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When the Body Becomes All Eyes: Paradigms, Discourses and Practices of Power in Kalarippayattu, a South Indian Martial Art

01 Jan 1998-
TL;DR: A study of kalarippayattu, one of India's traditional martial and medical arts dating from at least the 12th century AD, is presented in this paper.
Abstract: This is a study of kalarippayattu, one of India's traditional martial and medical arts dating from at least the 12th century AD. Based on 20 years of research and practice in Kerala, this study traces how kalarippayattu is a mode of cultural practice through which bodies, knowledges, powers, agency, selves, and identities are constantly repositioned. This book is intended for academics over a wide range of disciplines, historians, anthropologists, those interested in theatre studies, performance studies and cultural studies, those practising dance and kalari , those interested in Kerala and South Asian Studies.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: While the use of interpreters in fieldwork is far from marginal in anthropological practice, it has received curiously little attention in anthropology texts as discussed by the authors, on the basis of a review of what li...
Abstract: While the use of interpreters in fieldwork is far from marginal in anthropological practice, it has received curiously little attention in anthropological texts. On the basis of a review of what li...

95 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a post-Merleau-Ponty phenomenology is used to understand the embodied work of the actor in the performance of an actor. But, like all accounts of embodiment and experience, this one is necessarily limited by our propositional modes of representation, since it is extremely difficult to express the full meaning of our experience.
Abstract: How can the contemporary actor’s body and experience in performance be theorized? 2 What methodological tools are useful in an attempt to better understand the embodied work of the actor? This essay applies one among a set of complimentary methodological tools to this question—a post‐Merleau-Ponty phenomenology. 3 Like all accounts of embodiment and experience this one is necessarily limited by “our propositional modes of representation,” since it is extremely difficult “to express the full meaning of our experience.” 4 In spite of such limitations, this essay is intended to contribute to phenomenological studies of embodiment by extending their focus from

81 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper assess the empirical literature in this area via four interconnecting categories pertaining to martial arts and embodiment: (1) body cultures; (2) body pedagogies; (3) the embodiment of gender; and (4) bodily harm.
Abstract: Since the late 1970s, social scientists have turned considerable attention to investigating martial arts and combat sports (MACS). In particular, this broad range of fighting disciplines has been shown to offer numerous avenues for scholarly enquiry into social change and personal transformation via processes of embodiment. Adopting a thematic structure, we assess the empirical literature in this area via four interconnecting categories pertaining to MACS and embodiment: (1) body cultures; (2) body pedagogies; (3) the embodiment of gender; and (4) bodily harm. Following this review, we identify several gaps in the existing literature, suggesting potential new topics and strategies for research connecting to the social world of physical culture more generally.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A form of indigenous therapy that does not fit into officially recognised categories of 'Indian medicine' but is a popular source of informal medical care is investigated, demonstrating a progressive restriction over time in official definitions of medical expertise.

57 citations


Cites background from "When the Body Becomes All Eyes: Par..."

  • ...As such they have in common with other Indian traditions of bonesetting an association with sporting and martial arts traditions, such as Marma medicine in Kerala which has been related to fencing (Zimmerman, 1978:98) and Kalarippayattu (Zarrilli, 1998)....

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Book
04 Jul 2019
TL;DR: This article made a case for Hamlet as the world's most frequently filmed text, and using specially commissioned interviews with cast, directors and screenwriters, they discussed films from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East.
Abstract: 'Hamlet' and World Cinema reveals a rich history of cinematic production extending across the globe. Making a case for Hamlet as the world's most frequently filmed text, and using specially commissioned interviews with cast, directors and screenwriters, it discusses films from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. The book argues that the play has been taken up by filmmakers world-wide to allegorise the energies, instabilities, traumas and expectations that have defined the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In so doing, it rejects the Anglophone focus which has dominated criticism up to now and explores instead the multiple constituencies that have claimed Shakespeare's most celebrated work as their own. 'Hamlet' and World Cinema uncovers a vital part of the adaptation story. This book facilitates a fresh understanding of Shakespeare's cinematic significance and newly highlights Hamlet's political and aesthetic instrumentality in a vast range of local and global contexts.

55 citations