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Journal ArticleDOI

Weave coding into K-5 curricula as new literacies

06 Dec 2019-Vol. 48, Iss: 2, pp 49-66
TL;DR: In this article, a table of low-cost Web 2.0 tools was presented with sample lesson ideas, along with some literacy lesson ideas to help teacher educators and pre-service teachers begin to integrate coding into the K-5 literacy curricula.
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to posit that coding should be considered as a critical part of new literacies. Teacher educators should first adopt the new literacies perspective, and then prepare pre-service teachers to teach both traditional literacy and new literacies skills, especially preparing them how to weave coding into K-5 literacy curricula to cultivate younger learners’ new ways of expressions and computational thinking skills. To facilitate this educational transformation, low-cost Web 2.0 tools and apps were introduced as one practical approach, along with some literacy lesson ideas to help teacher educators and pre-service teachers begin to integrate coding into the K-5 literacy curricula.,This paper is a viewpoint paper.,A table of low-cost Web 2.0 tools was presented with sample lesson ideas.,More than ever, coding breaks the traditional definition of literacy as paper-based reading and writing. It empowers students to read, write and create with multimodality on multiple platforms. Weaving coding into the literacy curricula offers the window to promote both computational thinking and new literacies skills. Teacher educators, among all other stakeholders, should begin the efforts to prepare pre-service teachers to weave coding into the literacy curricula and other content areas in the teacher educations programs now.
Citations
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15 May 2015
TL;DR: In this article, a universally applicable attitude and skill set for computer science is presented, which is a set of skills and attitudes that everyone would be eager to learn and use, not just computer scientists.
Abstract: It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use.

430 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a literature review on how coding apps affect young children's literacy skills is presented, concluding that ScratchJr seems to be the most useful app for developing children's skills.
Abstract: Data that shows that young age children can learn and acquire CT and coding skills has led governments and policymakers internationally to integrate CT into the curriculum, starting in the earliest grades. Apps offering various programming lessons, puzzles, and challenges to teach core coding concepts to children have gained increased popularity in recent years. Coupled with the media and government's rhetoric and an increasing number of coding apps, educators have been responsible for introducing young children to coding using touchscreen technology. Nevertheless, few apps have been evaluated for their effectiveness, so we know little about what children can learn from them. Further research is required to determine whether the available coding apps are developmentally appropriate, appealing, and meaningful for young children, helping them develop CT, coding, and general skills. This article presents a literature review on how coding apps affect young children's CT, coding, and general literacy skills. The literature review includes 21 studies that examined four different apps. The main conclusion is that all apps positively affect the development of children's CT and coding skills. However, ScratchJr seems to be the most useful app.

43 citations

17 Mar 2014

1 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a universally applicable attitude and skill set for computer science is presented, which is a set of skills and attitudes that everyone would be eager to learn and use, not just computer scientists.
Abstract: It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use.

4,819 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current state of discourse on computational thinking in K-12 education by examining mostly recently published academic literature that uses Wing's article as a springboard, identifies gaps in research, and articulates priorities for future inquiries as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Jeannette Wing’s influential article on computational thinking 6 years ago argued for adding this new competency to every child’s analytical ability as a vital ingredient of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning. What is computational thinking? Why did this article resonate with so many and serve as a rallying cry for educators, education researchers, and policy makers? How have they interpreted Wing’s definition, and what advances have been made since Wing’s article was published? This article frames the current state of discourse on computational thinking in K–12 education by examining mostly recently published academic literature that uses Wing’s article as a springboard, identifies gaps in research, and articulates priorities for future inquiries.

1,445 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors identified the top 10 soft skills as perceived the most important by business executives: integrity, communication, courtesy, responsibility, social skills, positive attitude, professionalism, flexibility, teamwork, and work ethic.
Abstract: Hard skills are the technical expertise and knowledge needed for a job. Soft skills are interpersonal qualities, also known as people skills, and personal attributes that one possesses. Business executives consider soft skills a very important attribute in job applicants. Employers want new employees to have strong soft skills, as well as hard skills. This study identified the top 10 soft skills as perceived the most important by business executives: integrity, communication, courtesy, responsibility, social skills, positive attitude, professionalism, flexibility, teamwork, and work ethic.

946 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current trends of empirical research in the development of computational thinking through programming is presented and a constructionism-based problem-solving learning environment could be designed to foster computational practices and computational perspectives and suggests possible research and instructional implications.

852 citations

Trending Questions (1)
Can coding be the new literacy in the 21st century?

Coding should be considered as a critical part of new literacies, as it empowers students to read, write, and create with multimodality on multiple platforms. Weaving coding into the literacy curricula promotes computational thinking and new literacies skills.