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Book ChapterDOI

We Are a Long Ways Past Maus: Responsible and Irresponsible Holocaust Representations in Graphic Comics and Sitcom Cartoons

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TLDR
The authors examined the messaging, delivery, and visible impact of pop cultural icons on the ways people remember and forget the Holocaust and found that contemporary Holocaust-themed animation on sitcoms like Family Guy and South Park sometimes poke "irresponsible" fun.
Abstract
In 1986, cartoonist Art Spiegelman published Maus: A Survivor’s Tale, the first book in his two-volume graphic comic novel about the Holocaust. He established, perhaps unwittingly, a new genre of Holocaust representation, i.e., comic animation that thrives in current times. While his intervention was “responsible” in the sense that it spurred, rather than spurned reverent remembrance, contemporary Holocaust-themed animation on sitcoms like Family Guy and South Park sometimes poke “irresponsible” fun. American cultural producers have a long tradition of ridiculing Adolf Hitler and Nazism. Joking about the Holocaust and its survivors, however, is something new. This chapter does not consider the question of whether or not this sort of humor is amusing, or appropriate. Rather, this study examines the messaging, delivery, and visible impact of such pop cultural icons on the ways people remember and forget the Holocaust.

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Book Review: Tourism and Memory: Visitor Experiences of the Nazi and GDR Past

TL;DR: Sastre Díaz C et al. as mentioned in this paper investigated the limits of acceptable memory discourse in post-conflict Peru, focusing on the 1986 prison massacres, and the testimony of space: sites of memory and violence.
Journal ArticleDOI

"The Dark Path Back": Investigating Holocaust Memory in Sara Paretsky's Novel Total Recall

TL;DR: A close reading of Sara Paretsky's 2001 novel Total Recall demonstrates that the ongoing quest for social justice by her woman detective, V.I. Warshawski, is addressed through assertive women's voices that have also transformed critical approaches to women's crime fiction as mentioned in this paper .
References
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Journal Article

The Holocaust in American Life

TL;DR: Novick as discussed by the authors argues that the Holocaust became more ubiquitous in American cultural and political life after 1968 than it had been in the postwar years, rejecting psychoanalytically informed accounts that explain this lag in terms of "trauma" or "repression."
Book

Prosthetic Memory: The Transformation of American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture

TL;DR: The Prosthetic Imagination: Immigration Narratives and the 'Melting Down' of Difference as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the history of memory, modernity, and mass culture.
Journal ArticleDOI

The Americanization of the holocaust

TL;DR: The Americanization of the Holocaust as discussed by the authors presents a collection of essays on America's cultural appropriation of this central event in twentieth-century history, from Schindler's List to Elie Wiesel's throwing out the first pitch at the Mets season opener in 1988.