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Journal ArticleDOI

Who is the authority? The study of language registers and ideologies in two mother tongue classes in Copenhagen

TL;DR: This article investigated encounters between the two overall language resources (standard vs. non-standard and regional varieties) in two linguistic minority communities in Denmark, focusing on Turkish and Farsi mother tongue classes.
Abstract: Abstract This article investigates encounters between the two overall language resources – standard vs. non-standard and regional varieties – in two linguistic minority communities in Denmark. Concentrating on Turkish and Farsi mother tongue classes, the study departs from two interviews with the parents of mother tongue students. Additional ethnographic evidence from the respective mother tongue classes show when and how the two overall varieties of the respective languages are reacted to and valorized among the study participants. Two main issues are explored in this context: first, language ideological paradigms of dominance – anonymity and authenticity – and, second, the extension and expansion of language users’ ideologies regarding registers of language. The article concludes that during the encounters and discussions concerning ideological views supporting either of the overall language resources, a form for authority exists and becomes oriented to in line with the history of language policy of the countries of origin.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In this article, a linguistic ethnographic study demonstrates how children of Iranian descent in Denmark, participating in Persian heritage education, draw upon their adults' voices when they negotiate the purpose of learning and using their alleged mother tongue.
Abstract: This linguistic ethnographic study demonstrates how children of Iranian descent in Denmark, participating in Persian heritage education, draw upon their adults’ voices when they negotiate the purpose of learning and using their alleged mother tongue. The pupils range from competent language users to new speakers of Persian with basic linguistic knowledge. The study provides examples of Bakhtinian one’s or another’s words within class interactional situations in which pupils take turns and comment on each other’s involvement in language practice. Some children struggle with staying motivated. Some encourage younger and less competent classmates (including their siblings) to use and practice Persian. In doing so, they point to certain incentives of learning and using the language, such as the benefit of being able to communicate with relatives.
References
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Book Chapter
01 Jan 2009

1,710 citations


"Who is the authority? The study of ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...3 Second, I examine the language preferences and the resulted evaluations in relation to the centers of authorities (Blommaert 2010) to which some participants orient themselves or each other during their evaluation or rationalization of language practice....

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  • ...Also, they refer to “real or perceived ‘centers,’” i.e. centers of authority, from which the authority to evaluate or devaluate language registers are projected (Blommaert 2010: 39)....

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  • ...“Our way of speaking” and the language of metropolises were two main centers of authority (Blommaert 2010: 39) the adult informants oriented to....

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  • ...As Blommaert states, “such authorities have names, faces, a reality of their own” (Blommaert 2010: 39) and may exist outside the situated interaction....

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Book
Jan Blommaert1
08 Apr 2010
TL;DR: The Sociolinguistics of Globalization as mentioned in this paper constructs a theory of changing language in a changing society reconsidering locality, repertoires, competence, history and sociolinguistic inequality.
Abstract: Human language has changed in the age of globalization: no longer tied to stable and resident communities, it moves across the globe, and it changes in the process. The world has become a complex 'web' of villages, towns, neighbourhoods and settlements connected by material and symbolic ties in often unpredictable ways. This phenomenon requires us to revise our understanding of linguistic communication. In The Sociolinguistics of Globalization Jan Blommaert constructs a theory of changing language in a changing society reconsidering locality, repertoires, competence, history and sociolinguistic inequality.

1,308 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 2014

943 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: Hornberger as discussed by the authors discusses the relationship between language policy and language planning, and discusses examples of language policy that are not intentional and/or not planned, as well as the historical trajectory of the two fields.
Abstract: The natural first question is: What is language policy? The question is commonly asked in books on the topic but concrete definitions are less common than discussions of language policy in terms of types, goals, or examples. This chapter will take both approaches by first examining and synthesizing definitions already in circulation and then looking at some example language policies to see how these definitions hold up. Complicating the question is the relationship between language policy and the term that preceded it, language planning. Most would agree that language policy and language planning are closely related but different activities. Some argue that language planning subsumes language policy (Kaplan and Baldauf 1997) while others argue that language policy subsumes language planning (Schiffman 1996). For the title of this book, the term language policy is adopted for two reasons: (1) terminological simplicity, and (2) within accepted definitions of language planning, there is an assumption that some agent(s) makes a plan intended to influence language forms or functions, yet, there are many examples of language policy that are not intentional and/or not planned. However, throughout much of the book I will use language planning and policy, often referred to as LPP, both out of respect for the tradition of research that gave rise to the field (language planning) and The historical trajectory because the two fields have, for all intents and purposes, coalesced into one (Hornberger2006a).

844 citations


"Who is the authority? The study of ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Historically this ideological inclination is rooted in the “development of language policy” within a nation-state (Spolsky 2012: 5) based on the Neo-Hederian understanding that identifies one nation by virtue of a geographical territory and a language (Makoni and Pennycook 2007)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discuss the emergence and spread of a prestige register of spoken British English, nowadays called Received Pronunciation, and propose specific models for understanding the circulation of discourse across social populations and the means by which these values are recognized, maintained and transformed.

831 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...651 called enregisterment (Agha 2003: 231, 2006: 25–27, 2007: 81)....

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Trending Questions (1)
Is there a relation between language ideologies and linguistic registers?

Yes, the paper explores the relationship between language ideologies and linguistic registers in the context of encounters and discussions among the study participants.