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Journal ArticleDOI

Women and work in the shadow of globalisation.

01 Oct 2004-Indian Journal of Gender Studies (SAGE Publications)-Vol. 11, Iss: 3, pp 275-290
TL;DR: In this paper, women usually bear a significantly high share of the costs of economic change and adjustment associated with globalisation and conclude that before they can take advantage of the newly emerging economic opportunities women have to overcome the constraints they face in accessing credit skills markets and other necessary resources.
Abstract: Globalisation has ushered in complex patterns of socio-economic change the world over. While enhancing opportunities for some it also appears to shrink opportunities for others including disproportionately large segments of women from the weaker sections of society. The process must therefore be viewed as having implications and outcomes distinctly mediated by gender and this article seeks to discuss this with special reference to the situation in India. It show that women usually bear a significantly high share of the costs of economic change and adjustment associated with globalisation and concludes that before they can take advantage of the newly emerging economic opportunities women have to overcome the constraints they face in accessing credit skills markets and other necessary resources. (authors)
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that micro-finance can at best become a coping strategy for poor people, with the onus of survival falling disproportionately on women without necessarily benefiting them in terms of rights and entitlements.
Abstract: This article attempts to lay out the broad discursive space connecting the triad of microfinance, poverty and empowerment. Linking the neoliberal construction of individual agency with the construction of the role of ‘third world’ women in development, it critiques microfinance for a false promise of liberation which is predicated upon a reductionist approach to both poverty and patriarchy. The article argues that microfinance can at best become a coping strategy for poor people, with the onus of survival falling disproportionately on women without necessarily benefiting them in terms of rights and entitlements. However, with insights from primary observations, the article shows that it is possible for organisations to use microfinance as a tool to connect women to larger collectives and processes that are empowering. Such organisational initiatives require the right perspectives rather than huge funds. Thus, subversion of the neoliberal agenda can happen when microfinance is shorn of its larger than life...

38 citations


Cites background from "Women and work in the shadow of glo..."

  • ...In India, however, such a feminisation thesis has been contested on a general scale on account of the fact that here, women’s work is concentrated in a few sectors, such as, export-processing industries and sub-contracted, homebased work (Banerjee, 1997; Mukherjee, 2004)....

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: Omari et al. as mentioned in this paper used the lens of D'Cruz and Noronha's (Res Emot Organ 12:409-444, 2016) varieties of workplace bullying, elaborating on the sociocultural underpinnings of the phenomenon in the subcontinent, drawing on the extant literature.
Abstract: The study of workplace bullying (WPB) in India dates back over a decade, rendering it an established area of inquiry. This chapter, using the lens of D’Cruz and Noronha’s (Res Emot Organ 12:409–444, 2016) varieties of workplace bullying, elaborates on the sociocultural underpinnings of the phenomenon in the subcontinent, drawing on the extant literature. While the incidence rate of workplace bullying in India at over 40% across numerous inquiries is higher than many other countries, factors such as power, social categories, individualism and materialism are seen as triggers while factors such as spiritualism and social support are seen as antidotes. In showing how available empirical evidence from India demonstrates the role of the country’s ethos in the dynamics of workplace bullying, the chapter reinforces D’Cruz’s (Workplace bullying in India. Routledge, New Delhi, 2012; India: a paradoxical context for workplace bullying. In: Omari M, Paull M (eds) Workplace abuse, incivility and bullying: methodological and cultural perspectives. Routledge, London, pp 55–70, 2016a) thesis that India serves as a paradoxical context for the phenomenon. The chapter urges the incorporation of a sociocultural lens in studies of workplace bullying in India, maintaining that such an approach is critical to facilitate relevant and effective interventions to tackle the problem in the subcontinent. To this end, it proposes the adoption of metaphorical or a combination of dimensional and metaphorical frameworks in inquiries of workplace bullying in the country.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluate the data on educational outcomes in Asia, drawing particular attention to regions that face significant gender gaps, and examine the directions in which Asia should take its investments in women's education in order to improve women's engagement in the economy and to allow these countries to take better advantage of the global market.
Abstract: Over the last several decades, Asian labor markets have experienced significant adjustments resulting from their increased integration into the global market which have transformed women’s relationship within the labor market. In general, women have gained access to jobs in primarily low-skilled manufacturing industries and the service sector but have secured limited access to higher-skilled positions where there is more room for advancement. This is, in part, a result of the shortfalls in women’s education relative to males. Asia’s future competitiveness in the global economy and women’s economic empowerment in these countries hinge on the way Asia manages its investments in human capital. This paper evaluates the data on educational outcomes in Asia, drawing particular attention to regions that face significant gender gaps, and examines the directions in which Asia should take its investments in women’s education in order to improve women’s engagement in the economy and to allow these countries to take better advantage of the global market.

