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Journal ArticleDOI

When Worlds Collide: Manichaeism and Christianity in Late Antiquity

24 Jun 2019-Undergraduate Research Journal (University of Oregon)-Vol. 15, Iss: 1, pp 43-56
TL;DR: The Undergraduate Library Research Award (ULRA) 2019 as mentioned in this paper was the first year of the ULA scholarship competition, with a total prize allocation of $1,000,000.
Abstract: Submitted to the Undergraduate Library Research Award scholarship competition: (2019). 24 p.

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Journal ArticleDOI
Peter Brown1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries and consider the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks in Egypt.
Abstract: This article examines the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries. The monks of Syria opted against work. Along with the Manichaean Elect, they expected to be supported by the alms of the faithful. Work for them was inconsistent with the ‘angel-like’ life of the ascetic. This view was hotly contested by the monks of Egypt, who regarded labour as part of the duty of the monk and as the monk’s link to a common, non-angelic humanity. Having sketched out the social and ideological background of both options, the article considers the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks of Egypt.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Mar 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors presented quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l'epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968).
Abstract: Dans les annees 1960, des quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l’epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968) ou supposees provenir de cette region tres pillee. De la, cette region etait supposee etre le lieu de production de ces verreries, qui aurait fourni aussi la Mesopotamie. L’A. mon...

2 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors suggest that the widespread appearance of canons, occurring over the long period of Late Antiquity (second to sixth centuries c.e.), was sometimes based on the belief that oral traditions were particularly vulnerable and had to be fixed as texts, but there was also anxiety over the destruction and falsification of written documents.
Abstract: Mani, a prophet from third-century Iran who founded the first world religion, famously claimed that he alone wrote down his own revelations, in contrast to Jesus, Zoroaster, and Buddha, who had left this task to their disciples. Although this assertion is clearly polemical, it does echo a concern shared by a number of traditions across Late Antique Eurasia, from Rome to China. Judaism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Confucianism all sought to consolidate the authoritative teaching of their founders in response to the perceived threat of loss or corruption, sometimes under the patronage of regional or local authorities. This widespread appearance of canons, occurring over the long period of Late Antiquity (second to sixth centuries c.e.), was sometimes based on the belief that oral traditions were particularly vulnerable and had to be fixed as texts, but there was also anxiety over the destruction and falsification of written documents. In conclusion, this article suggests that this striking development reflects a neglected mode of cultural exchange in Late Antiquity driven by members of court society, including religious experts such as Mani. Their activity within a network of courts across Eurasia, all connected indirectly even if there was no direct exchange between the ends, facilitated the gradual intercrossing of religious ideals and practices, such as the goal of consolidating founders’ teachings.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Peter Brown1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries and consider the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks in Egypt.
Abstract: This article examines the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries. The monks of Syria opted against work. Along with the Manichaean Elect, they expected to be supported by the alms of the faithful. Work for them was inconsistent with the ‘angel-like’ life of the ascetic. This view was hotly contested by the monks of Egypt, who regarded labour as part of the duty of the monk and as the monk’s link to a common, non-angelic humanity. Having sketched out the social and ideological background of both options, the article considers the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks of Egypt.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Mar 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors presented quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l'epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968).
Abstract: Dans les annees 1960, des quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l’epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968) ou supposees provenir de cette region tres pillee. De la, cette region etait supposee etre le lieu de production de ces verreries, qui aurait fourni aussi la Mesopotamie. L’A. mon...

2 citations