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Journal ArticleDOI

What Makes Things Cheesy?: Satire, Multinationalism, and B-Movies

01 Jun 2000-Social Text (Duke University Press)-Vol. 18, Iss: 2, pp 59-82
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyse a type of films comiques americains which s'inscrit dans une perspective resolument parodique (cheesy) and qualifie un processus de valorisation de l'artificiel, de lexageration, du sauvage ou de lobscene.
Abstract: L'A. analyse l'avenement d'un nouveau type de films comiques americains qui s'inscrit dans une perspective resolument parodique (cheesy). Il souligne que le terme «cheese» designe a la fois une pratique parodique et une lecture parodique d'une oeuvre, et qualifie un processus de valorisation de l'artificiel, de l'exageration, du sauvage ou de l'obscene. Il souligne que «Brady Bunch Movie» qui evoque, dans un style parodique, la vie quotidienne des afro-americains, s'inscrit dans cette perspective tout comme les films d'horreur mexicains ou les films de Quentin Tarentino. Il montre que ce dernier met en scene des heros aux identites raciales interchangeables et qu'il s'efforce de parodier les scenes d'action des films de John Woo. L'A. rappelle que le monstre Godzilla fut cree par Inoshiro Honda pour denoncer le danger inherent au developpement de l'arme atomique. Il insiste sur le fait que le manque de moyens financiers et l'utilisation de maquettes destinee a pallier cette carence rend l'atmosphere des scenes de bataille particulierement comique
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a more inclusive and informative book than previous books on the subject, which they call "far more informative and informative than previous works on the topic".
Abstract: \"Far more inclusive and informative than previous books on the subject\". -- The New York Times

513 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Andrew Ross as discussed by the authors argues that the making of "taste" is hardly an aesthetic activity, but rather an exercise in cultural power, policing and carefully redefining social relations between classes.
Abstract: The intellectual and the popular: Irving Howe and John Waters, Susan Sontag and Ethel Rosenberg, Dwight MacDonald and Bill Cosby, Amiri Baraka and Mick Jagger, Andrea Dworkin and Grace Jones, Andy Warhol and Lenny Bruce. All feature in Andrew Ross's lively history and critique of modern American culture. Andrew Ross examines how and why the cultural authority of modern intellectuals is bound up with the changing face of popular taste in America. He argues that the making of \"taste\" is hardly an aesthetic activity, but rather an exercise in cultural power, policing and carefully redefining social relations between classes.

374 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors locate the sport of skateboarding within the larger historical context of white male rebellion found in Jack Kerouac?s On the Road and Norman Mailer?s White Negro (1957).
Abstract: Alternative sports have been situated within backlash politics whereby subcultural or marginal representations illustrate a victimized white male. While this may be true of some sports, skateboard media fosters a sustained critique of ?whiteness.? To understand the representation of white resistance in skateboarding, we must locate the sport within the larger historical context of white male rebellion found in Jack Kerouac?s On the Road (1957) and Norman Mailer?s White Negro (1957). Similar to these countercultural narratives, skateboard media represents a tension between a death of whiteness (symbolized by co-opting ?blackness?) and its inevitable rebirth (through prolific marketing of white skaters). Unlike the Beats, however, the dialectics of white resistance appear in skateboard media through advertisements that are often underscored by parody, which produces its own set of complexities.

40 citations

21 Jun 2019
TL;DR: Noble et al. as mentioned in this paper explored the ways in which discourses of Silicon Valley technocratic elites bolster investments in post-racialism as a pretext for re-consolidations of capital, in opposition to public policy commitments to end discriminatory labor practices.
Abstract: Author(s): Noble, Safiya; Roberts, Sarah | Editor(s): Mukherjee, Roopali; Banet-Weiser, Sarah; Gray, Herman | Abstract: Among modern digital technology elites, myths of meritocracy and intellectual prowess are used as racial and gender markers of white male supremacy that disproportionately consolidate resources away from people of color, particularly African Americans, Latino/as and Native Americans. Investments in meritocratic myths suppress interrogations of racism and discrimination even as the products of digital elites are infused with racial, class, and gender markers. Longstanding struggles for social, political, and economic inclusion for African Americans, women, and other legally protected classes have been predicated upon the recognition of systemic exclusion, forced labor, and structural disenfranchisement, and commitments to US public policies like affirmative action have, likewise, been fundamental to political reforms geared to economic opportunity and participation. The rise of the digital technocracy has, in many ways, been antithetical to these sustained efforts to recognize race and gender as salient factors structuring technocratic opportunity and inclusion. This chapter explores some of the ways in which discourses of Silicon Valley technocratic elites bolster investments in post-racialism as a pretext for re-consolidations of capital, in opposition to public policy commitments to end discriminatory labor practices. Through a careful analysis of the rise of digital technology companies, and a discussion of how technology elites work to mask everything from algorithmic to genetic inscriptions of race embedded in their products, we show how digital elites elide responsibility for their post-racial re-inscriptions of racial visibilities (and invisibilities). Using historical and critical discourse analysis, the chapter reveals how myths of a digital meritocracy premised on a technocratic colorblindness emerge key to perpetuating gender and racial exclusions.

21 citations

Book ChapterDOI
26 Sep 2007

17 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1905
Abstract: While in this book Freud tells some good stories with his customary verve and economy, its point is wholly serious

2,068 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: The authors traces the tattered history of Irish and African-American relations, revealing how the Irish used labor unions, the Catholic Church and the Democratic party to succeed in American, and draws a powerful connection between the embracing of white supremacy and Irish success in 19th century American society.
Abstract: Ignatiev traces the tattered history of Irish and African-American relations, revealing how the Irish used labor unions, the Catholic Church and the Democratic party to succeed in American. He uncovers the roots of conflict between Irish-Americans and African-Americans and draws a powerful connection between the embracing of white supremacy and Irish "success" in 19th century American society.

1,601 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a more inclusive and informative book than previous books on the subject, which they call "far more informative and informative than previous works on the topic".
Abstract: \"Far more inclusive and informative than previous books on the subject\". -- The New York Times

513 citations