5 citations

15 Nov 2010
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of workforce participation rates, including various intercepts such as women's marital status, age-specific profiles of workers and overall regional variation.
Abstract: The paper is divided into nine sections. Following the Introduction, the first section is an overview of workforce participation rates, including various intercepts such as women's marital status, age-specific profiles of workers and overall regional variation. An analysis of the sectoral composition and employment status of workers follows in the second section. The third section looks at the human resource base in terms of literacy and educational levels of workers. The kind of opportunities created for the incremental labour during 1999-2000 to 2004-05 is also addressed in this section. The next two sections focus on agricultural and non-agricultural workers, and their employment statuses as self-employed and wage and regular workers. These sections attempt to analyse the changing scenario of the labour market and its implications for workers in general and women workers in particular. Self-employment, a critical category for women workers, receives special attention. The sixth section comments briefly on wage differentials between men and women workers. The seventh section consists of additional observations on the rather familiar category of unpaid work, which in fact adds to families' survival strategies. Newer opportunities are touched upon briefly in the subsequent discussion, and the final section concludes the discussion.

4 citations

References
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9,849 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of data from a study on garment-factory workers in Bangladesh finds a period of adolescence for young women working in the garment sector that is shown to have strong implications for the women's long-term reproductive health.
Abstract: This article examines data from a study on garment-factory workers in Bangladesh to explore the implications of work for the early socialization of young women. For the first time, large numbers of young Bangladeshi women are being given an alternative to lives in which they move directly from childhood to adulthood through early marriage and childbearing. Employment creates a period of transition in contrast to the abrupt assumption of adult roles at very young ages that marriage and childbearing mandate. This longer transition creates a period of adolescence for young women working in the garment sector that is shown to have strong implications for the women's long-term reproductive health.

158 citations


"Women and work in the shadow of glo..." refers background in this paper

  • ...In 1995 there were 2,400 such units, with more than one million workers 90 per cent of whom were women (Amin et al. 1998)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1990s, experts concentrated on the partial disintegration of the global order's traditional foundations: states as discussed by the authors, and the dominant tension of the decade was the clash between the fragmentation of states (and the state system) and the progress of economic, cultural, and political integration -in other words, globalization.
Abstract: What is the state of international relations today? In the 1990s, specialists concentrated on the partial disintegration of the global order’s traditional foundations: states. During that decade, many countries, often those born of decolonization, revealed themselves to be no more than pseudostates, without solid institutions, internal cohesion, or national consciousness. The end of communist coercion in the former Soviet Union and in the former Yugoslavia also revealed long-hidden ethnic tensions. Minorities that were or considered themselves oppressed demanded independence. In Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, and Haiti, rulers waged open warfare against their subjects. These wars increased the importance of humanitarian interventions, which came at the expense of the hallowed principles of national sovereignty and nonintervention. Thus the dominant tension of the decade was the clash between the fragmentation of states (and the state system) and the progress of economic, cultural, and political integration -in other words, globalization.

144 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a time perspective is brought to the discourses of globalization and development to make transparent hitherto opaque relations of power and identify openings for change, resistance and alternative political practice.
Abstract: This paper seeks to bring a time perspective to the discourses of globalization and development. It first connects prominent recent gender-neutral discourses of globalization with highly gendered analyses of development, bringing together institutional-structural analyses with contextual and experiential data. It places alongside each other 'First World' perspectives and analyses of the changing conditions of people in the 'developing' world who are at the receiving end of globalized markets, and the international politics of aid. To date, neither of these fields of expertise has made explicit the underpinning time politics of globalization. Naturalized as status quo and global norm these temporal relations form the deep structure of globalization and its neo-colonialist agenda. The paper uses feminist epistemology to explicate the taken-for-granted time politics of globalization and time-based ontology to render visible the gender politics of globalization. The combined conceptual force makes connections where few exist at present, maps complex processes and traces naturalized relations. It offers not a new or better theory of... but an approach to globalization that makes transparent hitherto opaque relations of power and it identifies openings for change, resistance and alternative political practice.

63 citations