms of their potential to contribute to water scarcity. As such, capacity is created for change through public policy as well as corporate and individual action. This revised method represents an alternative to existing volumetric water footprint calculation methods which combine green and blue water consumption from water scarce and water abundant regions such that they give no clear indication about where the actual potential for harm exists.

563 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors carried out a study with stakeholders of the fashion industry and reported on their views on the challenges and conflicts of the different dimensions of sustainability, and discussed how to leverage both the internal and external organizations in the European supply chain.

552 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the results of exploratory case-based research aimed at identifying three factors: the drivers that push companies to adopt “green” practices, the different practices that can be used to improve environmental sustainability, and the environmental KPIs measured by fashion companies.

459 citations

Trending Questions (1)
What are the main water impacts of the fashion industry?

The main water impacts of the fashion industry include the use of water in cotton cultivation, water consumption and pollution during textile processing operations, and water consumption and pollution by consumers during laundry and detergent use.