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Wireless LAN medium access control (MAC) and physical layer (PHY) specifications

01 Jan 1996-
About: The article was published on 1996-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 2375 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Media access control & PHY.
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing is presented, a novel routing protocol for wireless datagram networks that uses the positions of routers and a packet's destination to make packet forwarding decisions and its scalability on densely deployed wireless networks is demonstrated.
Abstract: We present Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing (GPSR), a novel routing protocol for wireless datagram networks that uses the positions of routers and a packet's destination to make packet forwarding decisions. GPSR makes greedy forwarding decisions using only information about a router's immediate neighbors in the network topology. When a packet reaches a region where greedy forwarding is impossible, the algorithm recovers by routing around the perimeter of the region. By keeping state only about the local topology, GPSR scales better in per-router state than shortest-path and ad-hoc routing protocols as the number of network destinations increases. Under mobility's frequent topology changes, GPSR can use local topology information to find correct new routes quickly. We describe the GPSR protocol, and use extensive simulation of mobile wireless networks to compare its performance with that of Dynamic Source Routing. Our simulations demonstrate GPSR's scalability on densely deployed wireless networks.

7,384 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The novel functionalities and current research challenges of the xG networks are explained in detail, and a brief overview of the cognitive radio technology is provided and the xg network architecture is introduced.

6,608 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: This paper explores and evaluates the use of directed diffusion for a simple remote-surveillance sensor network and its implications for sensing, communication and computation.
Abstract: Advances in processor, memory and radio technology will enable small and cheap nodes capable of sensing, communication and computation. Networks of such nodes can coordinate to perform distributed sensing of environmental phenomena. In this paper, we explore the directed diffusion paradigm for such coordination. Directed diffusion is datacentric in that all communication is for named data. All nodes in a directed diffusion-based network are application-aware. This enables diffusion to achieve energy savings by selecting empirically good paths and by caching and processing data in-network. We explore and evaluate the use of directed diffusion for a simple remote-surveillance sensor network.

6,061 citations

Amin Vahdat1
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: This work introduces Epidemic Routing, where random pair-wise exchanges of messages among mobile hosts ensure eventual message delivery and achieves eventual delivery of 100% of messages with reasonable aggregate resource consumption in a number of interesting scenarios.
Abstract: Mobile ad hoc routing protocols allow nodes with wireless adaptors to communicate with one another without any pre-existing network infrastructure. Existing ad hoc routing protocols, while robust to rapidly changing network topology, assume the presence of a connected path from source to destination. Given power limitations, the advent of short-range wireless networks, and the wide physical conditions over which ad hoc networks must be deployed, in some scenarios it is likely that this assumption is invalid. In this work, we develop techniques to deliver messages in the case where there is never a connected path from source to destination or when a network partition exists at the time a message is originated. To this end, we introduce Epidemic Routing, where random pair-wise exchanges of messages among mobile hosts ensure eventual message delivery. The goals of Epidemic Routing are to: i) maximize message delivery rate, ii) minimize message latency, and iii) minimize the total resources consumed in message delivery. Through an implementation in the Monarch simulator, we show that Epidemic Routing achieves eventual delivery of 100% of messages with reasonable aggregate resource consumption in a number of interesting scenarios.

4,355 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2000
TL;DR: GLS combined with geographic forwarding allows the construction of ad hoc mobile networks that scale to a larger number of nodes than possible with previous work, and compares favorably with Dynamic Source Routing.
Abstract: GLS is a new distributed location service which tracks mobile node locations. GLS combined with geographic forwarding allows the construction of ad hoc mobile networks that scale to a larger number of nodes than possible with previous work. GLS is decentralized and runs on the mobile nodes themselves, requiring no fixed infrastructure. Each mobile node periodically updates a small set of other nodes (its location servers) with its current location. A node sends its position updates to its location servers without knowing their actual identities, assisted by a predefined ordering of node identifiers and a predefined geographic hierarchy. Queries for a mobile node's location also use the predefined identifier ordering and spatial hierarchy to find a location server for that node.Experiments using the ns simulator for up to 600 mobile nodes show that the storage and bandwidth requirements of GLS grow slowly with the size of the network. Furthermore, GLS tolerates node failures well: each failure has only a limited effect and query performance degrades gracefully as nodes fail and restart. The query performance of GLS is also relatively insensitive to node speeds. Simple geographic forwarding combined with GLS compares favorably with Dynamic Source Routing (DSR): in larger networks (over 200 nodes) our approach delivers more packets, but consumes fewer network resources.

1,769 citations