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Journal ArticleDOI

Why the Arts Don't "Do" Anything: Toward a New Vision for Cultural Production in Education.

26 Mar 2013-Harvard Educational Review (Harvard Education Publishing Group)-Vol. 83, Iss: 1, pp 211-237
TL;DR: Ruben A. Gaztambide-Fernandez as discussed by the authors uses a discursive approach to argue that mainstream arts in education scholarship and advocacy construes "the arts" as a definable naturalistic phenomenon that exists in the world and is available to be observed and measured.
Abstract: In this essay Ruben A. Gaztambide-Fernandez uses a discursive approach to argue that mainstream arts in education scholarship and advocacy construes “the arts” as a definable naturalistic phenomenon that exists in the world and is available to be observed and measured. In the course of his analysis, he examines how this construction is employed through what he calls the rhetoric of effects as part of the mainstream discourses used in arts in education research today. He describes how this positivistic rhetoric masks the complexity of those practices and processes associated with the arts, limiting the possibilities for productively employing such practices in education. In addition, he explores how discourses of the arts both arise out of and continually reify hierarchical conceptions of artistic practices in education and broader society. He concludes by proposing an alternative rhetoric of cultural production, arguing that moving toward this new way of understanding practices and processes of symbolic c...
Citations
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Familiarity, ease of access, trust, and awareness of risks, will all be important for the future.
Abstract: 萨义德以其独特的双重身份,对西方中心权力话语做了分析,通过对文学作品、演讲演说等文本的解读,将O rie n ta lis m——"东方学",做了三重释义:一门学科、一种思维方式和一种权力话语系统,对东方学权力话语做了系统的批判,同时将东方学放入空间维度对东方学文本做了细致的解读。

3,845 citations

01 Aug 2001
TL;DR: The study of distributed systems which bring to life the vision of ubiquitous computing systems, also known as ambient intelligence, is concentrated on in this work.
Abstract: With digital equipment becoming increasingly networked, either on wired or wireless networks, for personal and professional use alike, distributed software systems have become a crucial element in information and communications technologies. The study of these systems forms the core of the ARLES' work, which is specifically concerned with defining new system software architectures, based on the use of emerging networking technologies. In this context, we concentrate on the study of distributed systems which bring to life the vision of ubiquitous computing systems, also known as ambient intelligence.

2,774 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Kuttner as mentioned in this paper argues for reframing arts education as a process of developing cultural citizenship, a concept from political theory and cultural studies, is concerned with the development of diverse cultural practices and identities alongside full participation in cultural and political life.
Abstract: Arts education does more than transfer the skills and knowledge needed to create artistic works. It also helps to shape young people's orientations towards participation in the cultural life of their communities. In this article, Paul Kuttner argues for reframing arts education as a process of developing cultural citizenship. Cultural citizenship, a concept from political theory and cultural studies, is concerned with the development of diverse cultural practices and identities alongside full participation in cultural and political life. Using this lens, we can look at different forms of arts education and ask, “What types of cultural citizens are these programs developing?” Building on the work of civic education scholars Westheimer and Kahne (2004), Kuttner suggests a few initial types before delving into a fuller description of what he calls the “justice-oriented cultural citizen.” This concept is illustrated with data from an ethnographic case study of one arts organization that is developing ...

73 citations


Cites background from "Why the Arts Don't "Do" Anything: T..."

  • ...If we understand the arts as forms of cultural production—as culturally-situated activities involving “actual people, under real social circumstances, in particular cultural contexts, and within specific material and symbolic relations” (Gaztambide-Fern andez, 2013, p. 226)—then we cannot escape the ways that artistic practice is implicated in larger social, economic, and political systems....

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  • ...Amid long-running debates about the roles and responsibilities of the artist in society (Becker, 1994; Becker & Wiens, 1995; Gaztambide-Fern andez, 2008), she conceptualizes the artist as change agent....

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  • ...Art is understood as a culturally-situated activity involving “actual people, under real social circumstances, in particular cultural contexts, and within specific material and symbolic relations” (GaztambideFern andez, 2013, p. 226)....

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  • ...In defining the arts this way, I am working from what Gaztambide-Fern andez (2013) calls a “cultural production” approach to the arts and arts education....

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  • ...…“actual people, under real social circumstances, in particular cultural contexts, and within specific material and symbolic relations” (Gaztambide-Fern andez, 2013, p. 226)—then we cannot escape the ways that artistic practice is implicated in larger social, economic, and political systems....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Setting to Work of Deconstruction (SOWCD) as discussed by the authors ) is a collection of essays about deconstruction and deconstruction in philosophy, literature, history, and culture.
Abstract: * Preface *1. Philosophy *2. Literature *3. History *4. Culture * Appendix: The Setting to Work of Deconstruction * Index

69 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this article, a social critic of the judgement of taste is presented, and a "vulgar" critic of 'pure' criticiques is proposed to counter this critique.
Abstract: Preface to the English-Language Edition Introduction Part 1: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste 1. The Aristocracy of Culture Part 2: The Economy of Practices 2. The Social Space and its Transformations 3. The Habitus and the Space of Life-Styles 4. The Dynamics of Fields Part 3: Class Tastes and Life-Styles 5. The Sense of Distinction 6. Cultural Good Will 7. The Choice of the Necessary 8. Culture and Politics Conclusion: Classes and Classifications Postscript: Towards a 'Vulgar' Critique of 'Pure' Critiques Appendices Notes Credits Index

23,806 citations

Book
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The Rise of the Creative Class as mentioned in this paper describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant, with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing.
Abstract: The national bestseller that defines a new economic class and shows how it is key to the future of our cities. The Washington Monthly 2002 Annual Political Book Award WinnerThe Rise of the Creative Class gives us a provocative new way to think about why we live as we do today-and where we might be headed. Weaving storytelling with masses of new and updated research, Richard Florida traces the fundamental theme that runs through a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing role of creativity in our economy. Just as William Whyte's 1956 classic The Organization Man showed how the organizational ethos of that age permeated every aspect of life, Florida describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant. Millions of us are beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always have-with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing. Leading the shift are the nearly 38 million Americans in many diverse fields who create for a living-the Creative Class. The Rise of the Creative Class chronicles the ongoing sea of change in people's choices and attitudes, and shows not only what's happening but also how it stems from a fundamental economic change. The Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. Their choices have already had a huge economic impact. In the future they will determine how the workplace is organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will thrive or wither.

7,252 citations


"Why the Arts Don't "Do" Anything: T..." refers background in this paper

  • ...One of the arguments for specialized arts education is that such programs prepare students who are talented or who have a passion for those cultural forms associated with the concept of the arts to pursue future careers in what economists such as Richard Florida (2004) refer to as the “creative industries.”...

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  • ...Richard Siegesmund (1998) declares that the constant need for reasserting the value of the arts is the “peculiar problem” of arts educators, “who must fight to maintain their discipline’s presence in the curriculum” (p. 197)....

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  • ...…arguments for specialized arts education is that such programs prepare students who are talented or who have a passion for those cultural forms associated with the concept of the arts to pursue future careers in what economists such as Richard Florida (2004) refer to as the “creative industries.”...

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1952
TL;DR: Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks as discussed by the authors is a major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, and is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world.
Abstract: A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today. "[Fanon] demonstrates how insidiously the problem of race, of color, connects with a whole range of words and images." -- Robert Coles, The New York Times Book Review

7,155 citations


"Why the Arts Don't "Do" Anything: T..." refers background in this paper

  • ...—Frantz Fanon Contemporary debates about public education rely on the kind of “shallow cultural analysis” that blames people—and their culture—for their circumstances and for the outcomes of their education (Pollock, 2008)....

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  • ...The only way to save artistic forms associated with the concept from their own demise, in fact, is to understand that the very notion of the arts might just be over, that all we have left is invention, as Frantz Fanon (1967) suggests....

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Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: From Jane Austen to Salman Rushdie, from Yeats to the media coverage of the Gulf War, this is an account of the roots of imperialism in European culture.
Abstract: From Jane Austen to Salman Rushdie, from Yeats to the media coverage of the Gulf War, this is an account of the roots of imperialism in European culture. While many historians and commentators have analyzed the phenomenon of the imperial power wielded by Britain (and France) in the 19th century, this book analyzes its impact on the culture of the period. The author focusses on the way this cultural legacy has embedded itself in the Western view of the East, and affects our relationship with the formerly colonized world at every level, both social and political. The author also wrote "Orientalism".

5,623 citations

Book
01 Jan 1936
TL;DR: One of the most important works of cultural theory ever written, Walter Benjamin's groundbreaking essay explores how the age of mass media means audiences can listen to or see a work of art repeatedly and what the troubling social and political implications of this are as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: One of the most important works of cultural theory ever written, Walter Benjamin's groundbreaking essay explores how the age of mass media means audiences can listen to or see a work of art repeatedly - and what the troubling social and political implications of this are. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

5,238 citations


"Why the Arts Don't "Do" Anything: T..." refers background in this paper

  • ..., Illuminations: Walter Benjamin essays and reflections (pp. 217–253)....

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  • ...Yet, as Walter Benjamin (1968) clarifies, all else is an attempt at ritual, the repetition of an outdated mode of the arts that reissues hierarchies of power. The only way to save artistic forms associated with the concept from their own demise, in fact, is to understand that the very notion of the arts might just be over, that all we have left is invention, as Frantz Fanon (1967) suggests. This requires advocating for what Willis (1990) calls a “profane” position, one that is irreverent toward the discourses of the arts and their lofty moral positioning in our society....

    [...]

  • ...Yet, as Walter Benjamin (1968) clarifies, all else is an attempt at ritual, the repetition of an outdated mode of the arts that reissues hierarchies of power....

    [...]